Core Curriculum

Aesthetics

Core courses in aesthetics focus on the application or development of levels of expressive or technical skill in artistic production or aesthetic inquiry.

Primary departments: ArtMusicTheatre, Communication Studies

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

ART 130 ELEMENTS OF DESIGN

Prerequisite: Note: not open to students who have taken ART*134 or ART*135

A fundamental study of two-dimensional application of visual elements and principles of design. Students will explore composition through line, shape, value, texture, and color, and will be introduced to and use various materials and design techniques. For non-art majors.

ART 140 FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING (NON MAJORS)

Prerequisite: Note: not open to students who have taken ART*141

This fundamental course provides a variety of approaches to improve individual skills in drawing. Attention to line, shape, value, texture, and perspective are used to develop an understanding of what we see in relation to how we represent them visually. For non-art majors.

ART 150 ART & IDEAS

Prerequisite: Note: not open to students who have taken ART*256 or ART*257

A combined visual and thematic introduction to Western art. The form and content of painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphics will be studied through a series of themes and purposes.

ART 160 FUNDAMENTALS OF STUDIO ART

160A CERAMICS; 160B PAINTING; 160C PRINTMAKING; 160D SCULPTURE

Prerequisite: None

This course is an exploration of the processes and philosophies of various studio art disciplines. This course is designed for non-art majors to fulfill institutional core requirements in aesthetics, and is not open to students who have taken ART 211, 261, 271, or 281 respectively. Students may take two different topics to fulfill Core aesthetics requirements, but they may not repeat the same topic for credit.

COM 315 INTERNATIONAL STORYTELLING

Prerequisite: Core communications or permission

An introduction to world cultures through the analysis and performance of their stories. Meets Core credit for aesthetics and GPS- Border Crossing requirement. COM/EDCI credit.

COM 105 PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Prerequisite: None

This course investigates what constitutes performance in everyday life and how performance can be viewed as an aesthetic experience. The course will focus on the discipline of performance studies, its ties to the oral tradition, its ties to the oral interpretation movement, and current understanding of what constitutes a performance text. Meets Core credit for aesthetics. COM/TH credit

ENG 332 GLOBAL FILM

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes the historical or contemporary practice of non-U.S. cinemas, focusing on one national cinema per course. Students explore the cinema of a county, region, or linguistically-related collection of countries focusing on intersections of aesthetics, socio-historical context, ideology, and film industry practices. Meets Core credit for aesthetics and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 371 LITERATURE AND FILM

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes film aesthetics and visual narrative as it compares to written literary narrative. The course focuses on both classic and contemporary motion pictures, with particular attention to shot composition, editing techniques, lighting, and sound. Students will consider how these elements of film direction create a visual narrative that can be studied as aesthetic and cultural expression.

MUSIC 010 UNIVERSITY MARCHING BAND  

1 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: None

Marching Band meets in the fall semester only. Membership is open to students from all majors. The band appears at all home football games, selected campus and community events, and a selected away game or marching exhibition. The ability to play a wind or percussion instrument or ability to be part of the auxiliary units (color guard or feature twirler) is a prerequisite. Auxiliary members must audition. Major ensemble. No audition is required.

MUSIC 010A UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND

1 Credit Hour   Prerequisite: Audition

Concert Band meets in the spring semester only. Membership is open to students of all majors. The ability to play a wind or percussion instrument is a prerequisite. Major ensemble.

MUSIC 011 BRASS ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform brass chamber music.

MUSIC 012 WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform woodwind chamber music.

MUSIC 013 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform percussion ensemble music.

MUSIC 014 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 

1 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will sight read, rehearse and perform jazz music in the big band idiom at their highest potential. In addition to campus performances, there will be concerts and tours off campus.

MUSIC 015 JAZZ COMBO 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will interact spontaneously with one another, improvise at high levels, learn the standard combo literature and create new arrangements and compositions.

MUSIC 020 WOMEN'S CHORUS  

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Promotes healthy vocalization, musical literacy and artistic development through choral music for treble voices.

MUSIC 022 UNIVERSITY CHOIR

1 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform music suitable for the choral medium to a high degree of artistic excellence. Major ensemble.

MUSIC 030 CHAMBER SINGERS 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform music suitable for vocal chamber ensembles to a high degree of artistic excellence. In the fall semester, the focus is usually on a traditional Renaissance Madrigal Feaste.

MUSIC 031 OPERA WORKSHOP 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will rehearse, learn, and perform operatic literature resulting in a staged and costumed production at the end of the semester.

MUSIC 050 SPECIAL ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

The preparation and performance of music composed for a particular combination of resources not covered by other ensembles.

MUSIC 052 ASHLAND AREA CHORUS 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: None

A mixed chorus that allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform choral music to a high degree of artistic excellence. This chorus sings regularly with the Ashland Symphony Orchestra. No Audition is required.

MUSIC 150 PRINCIPLES OF MUSIC MAKING

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to musical skills and concepts including notation, piano, treble recorder, and singing.

MUSIC 1SG BASIC GUITAR MUSICIANSHIP

MUSIC 348 KEYBOARD HARMONY

Prerequisite: MUSIC*271, MUSIC*241 or MUSIC*341

This course serves the music education major with choral emphasis and focuses on accompanying, improvisation, and score-reading skills.

MUSIC 225 MUSICAL STYLE

Prerequisite: None

Course will examine the fundamental question of what distinguishes different styles of music. Selected examples from classical, folk, and popular music's will be studied.

MUSIC 251 TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION: LOVE SONGS

Prerequisite: None

Musicians from a wide variety of time periods and styles have composed songs about love. This course will explore selected love songs from Western culture, from medieval troubadour ballads to current show and pop

tunes. Emphasis will be on understanding how artists have used music to express texts about love and how musical expressions of love have changed over time.

MUSIC 252 TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION: MUSIC AND DRAMA ACROSS CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

 What does music add to drama? Why have so many cultures found it effective? Which uses of music in drama are universal? This course examines the interaction of music and drama in a variety of cultural traditions, from ancient Chinese opera to the latest Hollywood blockbuster.

TH 203 THEATRE AESTHETICS

Prerequisite: None

Students will examine ways in which theatre art and theatre artists suggest meaning and invite interpretation of the human experience. Critical standards and theories specific to theatre will be discussed and then applied to the study of selected play scripts and performances.

TH 207 THE VISUAL ART OF THEATRE

Prerequisite: None

The course offers the opportunity to learn, develop and practice the art of set, costume and lighting design. Students are required to critically analyze all visual and other sensory aspects of a live production.

TH 208 VOCAL EXPRESSIONS OF LITERATURE

Prerequisite: None

The study and interpretation of literature through oral performance. Emphasis on vocal and body technique, textual analysis and the communication of various literary art forms expressing their intellectual, emotional and aesthetic qualities through oral performance.

TH 214 ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS

Prerequisite: None

This course is a study of acting as an art form. It emphasizes an acting process and skills utilized by the beginning actor.

TH 303 AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE

Prerequisite: None

This course is an exploration of the development of the Broadway musical during the twentieth century. Representative musicals will be examined in terms of style, elements, and structure in order to identify criteria for aesthetic evaluation.

Communications

Core courses in communications focus on understanding the transactional nature of oral communication in its relation to audiences of one or many. Some group and several short speeches are usually part of the course.

Primary Department: Communication Studies

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

COM 101 HUMAN COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite: None

This course encompasses communication theory, interpersonal communication, small group common- citation and public speaking. Emphasis is placed on speaking, critical thinking, listening skills. Attention is also paid to nonverbal communication.

