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Spring 2014

American History & Government Courses

Spring 2014 Session 2 (Online) - March 8 to May 3

AHG 501 O2A: The American Revolution (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: David Tucker, Naval Postgraduate School

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 10:00 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 504 O2A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Dan Monroe, Millikin University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 504 O2B: Civil War and Reconstruction (2) 

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Stephen Tootle, College of the Sequoias

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 631 O2A: American Political Rhetoric (2)

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches of leading statesmen, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, and Ronald Reagan. We will pay close attention to these primary sources as the means of teaching the great political controversies of American history.

Instructor: Ken Masugi, Johns Hopkins University

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 632 O2A: The American Presidency I–Washington to Lincoln (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: Stephen Knott, U.S. Naval War College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2A: The American Western (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course is an intensive study of several classic American Westerns, in both print and film. The American Western reflects something fundamental about both the American mind and the American regime. The Western’s emphasis on courage and self-reliance, for example, arises from that same American character that forms the basis of self-government. The American Western also raises important questions central to American political life, among which are the meaning of justice, equality, and liberty. This course will also address the question of how American politics both influences and is influenced by literature in the Western genre.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett, Ashland University

Schedule: Thursdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2B: The Idea of America (2) **SECTION CLOSED**

The Land of Opportunity. The World’s Policeman. The Arsenal of Democracy. The Last, Best Hope of Mankind. Novus Ordo Seclorum. The Great Satan. Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Amerika. The Melting Pot. These, and several other sobriquets are meant to capture the essence of what America is or what America is said to represent. However illuminating these sobriquets are, there can be no better guide to understanding our democracy than Alexis de Tocqueville. Lest Democracy in America be more frequently cited than read and understood, this course seeks to grasp this book in all of its nuance and depth by making it the centerpiece of our encounter with the ideas of America and then we shall investigate the unraveling of the Tocquevillian consensus during the Twentieth Century.

Instructor: Scott Yenor, Boise State University

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 660 O2C: Citizen and Immigrant (2) **SECTION CLOSED**

This seminar will examine the distinctive and noble character of American citizenship. Our citizenship is grounded in the natural rights of mankind--the electric cord that binds us, as Lincoln called it--and guarded by a written constitution. We have always received the stranger, both respectable and persecuted. We have generously extended--more generously than any other country--the privileges of citizenship on an equal basis with the original inhabitants.

Instructor: Peter Schramm, Ashland University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Spring 2014 Session 1 (Online) - January 6 to March 1

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: J. David Alvis, Wofford College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Eric Sands, Berry College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2) **SECTION CLOSED**

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto, University of Dallas

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts–Raymond Chandler (2)  *SECTION CLOSED**

This course examines some of the most well-known writings and films of Raymond Chandler, whom Evelyn Waugh, in the late 1940s, called ''the greatest living American novelist.'' Chandler wrote seven novels (some made into films), and in each of them his hero is private detective Philip Marlowe and the setting is Los Angeles in the 1930s and 40s. Chandler's hard-boiled crime fiction is distinctly American; he wrote in what he called “the American language”; he said of his hero that he is “the American mind”; and the image he created of the "mean streets" of Los Angeles says much about American society and the American Dream.

Instructor: Christopher Flannery, Azusa Pacific University

Schedule: Mondays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O1B: Great American Texts–George F. Kennan (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

George Frost Kennan (1904-2005) is best known as a theorist and practitioner of U.S. foreign relations and his ideas shaped US-Soviet relations in the post-war period. However, he was also a remarkable man of letters, with a broad education, a perceptive eye, and an insightful mind. In this course we will trace Kennan's extraordinary life by studying his most noteworthy works, and explore how his ideas shaped the emergence of the United States as a world power.

Instructor: John Moser, Ashland University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus There is no Course Packet for this course

AHG 604 O1A: The Early Republic (2)  **SECTION CLOSED**

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals. In particular, the debates of the Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian factions, and the political parties that formed around them, are examined.

Instructor: Jeremy Bailey, University of Houston

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no Course Packet for this course.

Research Methods

AHG 690 - Research Methods - Spring 2014

AHG 690 A: Research Methods (2)

Students planning to complete their degree via the Thesis or Capstone Project tracks should enroll in AHG 690/Research Methods around the time they will complete 20 semester credit hours. AHG 690 is meets once for about two hours as a group. The student then works one-on-one with the instructor to develop a thesis or capstone project proposal. The course is complete when the student has received approval for their proposal.

Tuition is due for AHG 690 no later than the date of the student's attendance at the first group meeting. Tuition is charged at the then current on-campus tuition rate regardless of the format in which AHG 690 is taken. Once the student attends the group session the student is committeed to AHG 690 and no refund of tuition is available should the student later withdraw from AHG 690 to pursue the comprehensive exam option.

Schedule:

AHG 690 Research Methods (Online): TBA

Register

For more information about the course and upcoming sessions please contact Professor David Tucker at dtucker@ashbrook.org.

Comprehensive Examination

AHG 693 - Comprehensive Examination - Spring 2014

AHG 693 A: Comprehensive Examination (0)

The Spring 2014 Comprehensive Examination for MAHG and MASTAHG degree candidates will feature five questions. Candidates will respond to any three of these questions in an extended essay format.

Schedule:

Exam questions released: Friday, April 11th at noon Eastern
Student responses due: Monday, April 28th at noon Eastern
Students informed of results: Week of May 5th

Students who have completed 32 semester credit hours or are enrolled in their final course may register to take the exam.

