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Summer 2014

American History & Government Courses

On-Campus Courses

Summer 2014 Session 1 (On-Campus) - June 22 to June 27

AHG 502 1A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Guest Lecturer: Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Course Materials:

AHG 633 1A: The American Presidency II - Johnson to the present (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructors: Jeremy Bailey (University of Houston) and Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

Course Materials:

AHG 641 1A: The Supreme Court (2)

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court's power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructors: Eric Sands (Berry College) and Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 2 (On-Campus) - June 29 to July 4

AHG 510 2A: Great American Texts - Democracy in America (2)

Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America is commonly regarded as the most profound study of America ever written. Seeing "in America more than America," Tocqueville studies America to understand the nature of modern democracy itself. In the course of his discussion, he examines, among many other subjects, America's democratic social condition, its constitutional federalism, the problem of majority tyranny in America, the troubled relations among its racial groups, the prevailing understanding of sexual equality, the relation of religion and government, the powerful love of material well-being, and the dangers of administrative centralization and "mild despotism." This course will examine Tocqueville's treatments of these and other subjects in extensive excerpts from his book, all with a larger view toward understanding his descriptive account of democracy in America, his analysis of the main dangers it faces, and his suggestions as to the proper remedies for those dangers-the means for preserving and enhancing liberty in a nation dedicated to the principle of political and social equality.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

AHG 603 2A: Colonial America (2)

This course focuses on the development of an indigenous political culture in the British colonies. It pays special attention to the development of representative political institutions and how these emerged through the confrontation between colonists and King and proprietors. The course also considers imperial politics through a study of the Albany Plan of Union.

Instructors: David Tucker (Naval Postgraduate School) and Sarah Morgan Smith (Rutgers University)

Course Materials:

AHG 660 2A: The West and America (2)

How has Western history framed and reflected American history and how has American history framed and reflected Western history? This course will examine the history of the western United States from the nineteenth century era of expansion to the present day, focusing on the impact of national events on the development of the west as well as the role the west played in shaping modern America. Topics of study will include events such as the industrial revolution, the Indian wars, World War I, and reform movements, as well as relevant contemporary topics such as mass incarceration, California and its decline, borderlands, and immigration. The course will shed light on how regional history shapes national history and offer the student the ability to compare and contrast how the region they are from has contributed to the national story.

Instructors: Gregory Schneider (Emporia State University) and David Wrobel (University of Oklahoma)

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 3 (On-Campus) - July 6 to July 11

AHG 503 3A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors: Dan Monroe (Millikin University) and John Moser (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

AHG 504 3A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors: Lucas Morel (Washington & Lee University) and Jonathan White (Christopher Newport University)

Course Materials:

AHG 630 3A: American Statesmen - Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Ronald Reagan (2)

Even though the powers of the American Executive are controlled and limited, extraordinary acts of statesmanship are possible. This seminar examines those presidents who have demonstrated extraordinary political leadership. We will examine such statesmen and the political circumstances in which their prudence revealed itself. Among those examined will be Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt. With the permission of the Chair, this course may be taken more than once.

Instructors: Steven Hayward (University of Colorado) and Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 4 (On-Campus) - July 13 to July 18

AHG 501 4A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Michael Schwarz (Ashland University) and Natalie Taylor (Skidmore College)

Course Materials:

AHG 510 4B: Great American Texts - Abraham Lincoln (2)

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln's political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln's understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructors: Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University) and Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

AHG 505 4A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University) and Paul Moreno (Hillsdale College)

Course Materials:

AHG 611 4A: The American Way of War (2)

The course examines how Americans have used military force, focusing on the relationship between civilian and military leaders, characteristic strategic approaches, and the connection between our political principles and our military practices.

Instructors: David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville) and Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Course Materials:

Online Courses

Summer 2014 Session 1 (Online) - June 9 to June 19

AHG 502 O1B: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Melanie Marlowe (Miami University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O1C: Great American Texts - The Federalist (2)

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss The Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 2 (Online) - June 23 to July 3

AHG 501 O2B: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 3 (Online) - July 7 to July 17

AHG 660 O3B: The 1960s (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course examines the major events of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations as well as the political, social, and cultural changes that took place between 1960-1974.  This class is taught primarily through the close examination of documents with an emphasis on the changes that took place in the American political tradition within that period.