COM 120 HEALTH COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite: None

This course encompasses communication theory, interpersonal communication, small group and team communication and public speaking specific to the healthcare setting. Emphasis is placed on speaking, critical thinking, listening, and feedback skills. Attention is also paid to non-verbal communication.

Composition

Composition courses demonstrate a fundamental commitment to the writing process consistent with the objectives and outcomes as Composition I and Composition II courses offered in the English department, and for which there will be a portfolio assessment process.

Primary Department: English

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

ENG 101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

Prerequisite: ENG 100 if required by placement

This course stresses the development of effective grammatical and rhetorical form through the assignment of expository and argumentative writing projects. May not be taken for S/U credit.

Historical Reasoning

Historical Reasoning courses embody the application of rational inquiry to past events or periods. Courses usually employ primary sources to examine and attempt to account for change and persistence in human events over time, not in one particular sphere of life but in human life more generally across a variety of disciplines.

Primary departments: History/Political Science

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

ECON 434 DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Prerequisite: None

A study of how people's thought on economic issues has changed overtime. . Meets Core credit for historical reasoning. Offered Infrequently.

FREN 301 FRENCH CIVILIZATION: MEDIEVAL TO ENLIGHTENMENT

Prerequisite: FREN*252 or equivalent

Provides an introduction to major trends in French civilization and culture from the Gallo-Roman period to the Revolution.  Taught in French. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

HIST 112 WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

This course will seek to answer the question What is civilization? Through the study of certain historical moments in the West-classical Greece, the Roman Republic, early Christianity, the High Middle Ages, and the Renaissance-this class examines the changes over time in politics, religion, society, economics, and culture and to realize the extent to which the present world has inherited these institutional and intellectual foundations of human life. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

HIST 113 WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

This course examines how the peoples of Western Europe understood freedom and sought to secure it in the 500 years from the Renaissance to WW II.  Meet Core credit for historical reasoning.

HIST 212 AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH THE CIVIL WAR

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the creation and development of a distinctively American civilization, from its origins through the Civil War (to 1865). Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

HIST 213 AMERICAN HISTORY AFTER THE CIVIL WAR

Prerequisite: None

An examination of how the fundamental American principles of freedom and equality have developed as the United States emerged as the world's leading power from the Civil War to the present. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

MUSIC 351 MUSIC HISTORY I: MEDIEVAL, RENAISSANCE, AND BAROQUE MUSIC

Prerequisite: MUSIC*150 or MUSIC*271

A detailed study of Western Art music, as well as related folk and non-Western styles, through the Baroque period. The focus will be on understanding the major developments of music history as well as learning how to conduct historical research in music. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

MUSIC 380 MUSIC HISTORY SEMINAR I

Prerequisite: MUSIC*150 or MUSIC*271 or MUSIC*272 or permission

A variety of topics, spread across the history of Western classical music, will be chosen to explore. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of several representative periods, styles, genres, and composers of Western classical music and be able to understand and place them within their historical context. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

REL 230 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY

Prerequisite: REL*106

Focuses upon selected literature and significant historical events in the development of Christianity from the 2nd to the 5th century. One central question will guide our inquiry: How did orthodox Christianity overcome various challenges to become the dominant religious tradition in the West?  Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

REL 231 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL AND REFORMATION CHRISTIANITY

Prerequisite: REL*106

Focuses on the history of Christianity from the 6th to the middle of the 17th century. Emphasis will be primarily on the social context within which medieval and Reformation Christianity developed, and secondarily on Christian thought during the period. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

REL 232 HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPEAN CHRISTIANITY

Prerequisite: REL*106

Focuses on the history of Christianity in Europe from the mid-17th century to the present. Emphasis will be primarily on the social context within which modern European Christianity developed, and secondarily on Christian thought during the period. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

REL 233 HISTORY OF RELIGIONS IN AMERICA

Prerequisite: REL*106

Focuses on the history of religions in America from the mid-16th century to the present. Emphasis will be primarily on the social context within which American religions developed and secondarily on American religious thought during the period. Meets Core credit for historical reasoning.

Humanities

Core Humanities courses involve the application of uniquely literary and interpretive modes of inquiry with regard to the study of written and spoken languages, literatures, and to the traditions of interpretation, theory and criticism of religious, philosophical, and textual ideas.

Primary departments: EnglishReligionPhilosophy, Foreign Languages

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

CHEM 350 SCIENCE AS A CULTURAL FORCE

A – THE MAKING OF THE BOMB

B – THE TOBACCO WARS

C – SCIENCE AND HUMAN NATURE

D – EVOLUTION: FOR & AGAINST

E – SCIENCE AND RATIONALITY

Prerequisite: Any natural science core course

An inquiry into the nature of the scientific method in relation to human culture and its use in gaining and applying new knowledge. This course constitutes a substantial interdisciplinary investigation of the impact of science and technology upon society by way of a sustained look at one particular scientific issue or question for the semester. The ethical dimensions of advances in science and technology are explored in detail. Meets Core credit for humanities or natural sciences, but not both. May be taken only once for Core credit. CHEM/ GEOL/PHYS/PHIL credit.

ENG 203 AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course focuses on a specific problem or question in American society from the colonial period to the present. Possible areas of focus might include Race and Slavery; Nature and the Environment; Freedom, Democracy, and the Individual; Immigration and Nativism; Gender in America; or America at War.

ENG 210 BIBLE AS LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

The course involves a sustained study of representative Biblical texts using the tools of literary analysis and approaches the Bible as literature from a social, historical, and literary perspective.

ENG 217 BRITISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course involves a sustained study of selected texts of British literature and emphasizes literary content as statement of moral and philosophic attitudes in British writers.

ENG 304 SHORT STORY

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course is an intensive study of the short story as a literary genre with particular attention to narrative construction and to techniques used by authors.

ENG 308 THE POEM

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

The course focuses on poetry and poetics.

ENG 309 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course closely examines representative works by African American writers, ranging from early slave narratives to contemporary prose, poetry, and drama.

ENG 314 WOMEN'S LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course focuses on representative texts written by women across a variety of periods and examines the way in which women's experience has shaped their writing.

ENG 315 GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course involves reading and discussion of a number of major writings in German literature. Some of the themes include the conflict between artistic and bourgeois values, class and ethnic conflict, legal issues, aesthetic concerns, and contemporary cultural movements. Meets Core Requirements for Humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 317 STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

Students will read examples of Shakespearean histories, comedies, romances, and tragedies, exploring language and dramatic technique to develop an understanding of the structure and themes.

