Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government

An online Master of Arts program designed for social studies teachers

The fully-online Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government (MASTAHG) offers teachers an integrated program which brings together the resources of Ohio's leading College of Education and the nation's premier liberal arts program for social studies teachers. Available as a fully-online, hybrid online/on-campus, or fully on-campus program, MASTAHG combines high-quality instruction from leading scholars with a flexible format.

Ashland's MASTAHG program is designed to prepare secondary school teachers for the challenge of teaching accelerated courses in American history and US government. The program combines the study of the people, ideas, and events that make up the American experience, with the latest theories in curriculum design and delivery.  This dual approach provides teachers with the expertise they need to effectively deliver college-level instruction at the high school level.

Courses are offered both in a traditional classroom setting at the Ashland main campus, at Ashland's regional centers, and online.  With a combination of online and on-campus study, the program may be completed in about two years.

The Key Facts About MASTAHG

  • May be completed Fully Online
  • Combines coursework in Education and in American History & Government
  • Designed for social studies teachers

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty

Professor Mackubin T. Owens is Professor of National Security Affairs at the United States Naval War College. From 1999 until 2010, he was also Associate Dean of Academics for Electives and Directed Research. He is a Senior Fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI) in Philadelphia, and editor of Orbis, FPRI’s quarterly journal. He specializes in the planning of US strategy and forces, especially naval and power projection forces; the political economy of national security; national security organization; strategic geography; energy security; and American civil-military relations. In addition to the core Naval War College course, he has taught electives on The American Founding, Strategy and Policy of the American Civil War, The Statesmanship of Abraham Lincoln, Sea Power and Maritime Strategy, Strategy and Geography, and US Civil-Military Relations.

Dr. Owens is a contributing editor to National Review Online and a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal, writing primarily on security affairs. His articles have appeared in International Security, Orbis, Armed Forces Journal, Joint Force Quarterly, The Public Interest, The Weekly Standard, Defence Analysis, US Naval Institute Proceedings, Naval War College Review, Marine Corps Gazette, Comparative Strategy, National Review, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Christian Science Monitor, the Jerusalem Post, St. Louis Lawyer, The Washington Times, The Claremont Review of Books, The Dallas Morning News, The New York Post and New York Daily News. He is co-editor of the textbook, Strategy and Force Planning, now in its fourth edition, for which he also wrote the chapters entitled "The Political Economy of National Security," "Thinking About Strategy," and “Strategy and the Logic of Force Planning.” His book, US Civil-Military Bargain after 9/11: Renegotiating the Civil-Millitary Bargain was published in January 2011 by Continuum. He is also completing a book for the University Press of Kentucky tentatively titled Sword of Republican Empire: A History of US Civil-Military Relations.

Before joining the faculty of the War College, Dr. Owens served as National Security Adviser to Senator Bob Kasten, Republican of Wisconsin, and Director of Legislative Affairs for the Nuclear Weapons Programs of the Department of Energy during the Reagan administration. Dr. Owens is also a Marine Corps veteran of Vietnam, where as an infantry platoon commander in 1968-1969, he was wounded twice and awarded the Silver Star medal. He retired from the Marine Corps Reserve as a Colonel in 1994.