Scott Yenor

Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
Building: 
Ashbrook Center
Office Number: 
801
Phone: 
208.426.1458

Bio

Scott Yenor is Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Boise State University. He teaches courses in political philosophy and has also published on a variety of subjects, including the Scottish Enlightenment, the philosophic status of revealed religion, American literature, and the family in modern political thought. His most recent book, Family Politics: The Idea of Marriage in Modern Political Thought, was published in 2011.

Research Areas

American Political Thought

Education

Ph.D, Loyola University
M.A., Loyola University
B.A., University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Courses Taught

AHG 501 - The American Revolution
AHG 502 - The American Founding
AHG 660 - The Idea of America

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty

David F. Krugler is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, where he has taught since completing his Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1997. He is a historian of the modern United States, with interests in the Cold War, national security, and race relations. His first book, The Voice of America and the Domestic Propaganda Battles, 1945-1953, was published in 2000 by the University of Missouri Press. This Is Only a Test: How Washington, D.C., Prepared for Nuclear War (Palgrave Macmillan) appeared in 2006. Recently, he has completed a book manuscript entitled Making America Safe for Democracy: African Americans’ Fight against Mob Violence after World War I. He has given presentations on this topic at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin; the Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois; and the 2011 annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians. In 2009, the journal, Washington History, published his article “A Mob in Uniform: Soldiers and Civilians in Washington’s Red Summer, 1919.”

Dr. Krugler is the past recipient of research grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Organization of American Historians, and the White House Historical Association. In spring 2011, he was a fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.