ENG 319 MODERN DRAMA

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course studies European and American drama from the late 1800s to the present. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 322 MODERN POETRY

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course focuses on close reading of selected modern poems and discusses the ways in which modern poetry differs from earlier work in English. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 324 MODERN NOVEL

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course analyzes the modern novel as art form and as social document. Representative novels in English and/or English translation will be examined to explore a central question: How is the modern novel a reaction to the problems and issues of modernity? Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 330 AFRICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes the study of literature produced on the African continent during the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods. Primary texts will be supplemented by critical, cultural, and historical materials related to Africa. The course traces the themes of African nationalism and post-colonialism as dramatized in the works of major African authors. Meets Core credit for humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 333 AMERICAN STUDIES - 19TH CENTURY

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion and/or culture from the 19th century, this course focuses on how literature captures the American spirit. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 334 AMERICAN STUDIES - 20TH CENTURY

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion and/or culture from the 20th century, this course focuses on how literature captures the American spirit. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 337 MAJOR WORKS

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course explores the human desire to make sense of history through literature. Each class explores a theme - such as the nature of good and evil, or the place of human beings in the world - within the context of several major works. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 338 THEMES AND TOPICS IN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course explores a major idea or theme through a wide range of literary and related texts. Typically, the seminar will focus on a particular historical, social, or artistic idea. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 340 READINGS IN JEWISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course involves reading and discussion of a number of major works of in Jewish literature. Students will read short stories, novels, and a memoir; some themes include religious faith, silence, the father-son relationship, gender issues, grief, wisdom, and folly. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 350 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN STUDIES

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion, and/or culture from contemporary life, this course considers a body of literature, generally published within the previous twenty years, about which historical conclusions are still largely unformed. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 360 LITERATURE OF CRIME AND RETRIBUTION

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes close analysis of literature on themes including evil, faith, insanity, racism, motiveless malignity, and psychological theories. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 365 GREEK LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course will address the question, What was the Greek view of men and women in relation both to each other and to the gods as revealed in their literature? Readings will include at least one of the Homeric epics together with a selection of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 370 RUSSIAN NOVEL

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

Students will discuss Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamozov. Among the many questions these monumental novels raise, perhaps the most important is how we can maintain our humanity in the face of suffering. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 372 NIETZCHE AND THE PROBLEM OF VALUES

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

Students taking this course will read a major work of Nietzsche's such as Thus Spake Zarathustra or The Twillight of the Idols together with other selected literary and philosophical texts by such authors as Heidegger, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, and Melville from both philosophical and literary perspectives to determine how and why human beings create values. Meets Core credit for humanities.

ENG 3SGB HEIDEGGER & THE QUESTION OF INTERPRETATION

Description not available at this time.

FL 220 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN LITERATIRE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite: None

This course critically examines contemporary Latin American Revolutionary literature, in English translation. Meet Core credit for humanitites and GDP-Border Crossings.

FL 221 U.S. MEXICO - BORDER LITERATURE

Prerequisite: None

This course critically examines the political, socio-economic, historical, cultural, and linguistic features of the U/S.-Mexico border, including the relationships between two nations, through literary readings and cultural analysis. Tauight in English. Meets Core credit for humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

FL 2SGB PARIS IN LITERATURE

Description not available at this time.

FL 3SG QUESTS & QUESTIONS IN ARTURIAN LITERATURE, FILM & LIFE

Description not available at this time.

FREN 353 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE I

Prerequisite: FREN*252 or equivalent

The course emphasizes the ways in which representative works of pre-Revolutionary French literature are both products of and windows into their historical and cultural contexts. Students will learn and practice analysis of forms of literary expression as they relate to the production of meaning. All texts and discussions are in French. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for humanities.

FREN 354 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE II

Prerequisite: FREN*252 or equivalent

A close examination of major French Literary texts from the Revolution to the present, read as reflections of and reactions to the historical and cultural movements of the periods in which they were written. Students will learn and practice analysis of forms of literary expression as they relate to the production of meaning. All texts and discussions are in French. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for humanities.

PHIL 204 CONCEPT OF TRUTH

Prerequisite: None

This course intensively examines the concept of truth as it has been manifested in major western philosophers from the ancient and medieval period, the classical modern period, and the contemporary period in the history of philosophy. Students will consider how the philosophical concepts of truth in their respective time periods served as underpinnings for the entirety of culture at the time, and how that sheds light on how contempt- orary considerations of truth hold sway. Meets Core credit for humanities.

PHIL 208 MAJOR THINKERS IN DIALOGUE

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the history of ideas through analyses of central and original texts of two great philosophers whose works form a dialogue, focusing not merely on the study of major works of philosophy, but also on the intellectual milieu in which those works are situated and the impact those works have had on a variety of other fields and on society in general. Students will come to know philosophical ideas and will strengthen their critical abilities in regard to basic concepts. Meets Core credit for humanities.

PHIL 210 PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN NATURE

Prerequisite: None

Many fields of inquiry traffic in a conception of some fixed essence of humanity, in which we all share.  What makes this a philosophical issue is precisely that there is disagreement among philosophers as to whether or not there is such a constant, and what the possessions of such a notion entails. Meets Core credit for humanities.

PHIL 215 ETHICS

Prerequisite: None

This course is a substantive study of major classical figures in western moral philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. It deals with the questions: What are the fundamental rules that guide our actions? Can we ever rationally justify moral judgments? What is the relationship between ethics and religion? While this course emphasizes theory, the philosophers' views are explicated with regard to contemporary issues. Meets Core credit for humanities.

PHIL 280 APPLIED ETHICS

1, 2 or 3 Credit Hours, depending on length of section taken    Prerequisite: None

Five-, ten-, or fifteen-week sections which investigate moral philosophy as it manifests itself in practical contexts. The focus is on how to arrive at the best moral reasons for acting within practical parameters which present their own special tasks, vocabularies, and sets of problems. A maximum of three hours may be taken for Core humanities credit.

A – SPORTS AND ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral deliberation as applied to the context of sports, specifically youth sports, college athletics, and professional sports.

B – ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral issues as applied to the context of environmentalism.

D – MEDICAL ETHICS 1-3

This course is comprised of three ―separable -- one-credit courses regarding medical ethics. Part I has to do with moral foundations in medicine concerning paternalism, informed consent, and professional responsibilities. Part II deals with medical resource allocation, analysis of social policy from various ethical perspectives, and issues surrounding physician-assisted suicide. Part III focuses on research on humans and various issues in reproductive ethics.

H – APPLIED ETHICS: WORKPLACE ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral issues with particular attention to specific workplace contexts.

PHIL 309 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisite: PHIL*204, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 or permission

This course is the philosophical study of people in societies with particular attention to the abstract claims they have on each other in the form of individual rights, duties, and privileges, and their demands for equality, justice, and freedom. Offered fall of even years. Meets Core credit for humanities. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

PHIL 330 PHILOSOPHICAL READINGS

Prerequisite: PHIL*204, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 or permission

Philosophical readings courses are to be thought of as a series of great works which when taken together form a sustained whole. Offered every three semesters. Meets Core credit for humanities. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

PHIL 450 GREAT PHILOSOPHERS

Prerequisite: PHIL*204, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 or permission

This course evaluates the thinking of a single major theoretical figure across a series of original texts addressing different subjects, but usually including combinations of that thinker's views on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. Offered every three semesters. Meets Core credit for humanities. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

REL 220 TAKING HUMAN LIFE

Prerequisite: None

Deals with the questions of whether it is permissible to take human life and if so, what the conditions might be that warrant or limit such behavior. Examines the issues of euthanasia, abortion, capital punishment, suicide and warfare from literacy, philosophical, social, scientific, and religious perspectives, mainly from the Judeo- Christian viewpoint. Meets Core credit for humanities.

REL 240 JEWISH RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

Prerequisite: Core religion course

This course deals with a question that is central to all Jewish religious traditions: how do written and oral traditions combine to create the fabric of contemporary Jewish life? This question will be explored through selected Rabbinic writings and methods of Jewish Biblical interpretation, as well as distinctive Jewish religious practices and observances within the major movements in contemporary Judaism. Meets Core credit for humanities.

