Religion Courses

*View a listing of Religion courses in the Undergraduate Catalog

Below are course descriptions of additional "topics" courses (not printed in the catalog) that are available to all undergraduate students.

 

BIBLICAL STUDIES

301K FOUNDATIONS FOR BIBLICAL STUDY: INTRO TO NT GREEK

  • This course is an introduction to the language of the New Testament. Upon completion, students will have an appreciation for the issues involved in advanced textual exegesis, an ability to use scholarly New Testament commentaries and a good foundation for further language study. Students who have passed this course will be able to use their knowledge of Greek in the department’s advanced New Testament courses.
  • One section Fall odd years

301L FOUNDATIONS FOR BIBLICAL STUDY: INTRO TO OT HEBREW

  • This course is an introduction to Old Testament Hebrew. Upon completion, students will have an appreciation for the issues involved in advanced textual exegesis, an ability to use scholarly Old Testament commentaries and a good foundation for further language study. Students who have passed this course will be able to use their knowledge of Hebrew in the department’s advanced Old Testament courses.
  • One section Fall even years

3SG  PAUL IN THE GRECO-ROMAN WORLD

  • Students will explore the social and cultural world of early Christianity by following the travels of the apostle Paul throughout Greece. Special attention will be paid to locations that Paul visited during his second missionary journey as recorded in the Biblical book of Acts. These will be studied in conjunction with Pauline letters written to early Christian communities in Thessalonica, Philippi and Corinth.

3SG  THE LEGACY OF PAUL AND PETER IN ITALY

  • This course combines the literary analysis of early Christian and medieval texts with a ten-day study abroad experience in Italy centering on the cities of Florence, Assisi and Rome. Major theological, cultural and social issues within Roman Catholicism are studied by focusing on the legacies of the apostles Paul and Peter. Students will explore the interrelationship between the Roman Catholic Church and Italian culture through their study of ancient texts, their exposure to early Christian and mediaeval art and their experiences with contemporary religious practices.

THEOLOGY & ETHICS

301 Topics in Religion: RELIGION AND MEDICAL ETHICS

  • This course examines the debates surrounding health and health care in the modern era. Particular attention will be paid to the way in which these debates have been shaped by, and understood within, the Christian tradition. Using concepts, principles, stories, and symbols drawn from Christianity (as well as secular philosophy) we will consider some of the following issues: privacy, confidentiality, the nature of sickness and health, reproductive technology, euthanasia, voluntary termination of life-sustaining treatment, organ transplantation, artificial reproductive technologies, the allocation of health care resources, and genetic engineering/therapy. Meets Tier II credit for humanities requirement.

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

301 Topics in Religion: PRINCIPLES OF PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

  • Christians by definition are theologians—we think about God. Practical Theology thinks about God in relation to the events, relationships and practices of everyday life. The task of practical theology is to figure out what’s going on, why it’s going on, what ought to be going on, and how might we respond more faithfully to what’s going on. This course introduces students to the giants in the field of Practical Theology, some of the basic themes and issues in the area, and the practice of Practical Theology through case studies, readings, discussions and field experiences. Outcomes include knowledge about and awareness of issues and scholars in Practical Theology and skills to practice theology in everyday life. REL208 Exploring Christian Theology is a recommended, not required, preparation for this course.
  • 1 section fall odd years

301 Topics in Religion: PRACTICAL THEOLOGY OF WORSHIP

  • The word liturgy means the work of the people. This course will consider the very practical theology of what work is involved for Christians to worship God in Spirit and in truth. This course examines contemporary practices of worship from various traditions and styles from a global perspective, paying close attention to the underlying theological principles that are implied or explicitly stated. Students will visit a variety of worship services during the semester and will pursue an independent project in the field. Outcomes include ability to understand, analyze, plan and participate more faithfully in a worshipping community.
  • 1 section spring odd years

301 Topics in Religion: SPIRITUALITY

  • This course focuses on various approaches to spirituality and the practice of spiritual disciplines within the Christian tradition. Alternating between theory and practice, students will learn about essential issues in Christian spirituality as they develop their own spiritual experiences. There are no prerequisites for the course; however some previous knowledge of the Bible or Christian theology will be helpful.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

301J Topics in Religion: HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP

  • Starting with the New Testament church and ending with the rapidly growing churches of the new global South, this course examines 2,000 years of Christian history and beliefs that shaped the practice and experience of worship. From plainsong to power praise, and monasticism to seeker sensitive services, this course will attempt to make sense of these changes through the lens of history. The course will include mandatory field trips to religious services from different Christian traditions.
  • 1 section fall odd years

301I GLOBAL EDUCATION - Topics in Religion:THE LEGACY OF PAUL AND PETER IN ITALY

  • This course combines the literary analysis of early Christian and medieval texts with a ten-day study abroad experience in Italy centering on the cities of Florence, Assisi and Rome. Major theological, cultural and social issues within Roman Catholicism are studied by focusing on the legacies of the apostles Paul and Peter. Students will explore the interrelationship between the Roman Catholic Church and Italian culture through their study of ancient texts, their exposure to early Christian and mediaeval art and their experiences with contemporary religious practices.

WORLD RELIGIONS

Currently no topics courses in World Religions