Instructors: Stephen Tootle (College of the Sequioas)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Summer 2014 Session 4 (Online) - July 21 to July 31

AHG 504 O4B: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O4B: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Research Methods

AHG 690 - Research Methods - Summer 2014

AHG 690 A: Research Methods (2)

Students planning to complete their degree via the Thesis or Capstone Project tracks should enroll in AHG 690/Research Methods around the time they will complete 20 semester credit hours. AHG 690 is meets once for about two hours as a group. The student then works one-on-one with the instructor to develop a thesis or capstone project proposal. The course is complete when the student has received approval for their proposal.

Tuition is charged at the prevailing on-campus tutition rate regardless of the format in which the student takes AHG 690. Once a student attends the first course meeting, either online or on-campus, tuition is due. While the student remains free to withdraw from AHG 690 and switch to the Comprehensive Exam track, tution paid for AHG 690 will not be refunded or credited to the student.

Schedule:

AHG 690 Research Methods (Online): TBA

AHG 690 Research Methods (On-Campus): TBA

Register

For more information, contact Professor David Tucker at dtucker@ashbrook.org.

Comprehensive Examination

AHG 693 - Comprehensive Examination - Summer 2014

AHG 693 A: Comprehensive Examination (0)

The Spring 2014 Comprehensive Examination for MAHG and MASTAHG degree candidates will feature five questions. Candidates will respond to any three of these questions in an extended essay format.

Schedule:

Exam questions released: Friday, July 11th at noon Eastern
Student responses due: Monday, July 28th at noon Eastern
Students informed of results: Week of August 4th

Students who have completed 32 semester credit hours or are enrolled in their final course may register to take the exam.

MASTAHG Education Courses

Online Courses

Summer 2014 Term X - May 12 to June 13, 2014 (Online)

EDCI 522 OL1X: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Classroom (3)  ** CLOSED **

This course provides teachers with an overview of how theoretical and curricular foundations have evolved to form the current 21st century model of classroom instruction. It provides practical instruction on how key technologies are being utilized to meet the needs of the 21st century student. Instructors provide a theoretical framework for technology integration that find praxis with critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation. The meshing of instructional methods, curriculum, and technology are the thematic focal points of content with a practical emphasis on learning how these technologies work. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

Instructor: Marian Maxfield, Ashland University

EDFN 506 OL1X: Qualitative Research (3) ** CLOSED **

This course acquaints students with a qualitative inquiry. In addition to providing an introduction to the theoretical perspectives informing qualitative research, the course focuses on techniques for and issues of gathering, analyzing, and reporting qualitative data. The social and ethical issues of research are emphasized. This course meets the Inquiry standard for the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Nate Myers, Ashland University

EDFN 510 OL1X: The World in Your Classroom: Multicultural and Global Education (3) ** CLOSED **

The goal of this course is to equip educators with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to implement multicultural curricular and pedagogical strategies, thereby enabling them to meet the diverse learning needs of all students. By developing multicultural competence, using culturally relevant instruction and pedagogy, and practicing culturally responsive teaching, educators will improve their ability to positively impact student achievement both individually, and holistically. Also, by developing an understanding of the prevailing conditions, developments, and trends associated with world educational issues, educators will be equipped to prepare their students for the increasingly globalized world. This course satisfies the Diversity requirement of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Cathryn Chappell, Ashland University

EDFN 521 OL1X: Theory and Practice of Curriculum Development (3) ** CLOSED **

Students examine the impact of curriculum theories and practices, including contemporary curriculum discourses; technology utilization and management; major groups and individuals in society who influence curriculum; trends and innovations in curriculum, approaches to evaluation of curriculum experiences; professional techniques of curriculum development; and the role of students, teachers, administrators, scholars, parents, and other groups in shaping curriculum. Current literature and research are emphasized. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

Instructor: Nate MyersAshland University

EDIS 550 OL1X: Social and Educational Perspectives of Disability (3)  ** CLOSED **

The application of a deficit model to define and respond to individuals with disabilities in schools contributes to community marginalization and social stigmatization. This class focuses upon the interpretative framework of the perceptions and implications of disability within society and the educational community. It will utilize diverse perspectives to explore how the construct of disability impacts the community identity and participation rights of individuals with disabilities. The promotion of socially just practices will be explored. This course meets the requirements of the Diversity standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Allison P. Dickey, Ashland University

Summer 2014 Term Y - June 16 to July 11, 2014 (Online)

EDCI 522 OL1Y: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Classroom (3)