REL 250 UNDERSTANDING ISLAM IN TODAY'S WORLD

Prerequisite: None

An investigation of the basic beliefs and practices in Islam as they are understood and observed in various parts of the world. The course approaches Islam by focusing upon the ways that oral and written traditions combine with cultural factors to create the fabric of contemporary Islamic life. Topics include the foundations of Islam, the sources of legislation in Islam (Qur'an and Hadith), central ritual observances and social aspects of Islam in the contemporary world. Meets Core credit for humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

REL 340 RELIGION AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN AMERICA

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor when offered with a required service learning (SL) component

This course examines the involvement and non-involvement of churches and people of faith in the movement for civil rights in the United States. Contextualized in the History of America's racialized society, both African American and white religious responsibilities for, and responses to, social injustice are examined through the reading of autobiographies, primary documents, and secondary sources. Meets Core credit for humanities.

REL 3SGI LEGACY OF PAUL AND PETER IN ROME

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REL 3SGL LUTHER AND THE GERMAN REFORMATION

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SPAN 372 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: SPAN*310

A survey of the milestones of Spanish literature, from its beginnings to the present time. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years. Meets core credit for humanities.

SPAN 373 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: SPAN*310

A survey of the milestones of Latin American literature, from its beginnings to the present time. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.  Meets core credit for humanities.

TH 204 SCRIPT ANALYSIS

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to methods of script analysis or how to read a play.  Methods of script analysis will be discussed and applied to representative play scripts. Meets Core credit for humanities.

Lifetime Wellness

Core Lifetime Wellness courses include substantial components of the following areas: physical fitness, leisure studies, proper nutrition, weight training and cardiovascular activity, stress management, and lifestyle choices (concerning topics such as tobacco, alcohol, drugs and medications, and sexually transmitted diseases). Core courses usually include significant lab work and individual assessment.

Primary Departments: Sports Sciences, Nursing

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

HS 180 LIFETIME WELLNESS

Prerequisite: None

An examination and application of the components that contribute to the concept of wellness-a process of moving toward optimal health and vitality that emphasizes individual responsibility for well-being through the practice of self- assessment and the adoption of health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. FCS/HS credit.

NUR 303 NURSING PROCESS: INDIVIDUAL HEALTH

Prerequisite: None

Presentation of the nursing process as a tool to facilitate nursing practice. Emphasis is on assessment. The course assists the students in improving skills in nursing assessment through the collection and analysis of data to formulate nursing diagnoses and comprehensive health plans. The course incorporates laboratory experience; no offcampus clinical component is required. Meets Core credit for lifetime wellness. Clinical and health requirements must be met prior to participation in this course.

Math/Logic

Core math/logic courses involve the intrinsic study of and application of formal deductive modes of inquiry.

Primary departments: MathematicsPhilosophy

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

CS 101 LOGIC AND COMPUTING

Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra

Beginning with the building blocks of circuits and advancing through a collection of language abstractions, students use logic at several levels to gain a deep insight into how modern digital computers actually work. This course is intended for non-majors and assumes no computer hardware or programming experience.

MATH 110 FINITE MATHEMATICS

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra

Covers some topics of modern mathematics including principles of counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and mathematics of finance with applications to biology, business, economics, and other social sciences.

 MATH 201-202 CALCULUS WITH APPLICATIONS TO MANAGEMENT, LIFE, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES I-II

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra; one year of high school geometry; MATH*201 is a prerequisite for MATH*202

Functions, limits, techniques of differentiation and integration, with applications in the natural, social and management sciences. Does not count toward a major in mathematics. Only Math 201 meets Core credit for math/logic

MATH 205-206 THE CALCULUS I - II                          5 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: MATH*111 or equivalent; MATH*205 is a prerequisite for MATH*206

Essentials of analytic geometry, the theory and techniques of differentiation and integration with applications in business, social, and natural sciences. Only Math 205 meets Core credit for math/logic.

MATH 208 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 18 or above or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH*100

An introductory course designed to meet the needs of students in biology, business, economics, education, nursing, psychology, and sociology.  Sample and theoretical frequency distributions, data dispersion and central tendency, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and analysis of variance are topics studied.

MATH 217 THEORY OF ARITHEMETIC AND GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 18 or above or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH*100

A study of the mathematical theories and concepts underlying intermediate arithmetic and geometry. Topics include number theory, number systems, elementary probability, geometry, estimation, mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and communication. The course will emphasize the use of group work and manipulatives.

MATH 223-224 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I – II

Prerequisite: Three years high school college prep math, MATH*223 is a prerequisite for MATH*224

An introduction to mathematical reasoning, proofs, recursion, graph theory, tree structures, combinatorics, mathematical models, and algorithm design; applications to computer science. Only Math 223 meets Core credit for math/logic.

PHIL 205 DISCOURSE AND INQUIRY: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisite: None

Examines formal and informal fallacies as well as deductive and non-deductive reasoning as they emerge from actual historical philosophical texts. Major themes will include fundamental questioning and the search for meaning and truth which have characterized philosophical thinking.

PHIL 220 PRACTICAL THINKING

Prerequisite: None

Examines formal and informal fallacies, symbolic translation, and deductive and non-deductive reasoning as they emerge in everyday practical contexts. The student will learn the basics of argument, master the notions of validity and soundness, and perform some real world proofs to enable him to defend against the persuasive tools used against him daily.

PHIL 320 SYMBOLIC LOGIC

Prerequisite: PHIL*220 recommended

This course is a more advanced offering of techniques in logical analysis.  Students will focus on constructing deductive arguments, engage in symbolic translation, recognize formal argument forms, do truth-table analysis, conduct proofs, and employ sentential and quantificational logics.

Natural Sciences

Core courses in the natural sciences involve the application of the scientific method primarily to events in the natural world, explored via applied inquiry.

Primary departments: BiologyChemistryGeology,Physics

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

BIO 100 HUMAN BIOLOGY                           4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None

This course addresses the questions of what it means for cells to be alive, and how individual cells are integrated into a complex, self- regulating human organism capable of survival in its own right. Three lectures and one twohour laboratory per week. This course does not count toward a biology major nor minor. Offered each semester. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

BIO 107 PLANTS AND CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

An examination from a global perspective of the role that plants have played in the history of civilization, with consideration of the biology and chemistry of plants, their availability in different parts of the world, and their uses for food, fiber, beverages, and medicine. Two lecture discussion periods and one two-hour laboratory per week. This course does not count toward the biology major or minor. Meets Core Natural Science and Border Crossing requirements.

BIO 110 ECOLOGY AND THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT      4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None

This course examines the characteristics of ecosystems, the ways in which they change with time, and the impact of human activities on those changes. Three lectures and one two-hour lab per week. This course does not count toward a biology major or minor. Offered each semester.  Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

BIO 111 WETLANDS & WATERWAYS

Prerequisite: None

This course is organized around the central question: How does the cycling of water shape the world in which we live? Students will practice a variety of investigative techniques from library study to field and laboratory work, and they will exercise their skills in critical thinking and analysis. Written and oral communications will also be emphasized. This course does not count toward a biology major or minor. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

BIO 201 MOLECULAR & CELLULAR BASIS OF LIFE       4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry or equivalent strongly recommended

This course centers on the question: What are the molecular and cellular processes that define life, and how are they sustained from generation to generation?  Three lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

BIO 202 ORGANISMS, ADAPTATION, AND DIVERSITY      4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite:  None

This course centers on the question: How do organisms solve the problems of survival, and how are the solutions that have evolved influenced by the environment? Students will examine how observed similarities and differences in organismal structure and function relate to environmental pressures, as well as studying how these observations can be used to construct a logical theory of evolutionary relationships between different organisms. Three lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 103 GENERAL CHEMISTRY                              4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: High school chemistry, 3 yrs High School math

