Fall 2013

Live Online Courses

Fall 2013 Session 1 (Online) - August 17 to October 10

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2) **CLOSED**

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald, United States Military Academy

Schedule: Thursdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2) **CLOSED**

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dan Monroe, Millikin University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2) **CLOSED**

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett, Ashland University

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:15 pm to 7:00 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 605 O1A: Age of Enterprise (2) **CLOSED**

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructor: Michael Schwarz, Ashland University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 610 O1A: American Foreign Policy Since 1898 (2)  **RESCHEDULED**

This course examines the international relations of the United States from the Spanish-American War to 9/11. The twentieth century marked the rise of the nation to a superpower with a myriad of global interests and commitments. Accordingly, students will examine foreign policy's part in this rise, with special attention to the ways in which the principles and practices of democracy and capitalism have shaped American foreign policy. Topics will include the nation's acquisition of overseas territory and colonies, the influence of Wilsonianism and America's entry into the world wars, and the Cold War.

Instructor: David Krugler, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Schedule: Rescheduled for Session 2 (October 12 to December 7)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 633 O1A: The American Presidency II—Johnson to the present (2) **CLOSED**

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructor: Jeremy Bailey, University of Houston

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Fall 2013 Session 2 (Online) - October 12 to December 7

AHG 502 O2A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Scott Yenor, Boise State University

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials

AHG 504 O2A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Mackubin T. Owens, US Naval War College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials

AHG 510 O2A: Great American Texts–Frederick Douglass (2)

To reflect on the life of Frederick Douglass is to be reminded of the famous self-description attributed to his great contemporary, Mark Twain: “I am not an American; I am the American.” A classic self-made man, Douglass, like his country, rose from a low beginning to a great height; he gained freedom by his own virtue and against great odds in a revolutionary struggle; and he matured into an internationally renowned apostle of universal liberty. In this course, we consider Douglass’ telling of his own story, taking as primary texts his three autobiographies: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881; 1892). We will find in these texts not only the annals of an unforgettable life but also Douglass’ reflections on enduring issues in American political thought such as the nature and specific evil of slavery, the nature and grounds of human rights and freedom, and the meaning and mission of the American Republic.

Instructor: Peter C. Myers, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Schedule: Mondays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts–American Lives (2)

This seminar will examine four great American autobiographies: Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and Calvin Coolidge. As we examine these works, we will examine the author's understanding of self-government, American political principles, the American mind, and the American character.

Instructor: Peter W. Schramm, Ashland University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials

AHG 601 O2A: Sources of the American Regime (2)

This course examines the European heritage of ideas and arguments upon which the American Founders drew as they devised a new government for the United States.

Instructor: Jeffrey Sikkenga, Ashland University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials

AHG 610 O2A: American Foreign Policy Since 1898 (2)

This course examines the international relations of the United States from the Spanish-American War to 9/11. The twentieth century marked the rise of the nation to a superpower with a myriad of global interests and commitments. Accordingly, students will examine foreign policy's part in this rise, with special attention to the ways in which the principles and practices of democracy and capitalism have shaped American foreign policy. Topics will include the nation's acquisition of overseas territory and colonies, the influence of Wilsonianism and America's entry into the world wars, and the Cold War.

Instructor: David Krugler, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 622 O2A: Religion in American History and Politics (2)

From the time that the first Europeans arrived in America, religion has been an important part of American life. This course examines the various ways in which religion has played a role in American history, with particular emphasis on the role of religion in American politics.

Instructor: Ken Masugi, Johns Hopkins University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials

Research Methods

AHG 690 - Research Methods - Fall 2013

Students planning to complete their degree via the Thesis or Capstone Project tracks should enroll in AHG 690/Research Methods around the time they will complete 20 semester credit hours. AHG 690 is meets once for about two hours as a group. The student then works one-on-one with the instructor to develop a thesis or capstone project proposal. The course is complete when the student has received approval for their proposal.

Students will not formally register, pay, or receive a grade for AHG 690 until they have completed the course. No money is due at this time. Additionally, there is no obligation to remain on the thesis or capstone project track once a student begins AHG 690. Students are free to switch to the exam track at any time.

Schedule:

AHG 690 Research Methods (Online): Saturday, August 24th at 10:00 am Eastern time.

For more information or to begin Research Methods, contact Professor David Tucker at dtucker@ashbrook.org.

Comprehensive Examination

Comprehensive Examination - Fall 2013

The Fall 2013 Comprehensive Examination for MAHG and MASTAHG degree candidates will feature five questions. Candidates will respond to any three of these questions in an extended essay format.

Schedule:

Exam questions released: Friday, November 1st at noon Eastern
Student responses due: Monday, November 18th at noon Eastern
Students informed of results: Week of December 2nd

Students who have completed 32 semester credit hours or are enrolled in their final course may register to take the exam.