Master of Arts in American History and Government

A liberal arts graduate program designed for secondary school social studies teachers

If you are like most social studies teachers, you received training in the methods of effective teacher and classroom management as an undergraduate in a college of education. But, how much time were you able to spend studying the substance of what you teach? How many courses did you take on the actual topics you teach each day, topics like the American founding, the causes and effects of the Civil War, or the role of the progressive movement in shaping the modern United States?

As an educator considering graduate studies, you probably have many master's programs in educational methods available to you at local universities or through distance learning.  But, what if you want to study the people, events, and ideas that shaped the United States, or the the origins and structure of the American political system?  Pursuing a degree in history or political science would likely require you to give up working and perhaps relocate in order to pursue your studies full time.  For most teachers, this is impractical or impossible.

Ashland University's Master of Arts program in American History and Government (MAHG) was designed to address the need of social studies teachers for rigorous graduate-level study in the content of history and government. Offered on a unique schedule of weeklong summer seminars in a traditional classroom setting and live, interactive web-based videoconference courses, each course in the program focuses on the study and interpretation of the materials from which we build our understanding of the past: original historical documents.

The Key Facts About MAHG

  • Hybrid Online/Summer program
  • Focused solely on the study of history and government
  • Appropriate for social studies teachers, community college faculty, and others with a personal or professional interest in history or government

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty
Christopher Flannery is Louaine S. Taylor Professor of American History and Government at Ashland University and Professor of Political Science and the director of the Humanities Program at Azusa Pacific University. He has been a member of the board of directors of the The Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship and Political Philosophy since 1981 and is currently the senior editor of The Claremont Review of Books.