This course introduces the properties of atoms and molecules using the logical processes of scientific reasoning and investigation.  The laboratory emphasizes the development of technical skills using safe laboratory practices. Inquiry approaches to problem-solving are introduced, and conclusions are drawn based on data at hand. Chemical and scientific thinking skills are assessed using formal laboratory reports. Offered every fall. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 104 GENERAL CHEMISTRY                              4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: CHEM*103

This course examines chemical reactions using the logical processes of scientific reasoning and investigation. The laboratory emphasizes the development of technical skills using safe laboratory practices. Inquiry approaches to problem-solving are introduced, and conclusions are drawn based on data at hand. Chemical and scientific thinking skills are assessed using formal laboratory reports. Offered every spring. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 250 LEAD AND CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

An intensive examination of the role lead has played in the history of civilization, with emphasis on how the uses and toxicity of this metal are related to its chemical properties. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 251 MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE

Prerequisite: None

The vibrant world of chemistry is explored by seeking answers to three specific questions: 1) What is a molecule? 2) How are molecules constructed? 3) How are molecules characterized? Answers to these questions are sought by an in-depth investigation of organic molecules that are either encountered in daily life or are, in part, critical for sustaining life.  Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 252 CHEMISTRY OF CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION

Prerequisite: High school chemistry

This course relates real world applications of analytical chemistry to the investigation of crimes. The underlying chemistry and biochemistry involved in forensic analysis are addressed. Also, the exploration of scientific inquiry as it relates to developing hypotheses and providing proof of a crime based on chemical evidence is investigated. This course does not count toward any major in the natural sciences. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

CHEM 253 CHEMICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LIFE        4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the question: What do living organisms look like from a chemical perspective? Answering this question requires an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts of inorganic, organic and biochemistry.  The course assumes no chemistry background. It does not meet major or elective requirements of majors in Chemistry/Geology/Physics or Biology/Toxicology Departments. Three lectures and one-1hr.50min. lab per week. Meets core credit for natural sciences. It does not meet major or elective requirements in CHEM/GEOL/PHYS and BIO/TOX departments.

CHEM 350 SCIENCE AS A CULTURAL FORCE

A – THE MAKING OF THE BOMB

B – THE TOBACCO WARS

C – SCIENCE AND HUMAN NATURE

D – EVOLUTION: FOR & AGAINST

E – SCIENCE AND RATIONALITY

Prerequisite: Any natural science core course

An inquiry into the nature of the scientific method in relation to human culture and its use in gaining and applying new knowledge. The ethical dimensions of advances in science and technology are explored in detail.  Meets Core credit for humanities or natural sciences, but not both. May be taken only once for Core credit. CHEM/ GEOL/PHYS/PHIL credit.

 CS 245 ROBOTICS AND MACHINE LEARNING

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the theory, design, and implementation of elementary robotics systems and machine learning techniques. This course is intended for non-majors and assumes no computer science background. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

GEOL 210 NATURAL DISASTERS

Prerequisite: None

What are natural disasters, and how can science lessen the damage done by events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe weather? This course will examine these events and how geologists attempt to predict when and where natural disasters are most likely to occur, as well as identify what steps endangered communities can take in order to avoid or minimize the danger posed by these natural processes. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

GEOL 211 DISCOVERING THE ICE AGE

Prerequisite: None

How was the Ice Age discovered? This class will examine how 19th century scientists used stones, bones, and landforms to bring about a revolution in our understanding of earth history. It will also examine the scientific evidence upon which current models of the Pleistocene Ice Age are built, as well as how ice, sediment, and rock cores are providing us with new insights into past and future ice ages. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

GEOL 212 ARCHEOLOGY & HUMAN ANTIQUITY

Prerequisite: None

Where did humans come from? How far back in time can we trace the human lineage? The question of human antiquity is a topic of universal interest and speculation. Archaeology is a discipline that seeks to answer this question. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

GEOL 213 ASTEROIDS, COMETS, AND CATASTROPHISM

Prerequisite: None

How has the discovery of giant impact craters changed our understanding of earth history? This class will examine the scientific evidence for repeated asteroid and comet collisions with the earth, the catastrophic effect of these collisions, and the re-emergence of catastrophism as a viable paradigm in modern scientific theories. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

PHYS 107 THE HIDDEN LIFE OF THE STARS

Prerequisite: High school geometry and trigonometry

Basic concepts from astronomy will be developed in an algebraic framework and applied to understanding the life cycle of a star, including birth, main cycle, and death. There will be evening observation field trips.  Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

PHYS 320 ORIGINS OF THE UNIVERSE

Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry

A look from the scientific view point into the origin of the universe. The course takes a conceptual approach in understanding the two great physical theories of the twentieth century, Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, followed by applications in particle physics and cosmology. No previous science knowledge is assumed or required. Meets Core credit for natural sciences. 

Religion

Core courses in religion are academic rather than devotional, and explore the traditions, doctrines, and practices of religious life. From the perspective of the liberal arts, the academic study of religion is the critical and rigorous investigation of matters of belief in God, faith, and ritual practice, and includes theological and confessional traditions. Given the historic role of the Brethren Church and the Judeo-Christian heritage at Ashland University, it is expected that many core religion courses will have Christian themes and Biblical content. Courses that examine other world religions may be included.

Primary Department: Religion

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

PHIL 217 THOUGHT AND BELIEF

Prerequisite: None

The course probes specific areas where Western philosophy and the Christian tradition interrelate focusing on various religious topics that have philosophical implications, such as the nature of faith, salvation, the character of God, the problem of evil, and the practice of faith.

 REL 106 EXPLORING THE BIBLE

Prerequisite: None

An introductory study in which students gain an overview of the Bible, engage in literary analysis of Biblical texts and explore the Bible’s contemporary relevance. College-level writing skills are required.

REL 107 EXPLORING WORLD RELIGIONS

Prerequisite: None

An introductory exploration of historical developments, beliefs and practices in selected Eastern and Western world religious traditions. Since students will be introduced to methods for analyzing and interpreting sacred texts, college level writing skills are required.

REL 109 EXPLORING CHRISTIAN ETHICS

Prerequisite: None

An introductory exploration of principles, movements and topics of Christian theological ethics. This course guides students through complex questions of moral reasoning and some of the Biblical, historical and theological resources used to address them. Topics may include immigration, homosexuality and same-sex marriage, forgiveness and reconciliation, justice, war, and abortion. College level writing skills are required.

REL 110 EXPLORING CHRISTIAN HISTORY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

Prerequisite: None

Explores topical issues in world history as self- identified Christian communities interacted and conflicted with non-Christian ones. Emphasis will be placed on Christianity's historical relationship with Judaism and Islam in a global context.

REL 210 THE GOSPELS

Prerequisite: None

Study of the life and teachings of Jesus as portrayed in the New Testament gospels. Gospels are examined and compared.

Social Sciences

Social Science courses focus on the study of how people live, both as individuals and as members of society. Such courses might study humans as individuals, as members of various groups, as participating in and shaped by various institutions, or as members of society as a whole. While no single method characterizes the social sciences, each social science course is concerned to understand the method used in its attempt to understand how humans live.

