Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government

An online Master of Arts program designed for social studies teachers

The fully-online Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government (MASTAHG) offers teachers an integrated program which brings together the resources of Ohio's leading College of Education and the nation's premier liberal arts program for social studies teachers. Available as a fully-online, hybrid online/on-campus, or fully on-campus program, MASTAHG combines high-quality instruction from leading scholars with a flexible format.

Ashland's MASTAHG program is designed to prepare secondary school teachers for the challenge of teaching accelerated courses in American history and US government. The program combines the study of the people, ideas, and events that make up the American experience, with the latest theories in curriculum design and delivery.  This dual approach provides teachers with the expertise they need to effectively deliver college-level instruction at the high school level.

Courses are offered both in a traditional classroom setting at the Ashland main campus, at Ashland's regional centers, and online.  With a combination of online and on-campus study, the program may be completed in about two years.

The Key Facts About MASTAHG

  • May be completed Fully Online
  • Combines coursework in Education and in American History & Government
  • Designed for social studies teachers

Faculty Spotlight

Faculty

Marc Landy is the Edward and Louise Peterson Professor of American History and Government at Ashland University and Professor of Political Science at Boston College. With Sidney Milkis, he is the author of Presidential Greatness (2000) and a textbook, American Government: Balancing Liberty and Democracy, now in its third edition (2011). He is an author of The Environmental Protection Agency From Nixon to Clinton: Asking the Wrong Questions (1994), with Stephen Thomas. He is an editor of Creating Competitive Markets: The Politics and Economics of Regulatory Reform (2007); Seeking the Center: Politics and Policymaking at the New Century (2001); and The New Politics of Public Policy (1995). His recent articles include: "Terror and the Executive," National Affairs, Spring 2010; EPA and Nanotechnology: The Need for a Grand Bargain?, in Christopher J. Bosso, ed., Governing Uncertainty: Environmental Regulation in the Age of Nanotechnology (Washington DC: RFF Press, 2010); (Sidney Milkis, co-author), The Presidency in the Eye of the Storm, The Presidency and the Political System, Ninth Edition (2010); "Mega-Disasters and Federalism," Public Administration Review, Vol. 68, Issue 6, October 2008; and "Great Presidents are Agents of Democratic Change," in Richard Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds., Debating the Presidency, CQ Press, 2006.