John Moser

Professor of History
Interim Director of the Graduate School
Co-Chair, Master of American History and Government
Building: 
Andrews Hall
Office Number: 
119
Phone: 
419.289.5231

Bio

John Moser is professor of history at Ashland University, where he teaches courses on modern European, American and East Asian history. He did his undergraduate work at Ohio University, and has an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has published numerous works on subjects ranging from comic books to Japanese foreign policy. He is author of three books, the most recent of which is Right Turn: John T. Flynn and the Transformation of American Liberalism, which was published by New York University Press in 2005.

Research Areas

Twentieth Century America
Cold War Society
Reacting to the Past
World War II

Education

Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
B.A., Ohio University

Courses Taught

AHG 607 - America During the Cold War
AHG 505 - The Progressive Era

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty

Jeremy D. Bailey is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston, where he holds a dual appointment in Honors and Political Science.

Bailey’s research interests include executive power, the presidency, and American political thought and development. He is the author of Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007) and coauthor of The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2013 (University Press of Kansas 2013). His articles have been published in American Political Science Review, Review of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, and Publius:The Journal of Federalism. Bailey is now working on a series of coauthored articles on unilateral orders, and a book on James Madison and the problem of constitutional imperfection.

Bailey received his B.A. from Rhodes College and his Ph.D. from Boston College, where his dissertation was the 2004 co-winner of the APSA' s E. E. Schattschneider Prize for best dissertation in American politics. He joined the University of Houston in 2007.