Primary departments: PsychologyPolitical Science,Social WorkEconomicsCriminal Justice

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

DIET 213 SOCIETY'S INFLUENCE ON BODY IMAGE AND EATING

Prerequisite: Sophomore Status

This course will examine the societal determinants of a person's body weight, such as the influence of the family/parental, peers, societal norms, and the food and entertainment industries' impact on body image and dietary behaviors. This course will explore these societal factors that influence disordered eating, body shape, and weight loss/gain and discuss strategies to address these areas. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

ECON 101 MARKET FUNDAMENTALS

Prerequisite: None

This course will engage students in the economic way of thinking by taking an in-depth look at market fundamentals. Why, how, and who uses markets and what do we do when they fail? Students will be introduced to the economist's view of the world through extensive discussion, analysis, and writing. Does not count toward an economic major or minor. Meets Core credit for social science.

ECON 301 GAME THEORY

Prerequisite: Core math/logic requirement

Techniques using classical game theory, auction design, controlled human subject experiments, evolutionary game theory, and agent-based computer models are used to understand and solve situations involving potential conflict and cooperation such as military strategies, the auction of FCC licenses, the Middle East conflict, and the rise of resistant strains of bacteria in hospitals. While game theory is demanding in terms of reasoning ability, the focus of the class will be qualitative rather than quantitative analysis.  Meets Core credit for social sciences.

ECON 302 THE ECONOMICS AND HISTORY OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Prerequisite: None

This course examines the social, institutional, and economic environment from which some important American entrepreneurs have emerged and analyzes their impact on society. Emphasis is put on the institutional and economic environment in which an entrepreneur operates and the impact of the entrepreneur on this environment. Meets Core credit for Social Sciences.

ECON 324 ECONOMICS OF GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS

Prerequisite: ECON*101 or ECON*232 or ECON*233

This course examines the economic effects of the attempts of government to regulate natural monopolies and monopolistic behavior, and other business practices in the public interest and to promote and maintain competition in other areas of the economy. This course will provide the students with a perspective on how economics analyzes the interaction of government and business. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

ECON 331 COMPARATIVE CULTURAL ECONOMIC STUDIES

Prerequisite: Any ECON course

In today's world economy, countries around the globe have fashioned their own versions of a market-oriented economic system. This course will focus on why and how this has occurred, through the investigation and critique of various countries' economic systems from a cultural point of view. Special emphasis will be given to the under- standing of selected countries and cultures and prevailing economic policies and institutions. Meets Core credit for social science.

EDIS 245 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON DISABILTY

Prerequisite: None

This course will explore the various theories of disability (ableism/disablism, social, and medical models) and how disability is interpreted by the larger society. People with disabilities are often viewed at being deviant, stigmatized and incompetent and therefore, are marginalized from the "normal" population. This course will explore the construct of disability through the lens of race, gender, socio-economic class, geographic region and popular culture's presentation of disability in media. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

FCS 340 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the similarities and differences among families and marriages, family structures and functions, changes throughout the family life cycle, and the history of marriage and family in American culture.  Meets Core credit for social sciences.

FREN 302 FRENCH CIVILIZATION: REVOLUTION TO PRESENT

Prerequisite: FREN*252 or equivalent

In order to understand contemporary France and the French sense of identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. Taught in French. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

HS 201 IMPACT OF CHRONIC ILLNESS

Prerequisite: None

This course will explore the effects of chronic health issues on individuals and families, including lay caregivers. Readings will be analyzed for patterns and themes and compared with theoretical bases and research support related to chronic health experiences of the individual and family. Social justice concerns related to chronic illness, such as social stigma, availability of resources, access to care, and extension of life, will be discussed. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

HSCGH 202 GLOBAL CHALLENGES IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the challenges of public health from an international perspective through the focused examination of three historical case studies. In addition, a prospective assessment of public health will analyze its future role in promoting and protecting the health of populations across the globe (ex. South Asia or Sub-Saharan Africa). Meets Core credit for social sciences and International Perspectives requirement.

JDM 405 THE GLOBAL IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA

Prerequisite: Junior status

This course will study the evolution of social media and how it has changed the way society communicates and consumes information and content on a global scale. The course will focus on the application of relevant media theories in order to better understand how social media has shaped us as individuals and restructured interpersonal and mass communication on a societal level. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

MUSIC 226 MUSIC IN WORLD CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

In this course, we journey around the world, exploring how the musics of various non-Western peoples intertwine with the beliefs and actions that make up culture. Whether used as a political weapon, a facilitator for spiritual experience, a marker of national identity, or a way to connect otherwise disparate groups, music opens a door to cross-cultural understanding. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

POLSC 101 UNDERSTANDING POLITICS

Prerequisite: None

This course immerses students in the intensive study of the fundamental question: What is politics? Our goal is to understand how politics shapes society and what distinguishes the political from the economic social, artistic, religious, etc.  Meets Core credit for social sciences.

POLSC 345 WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT III: EARLY MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Prerequisite: POLSC*101 or permission of instructor

This course is designed to immerse students in the study of modern political thought. Those central concerns are human security, comfort, and liberty. We will examine this new politics of freedom by reading several great works of political philosophy from thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

POLSC 431 HUMAN BEING AND CITIZEN

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor

An attempt to understand the great issues animating politics-freedom, justice, equality, ethnicity-from the point of view of other disciple- lines and perspectives. The seminar will examine what it means to be a citizen, something of what it means to be a human being, and how each depends upon the other. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

PSYC 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I

Prerequisite: None

This course centers around the question, How do we explain human behavior? Inquiries are framed in the context of the major theoretical perspectives emergent from the sociohistorical evolution of psychology as a field of study.  Meets Core credit for social sciences.

PSYC 102 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY II

Prerequisite: PSYC*101

A continuation of 101 with an emphasis on science and the scientific method as it pertains to selected psychological topics and issues. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

PSYC 218 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the nature of adolescent behavior. The physical, cognitive, and psycho- social development of adolescents are examined in the contexts of peers, family, schools, work, and culture/society, using the theoretical perspectives identify that will allow the adolescent to function effectively in adulthood. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

SOC 301 RACE, ETHNIC AND MINORITY ISSUES

Prerequisite: None

An exploration of the question, Is there an American culture? The course will examine the interaction between the dominant and minority cultures in the United States.  The consequences of living in a multi-ethnic, multi-faith, multi-cultural society will be examined. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

SOCWK 230 GLOBAL HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Prerequisite: None

This course will explore global social justice issues through the lens of various human rights documents. Issues to be examined include forced labor, war and conflict, and violence against women and children. The history and development of these issues, how culture of individual countries and regions affect the issues and responses, as well as possibilities for the resolution of the issue will be examined. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

SOCWK 235 HOBOS AND HOMELESSNESS

Prerequisite: None

This course considers whether a population on the margin of society – in this case, persons without regular and dependable housing - can be studied objectively through the field research methodologies of the social sciences.  The course covers both voluntary and involuntary homelessness throughout the 20th century, including the changing social and economic context in which homelessness has existed. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

SOCWK 305 FAMILY VIOLENCE

Prerequisite: None

This course examines the dynamics of power and control in intimate relationships. Theories from the social sciences, particularly sociology, are use to assess these dynamics and the socio-cultural setting in which they exist. Readings introduce the historical status of women and children; dramatic exercises provide experiential learning about being involved in situations of power and control. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

SOCWK 330 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN

Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on women's issues from an international perspective and addresses the diversity and similarity of women's experiences worldwide. It considers the scope of gender injustice and the variety of factors (e.g. social, economic, political, religious)that contribute to it. The course examines current cross-cultural attitudes toward the family, women's work, and women's status and explores international gender equality movements and women's rights as human rights. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

 SPAN 311 CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN

Prerequisite: SPAN*310 or permission

In order to understand contemporary Spanish identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. The social organization and forces of Spain from ancient times to the present are examined with an emphasis on contemporary Spain. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

 SPAN 312 CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA

Prerequisite: SPAN*310 or permission

In order to understand contemporary Latin American identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. The social organization and forces of Latin America from ancient times to the present are examined with an emphasis on contemporary Spain. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years. Meets Core credit for social sciences.