This course provides teachers with an overview of how theoretical and curricular foundations have evolved to form the current 21st century model of classroom instruction. It provides practical instruction on how key technologies are being utilized to meet the needs of the 21st century student. Instructors provide a theoretical framework for technology integration that find praxis with critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation. The meshing of instructional methods, curriculum, and technology are the thematic focal points of content with a practical emphasis on learning how these technologies work. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

InstructorMarian Maxfield, Ashland University

EDFN 502 OL1Y: Critical Dialogues in the Teaching and Learning Professions (3)  ** CLOSED **

Critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical discourse analysis emerged following World War I in Europe, and entered American education from the 1970s onward. Through these perspectives, education professions can learn to identify sources of socio-cultural power that shape, control, limit and empower the practice of education as an institution of culture. The perception of the classroom teacher by society, individual communities, and the teachers themselves is shaped by a complex intersection of political power, economics, gender and sexual discourses, and historical meta-narratives. This course will provide an overview of these discourses through the lens of critical theory to discuss the nature and characteristics of the teaching profession in contemporary U.S. schooling. This course meets the Diversity standard for the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Nate Myers, Ashland University

EDFN 503 OL1Y: School and Society (2) ** CLOSED **

School and Society is a course designed for students to reflect on antecedents of the current educational system (philosophical, political, economic, and social influences which have shaped it) and societal interactions which continue to affect it. Using this understanding, students will focus on the role of the educator in developing schools as educational communities. This course meets the requirements for the Social and Historical standard in the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Cathryn Chappell, Ashland University

EDFN 506 OL1Y: Qualitative Research (3) ** CLOSED **

This course acquaints students with a qualitative inquiry. In addition to providing an introduction to the theoretical perspectives informing qualitative research, the course focuses on techniques for and issues of gathering, analyzing, and reporting qualitative data. The social and ethical issues of research are emphasized. This course meets the Inquiry standard for the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Nate Myers, Ashland University

EDIS 550 OL1Y: Social and Educational Perspectives of Disability (3) ** CLOSED **

The application of a deficit model to define and respond to individuals with disabilities in schools contributes to community marginalization and social stigmatization. This class focuses upon the interpretative framework of the perceptions and implications of disability within society and the educational community. It will utilize diverse perspectives to explore how the construct of disability impacts the community identity and participation rights of individuals with disabilities. The promotion of socially just practices will be explored. This course meets the requirements of the Diversity standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Allison P. Dickey, Ashland University

EDIS 579 OL1Y: Special Education Law, Policies, and Procedures (3)  ** CLOSED **

The class covers the interpretive framework encompassing recent judicial decisions that emphasize inclusion for students with disabilities. Students review the American legal system and laws governing special education at federal and state levels and address issues from a teaching perspective. The course includes procedures specific to programs for learners with need for educational intervention. It also addresses topics such as relationships between school personnel and parents, funding sources, consultative procedures, interpersonal communication skills, enhancing team performance, and cultural and linguistic diversity. This course meets the requirements of the Social and Historical standard of the MASTAHG core.

Instructor: Carla R. Abreu-Ellis, Ashland University

Summer 2014 Term Z - July 14 to August 8, 2014 (Online)

EDCI 522 OL1Z: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Classroom (3)  ** CLOSED **

This course provides teachers with an overview of how theoretical and curricular foundations have evolved to form the current 21st century model of classroom instruction. It provides practical instruction on how key technologies are being utilized to meet the needs of the 21st century student. Instructors provide a theoretical framework for technology integration that find praxis with critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation. The meshing of instructional methods, curriculum, and technology are the thematic focal points of content with a practical emphasis on learning how these technologies work. This course meets the requirements for the Curriculum Foundations standard in the MASTAHG Core.

InstructorMarian Maxfield, Ashland University

Course Dates: July 14, 2014 through August 8, 2014

Hybrid and Classroom-based Education Courses

Summer 2014 Terms X, Y, and Z

Additional education courses are available in both hybrid online/on-campus and traditional in-person formats at the Ashland University main campus (Ashland, Ohio), Columbus Center (Columbus, Ohio), Eylria Center (Elyria, Ohio), Cleveland Center (Independence, Ohio), and Stark Center (Massillon, Ohio). A complete schedule of in-person and hybrid courses is available at the College of Education M.Ed. website. MASTAHG students may regsiter for online education courses at the MASTAHG website. Please contact the MASTAHG program office by phone at (419) 289-5411 or by email at mast-ahg@ashland.edu to register for hybrid and in-person courses.