Master of Arts in American History and Government

A liberal arts graduate program designed for secondary school social studies teachers

If you are like most social studies teachers, you received training in the methods of effective teacher and classroom management as an undergraduate in a college of education. But, how much time were you able to spend studying the substance of what you teach? How many courses did you take on the actual topics you teach each day, topics like the American founding, the causes and effects of the Civil War, or the role of the progressive movement in shaping the modern United States?

As an educator considering graduate studies, you probably have many master's programs in educational methods available to you at local universities or through distance learning.  But, what if you want to study the people, events, and ideas that shaped the United States, or the the origins and structure of the American political system?  Pursuing a degree in history or political science would likely require you to give up working and perhaps relocate in order to pursue your studies full time.  For most teachers, this is impractical or impossible.

Ashland University's Master of Arts program in American History and Government (MAHG) was designed to address the need of social studies teachers for rigorous graduate-level study in the content of history and government. Offered on a unique schedule of weeklong summer seminars in a traditional classroom setting and live, interactive web-based videoconference courses, each course in the program focuses on the study and interpretation of the materials from which we build our understanding of the past: original historical documents.

The Key Facts About MAHG

  • Hybrid Online/Summer program
  • Focused solely on the study of history and government
  • Appropriate for social studies teachers, community college faculty, and others with a personal or professional interest in history or government

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty

Gregory Schneider is Professor of History at Emporia State University, where he has taught since 1998. He teaches courses in modern American history, the 1960s, diplomatic history, the history of railroads, and the history of conservatism. His research interests lie in the history of American conservatism. He has published five books: Cadres for Conservatism: Young Americans for Freedom and the Rise of the Contemporary Right (NYU Press, 1999); Conservatism in America since 1930: A Reader (NYU Press, 2003); Equality, Decadence and Modernity: The Collected Essays of Stephen J. Tonsor (ISI Books, 2005); The Conservative Century: From Reaction to Revolution (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008); and Rock Island Requiem: The Collapse of a Mighty Fine Line (University Press of Kansas, 2013).

He is married and has two children and a Catahoula Leopard dog. His hobbies include model railroading, real railroading, the Chicago White Sox, and the Chicago Bears.