GLOBAL PASSPORT STRATEGIES (GPS) INITIATIVE

For detailed information on the Global Passport Strategies Initiative, click here.

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

FREN 151 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I

Prerequisite: None. Appropriate course for beginners. Note: Not open to students who have placed into FREN*152, FREN*251 or FREN*252

An introduction to the French language and culture with practice in the basic skills of the language. Lab work required. Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 152 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II

Prerequisite:  FREN*151 or one to two years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into FREN*241 or FREN*252

A continuation of FREN 151. Lab work required. Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 251 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

Prerequisite: FREN*152 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Appropriate entry point for most students with more than two years of high school language.  Note: Not open to students who have placed into

FREN*252.

A course designed to increase the students understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. Lab work required.  Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 252 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

Prerequisite: FREN*251 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: Not open to students who place into 300 level courses.

A continuation of FREN 251. Lab work required. Taught in French.  Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

LTN 110 ELEMENTARY LATIN I

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax; and, through the study of the language, the culture of ancient Rome.

LTN 210 ELEMENTARY LATIN II

Prerequisite: LTN*110

A continuation of LTN 110. By the end of Latin 210, students will be beginning to read ancient Latin texts.

LTN 310 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I

Prerequisite: LTN*210

This course reviews and confirms knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while also introducing students to Latin authors such as Horace, Cicero, Catullus, or Vergil, through which students will deepen their knowledge of the life, culture, and politics of ancient Rome. Meets Core credit for GPS Value-Added or Border Crossings.

PORT 141 ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE I

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to Portuguese language and culture with practice in the basic skills of the language. Taught in Portuguese. Offered annually.

PORT 142 ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE II

Prerequisite: PORT*141

A continuation of PORT 141 Elementary Portuguese I. Taught in Portuguese. Offered annually.

PORT 241 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE I

Prerequisite: PORT*142

A course designed to increase the student's understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. There will be 1 hour per week required lab. Taught in Portuguese. Offered annually.

PORT 242 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE II

Prerequisite: PORT*241

A continuation of PORT 241. One-hour per week lab. Taught in Portuguese. Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement.  Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

SPAN 171 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Prerequisite:  None. Appropriate course for beginners. Note: not open to students who have placed into SPAN*172, 271, 272.

Introduction to Spanish language and culture with practice in the basic skills of the language. Lab work required. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 172 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Prerequisite: SPAN*171 or one to two years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: not open to students who have placed into SPAN*271 or 272.

A continuation of SPAN 171. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 200 INTERMEDIATE LEVEL INTENSIVE SPANISH STUDY ABROAD 3-6 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN*172 or equivalent, permission of the department, study abroad eligibility criteria

A program designed to provide students with an intermediate-level immersion experience. Students will attend six hours of language instruction per day, participate in cultural experiences, and live with families of the host cultures. Orientation and debriefing sessions on campus are required. 6 hours, or 3 hours plus SPAN 271 meets the GPS requirement.

SPAN 271 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

Prerequisite: SPAN*172 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Appropriate entry point for most students with more than two years of high school language. Note: Not open to students who have placed into SPAN*272.

A course designed to increase the student's understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. Lab work required. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 272 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Prerequisite: SPAN*271 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: Not open to students who place into 300 level courses.

A continuation of SPAN 271. Lab work required. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement.

GPS Study-away and study abroad components approved:

AHA, Segovia, Spain

American, Quebec City, Canada

CCIS, Aix-en-Provence, France

CCIS, Buenos Aires, Argentina

CCIS, Chambery, France

CCIS, Chicoutimi, Canada

CCIS, Florence, Italy

CCIS, London, England

CCIS, Rome, Italy

CCISA, Seville, Spain

CIS, Barcelona, Spain

COBE in Taiwan

EDEC 460 Sa: Student Internship: Early Childhood through

COST (Consortium of Overseas Student Teaching)

ENG 330 African Literature (Sa) Study Tour in Cape Town

Food and Culture of Ireland program

FUBis, Berlin, Germany

Honors Grecian-Turkish Odyssey proposal

Paris Fashion Institute Study Away program in France

USAC, Alicante, Spain

GPS Border Crossing Core Courses

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  For complete descriptions, see the Course Catalog.

BIO 107 PLANTS AND CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

An examination from a global perspective of the role that plants have played in the history of civilization, with consideration of the biology and chemistry of plants, their availability in different parts of the world, and their uses for food, fiber, beverages, and medicine.  Two lecture discussion periods and one two-hour laboratory per week. This course does not count toward the biology major or minor. Meets Core Natural Science and Border Crossing requirements.

BIO 476 ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Prerequisite:  30 hours of sciences courses (MATH, BIO, CHEM, GEOL,PHYS)

A detailed examination of the scientific dimensions of selected environmental issues, with discussion of the economic policy, and ethical aspects of those problems and with emphasis on global and international perspectives. Required for all EVS majors. Biology & Geology majors (but not EVS/Biology or EVS/Geology majors) may use this course as a biology or geology elective. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

COM 302 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite:  COM*101 or permission

Introduces students to methods of learning about other cultures and ways to communicate effectively with and about people of other countries and subcultures.  Meets GPS - Border Crossing requirement.

COM 315 INTERNATIONAL STORYTELLING

Prerequisite:  Core communications or permission

An introduction to world cultures through the analysis and performance of their stories. Meets Core credit for aesthetics and GPS- Border Crossing requirement. COM/EDCI credit.

ECON 342 GLOBAL ECONOMICS

Prerequisite:  ECON*232 or ECON*233

The theory of international trade, exchange rates, trade barriers, balance of payments disequilibrium, United States commercial and aid policies, regional economic integration and international economic development. Environmental, operational and functional variables in international economics. Meet core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

EDIS 245 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON DISABILTY

Prerequisite:  None

This course will explore the various theories of disability (ableism/disablism, social, and medical models) and how disability is interpreted by the larger society. People with disabilities are often viewed at being deviant, stigmatized and incompetent and therefore, are marginalized from the "normal" population.  Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 315 GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite:  Core composition II course

This course involves reading and discussion of a number of major writings in German literature. The students will read short stories, novels, poetry, and non-fiction. Some of the themes include the conflict between artistic and bourgeois values, class and ethnic conflict, legal issues, aesthetic concerns, and contemporary cultural movements. Meets Core Requirements for Humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 330 AFRICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes the study of literature produced on the African continent during the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods. Primary texts will be supplemented by critical, cultural, and historical materials related to Africa. The course traces the themes of African nationalism and post-colonialism as dramatized in the works of major African authors. Meets Core credit for humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

ENG 332 GLOBAL FILM

Prerequisite: Core composition II course

This course emphasizes the historical or contemporary practice of non-U.S. cinemas, focusing on one national cinema per course. Students explore the cinema of a county, region, or linguistically-related collection of countries focusing on intersections of aesthetics, socio-historical context, ideology, and film industry practices. Meets Core credit for aesthetics and GPS-Border Crossings.