MASTAHG Education Courses

Spring 2014 (Online) - January 6 to April 4

EDCI 522 OL1: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Classroom (3)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course provides teachers with an overview of how theoretical and curricular foundations have evolved to form the current 21st century model of classroom instruction. It provides practical instruction on how key technologies are being utilized to meet the needs of the 21st century student. Instructors provide a theoretical framework for technology integration that find praxis with critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation. The meshing of instructional methods, curriculum, and technology are the thematic focal points of content with a practical emphasis on learning how these technologies work. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

Instructor: Deanna Romano, Ashland University

EDCI 522 OL2: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Classroom (3)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course provides teachers with an overview of how theoretical and curricular foundations have evolved to form the current 21st century model of classroom instruction. It provides practical instruction on how key technologies are being utilized to meet the needs of the 21st century student. Instructors provide a theoretical framework for technology integration that find praxis with critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation. The meshing of instructional methods, curriculum, and technology are the thematic focal points of content with a practical emphasis on learning how these technologies work. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

Instructor: Deanna Romano, Ashland University

EDCI 533 OL1: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners: Social, Historical, and Legal Issues Related to the Education of English Language Learners (3)  **SECTION CLOSED**

While it is aptly suited for every teacher in our diverse classrooms, this course is required for candidates seeking Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Endorsement. This course explores historical, social, and policy issues surrounding the education of diverse learners particularly English Language and limited English proficient learners in K-12 settings in the U.S. With the population changes and demographics realities of the 21st Century, educational professionals will be better prepared by investigating theories and themes of cultural identity, intragroup differences, migration, language use, and how these factors intersect with school performance. This course will emphasize the roles of school in collaboration with family and community structures to elicit strengths and enhance positive outcomes for students. This course meets the Diversity standard for the MASTAHG core. Field/Clinical Hours: 20.

Instructor: Rosaire Ifedi, Ashland University

EDFN 502 OL1: Critical Dialogues in the Teaching and Learning Professions (3) **SECTION CLOSED**

Critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical discourse analysis emerged following World War I in Europe, and entered American education from the 1970s onward. Through these perspectives, education professions can learn to identify sources of socio-cultural power that shape, control, limit and empower the practice of education as an institution of culture. The perception of the classroom teacher by society, individual communities, and the teachers themselves is shaped by a complex intersection of political power, economics, gender and sexual discourses, and historical meta-narratives. This course will provide an overview of these discourses through the lens of critical theory to discuss the nature and characteristics of the teaching profession in contemporary U.S. schooling. This course meets the Diversity standard for the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Nate Myers, Ashland University

EDFN 503 OL1: School and Society (2) **SECTION CLOSED**

School and Society is a course designed for students to reflect on antecedents of the current educational system (philosophical, political, economic, and social influences which have shaped it) and societal interactions which continue to affect it. Using this understanding, students will focus on the role of the educator in developing schools as educational communities. This course meets the requirements for the Social and Historical standard in the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Cathryn Chappell, Ashland University

EDFN 507 OL1: Understanding Statistical Research for Classroom Professionals (3)  **SECTION CLOSED**

This course is designed to prepare non-mathematicians to critique and understand statistical research and research designs as they apply to classroom and school practices. Students will analyze a variety of research questions in education and learn to follow these questions through relevant research studies, to learn how to structure links between research and practice that are reasonable, and that protect and justify the experiential knowledge of education professionals. This course meets the requirements of the Inquiry standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Howard Walters, Ashland University

EDFN 510 OL1: The World in Your Classroom: Multicultural and Global Education (3) **SECTION CLOSED**

The goal of this course is to equip educators with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to implement multicultural curricular and pedagogical strategies, thereby enabling them to meet the diverse learning needs of all students. By developing multicultural competence, using culturally relevant instruction and pedagogy, and practicing culturally responsive teaching, educators will improve their ability to positively impact student achievement both individually, and holistically. Also, by developing an understanding of the prevailing conditions, developments, and trends associated with world educational issues, educators will be equipped to prepare their students for the increasingly globalized world. This course satisfies the Diversity requirement of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Cathryn Chappell, Ashland University

EDIS 550 OL1: Social and Educational Perspectives of Disability (3)  **SECTION CLOSED**

The application of a deficit model to define and respond to individuals with disabilities in schools contributes to community marginalization and social stigmatization. This class focuses upon the interpretative framework of the perceptions and implications of disability within society and the educational community. It will utilize diverse perspectives to explore how the construct of disability impacts the community identity and participation rights of individuals with disabilities. The promotion of socially just practices will be explored. This course meets the requirements of the Diversity standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Allison P. Dickey, Ashland University

EDIS 579 OL1: Special Education Law, Policies, and Procedures (3) **SECTION CLOSED**

The class covers the interpretive framework encompassing recent judicial decisions that emphasize inclusion for students with disabilities. Students review the American legal system and laws governing special education at federal and state levels and address issues from a teaching perspective. The course includes procedures specific to programs for learners with need for educational intervention. It also addresses topics such as relationships between school personnel and parents, funding sources, consultative procedures, interpersonal communication skills, enhancing team performance, and cultural and linguistic diversity. This course meets the requirements of the Social and Historical standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Carla R. Abreu-Ellis, Ashland University