FCS 211 CLOTHING & CULTURE

Prerequisite: None

The course explores the social, psychological, and cultural aspects of clothing and appearance. It includes the relationship of clothing and appearance to physical and social environments, aesthetic and personal expression, and cultural ideals and values. Meets Core credit for GPSBorder Crossings.

FCS 221 FOOD AND CULTURE

Prerequisite: None

Global view of the nutritional needs of individuals and how food needs are met; issues with food supply around the world, and consideration of factors which determine what societies and families eat (i.e., taboos, beliefs, rituals, and symbolism surrounding food.) The history of how people have met their food needs and potential future developments are covered. Meets GPSBorder Crossings credit.

FIN 429 GLOBAL FINANCE

Prerequisite: FIN*228, permission of instructor

This course focuses on the global financial environment and particularly on business operations in a global setting. Topics in multinational finance, foreign exchange risk management, financing foreign operations are emphasized. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

FL 220 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite: None

This course critically examines contemporary Latin American Revolutionary literature, in English Translation. Meets Core credit for GPSBorder Crossings.

FREN 252 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

Prerequisite:  FREN*251 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: Not open to students who place into 300 level courses.

A continuation of FREN 251. Lab work required. Taught in French.  Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

HIST 327 AFRICA

Prerequisite:  None

This course focuses on the three major phases of African history: precolonial, colonial, and post-colonial. After an introductory discussion of Africa before the age of Imperialism, the course involves an intensive study of the period of foreign control, followed by a study of the independence movement and the Africa of today. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

HIST 343 MODERN EAST ASIA

Prerequisite: None

In this course, students consider the political, diplomatic, and cultural history of East Asia - specifically Japan, China, Korea, and Vietnam – from roughly 1600 to the present. Of particular interest will be how the civilization of East Asia was transformed in the modern era, mainly as a result of its contract with the West. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

HSCGH 202 GLOBAL CHALLENGES IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Prerequisite:  None

This course explores the challenges of public health from an international perspective through the focused examination of three historical case studies. Students will critically examine both historical and current public health challenges in order to gain a unique understanding of the public health needs of aggregates living in other nations, under differing socioeconomic, political and cultural conditions and the impact of those needs on allocation, constraints, and availability of resources. Meets Core credit for social sciences and International Perspectives requirement.

IS 346 E-COMMERCE

Prerequisite: IS*221; MKT*233 OR MGT*240

This course introduces business, technical, and social legal aspects of using the Internet and Web for business. Basic concepts and models of e-commerce business, technology infrastructure, business concepts and social issues will be discussed. Students will work on a group project that involves the development of a business plan and the design of an e-commerce business using IS skills and knowledge you have obtained.

LTN 310 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I

Prerequisite: LTN*210

This course reviews and confirms knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while also introducing students to Latin authors such as Horace, Cicero, Catullus, or Vergil, through which students will deepen their knowledge of the life, culture, and politics of ancient Rome. Meets Core credit for GPS Value-Added or Border Crossings.

MGT 480 GLOBAL MANAGEMENT

Prerequisite: MGT*240, senior status

The course deals with the strategic management of multinational/translational corporations, focusing on the international environment, competitive strategy formulation, implementation and control along with MNC organization design and structure. Figuring prominently in the course will be comparative management issues related to managing in different international settings, particularly issues that relate to increasing firm competitiveness in the global context. Meets Core credit for GPSBorder Crossings.

MKT 310 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS/CULTURE

Prerequisite: None

Treats the interrelationship of the cultures of other nations with that of the U.S. within a business setting. The first half of the course focuses on cross-cultural relations, using role- playing and cross-cultural awareness games. The second half focuses on the impact of culture on international and multinational business, including such subjects as bribery, morality, and people relations.  Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

MUSIC 226 MUSIC IN WORLD CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

In this course, we journey around the world, exploring how the music of various non-Western peoples intertwine with the beliefs and actions that make up culture. Whether used as a political weapon, a facilitator for spiritual experience, a marker of national identity, or a way to connect otherwise disparate groups, music opens a door to cross-cultural understanding. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

MUSIC 252 TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION: MUSIC AND DRAMA ACROSS CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

Whether you attend a puppet show, a movie, or an opera, and whether you live in New York or New Delhi, you rarely find drama separated from music. This course examines the interaction of music and drama in a variety of cultural traditions, from ancient Chinese opera to the latest Hollywood blockbuster.  Meets Core credit for aesthetics and GPS-Border Crossings.

MUSIC 381 MUSIC HISTORY SEMINAR II

Prerequisite: MUSIC*150 or MUSIC*271 or MUSIC*272 or permission

This seminar focuses on non-Western and popular music's. A variety of topics will be chosen to explore, and students will learn about the major styles, genres, composers, and performers of these music's, as well as the function of these music's in their society. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

POLSC 205 COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Prerequisite: None

This course immerses students in the comparative study of regimes such as liberal democracy, monarchy, tyranny, and theocracy, especially as these are found in historical or contemporary city-states, nations, or empires.  Such study can be comparative either because two or more different regimes are being examined together. In every case, at least two different countries will be studied.  Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

PORT 242 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE II

Prerequisite: PORT*241

A continuation of PORT 241. One-hour per week lab. Taught in Portuguese. Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement.  Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

PSYC 241 CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

Prerequisite:  None

This course offers a broad introduction to the research and theoretical foundations of cross- cultural psychology. The impact of culture on processes mediating psychosocial development, and behavioral patterns will be stressed. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

REL 107  EXPLORING WORLD RELIGIONS

Prerequisite:  None

An introductory exploration of historical developments, beliefs and practices in selected Eastern and Western world religious traditions. Since students will be introduced to methods for analyzing and interpreting sacred texts, college level writing skills are required. Meets Core credit for Religion and GPS-Border Crossings.

REL 250 UNDERSTANDING ISLAM IN TODAY'S WORLD

Prerequisite:  None

An investigation of the basic beliefs and practices in Islam as they are understood and observed in various parts of the world. The course approaches Islam by focusing upon the ways that oral and written traditions combine with cultural factors to create the fabric of contemporary Islamic life.  Meets Core credit for humanities and GPS-Border Crossings.

SM 370 INTERNATIONAL TOURISM

Prerequisite:  None

This course introduces students to the field of international tourism from the political, social, environmental, cultural, and applied (business) perspectives. The course is designed to incorporate both lecture and seminar learning. Meets Core credit for GPS-Border Crossings.

SOCWK 230 GLOBAL HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Prerequisite:  None

This course will explore global social justice issues through the lens of various human rights documents. Issues to be examined include forced labor, war and conflict, and violence against women and children. The history and development of these issues, how culture of individual countries and regions affect the issues and responses, as well as possibilities for the resolution of the issue will be examined. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

SOCWK 330 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN

Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on women's issues from an international perspective and addresses the diversity and similarity of women's experiences worldwide. It considers the scope of gender injustice and the variety of factors (e.g. social, economic, political, religious)that contribute to it. Meets Core credit for social sciences and GPS-Border Crossings.

SPAN 272 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Prerequisite: SPAN*271 or two or more years of high school language study or equivalent. Note: Not open to students who place into 300 level courses.

A continuation of SPAN 271. Lab work required. Taught in Spanish.  Offered annually. Completion fulfills GPS requirement.

Core Curriculum

Ashland University’s core curriculum, consistent with the liberal arts, seeks to develop wisdom and transferable, lifelong skills. Through 11 subject areas and a variety of teaching formats, the core prepares students to think with reason, act with skill and live with values.