Events

Oct
1
Set against the national debate over the United States’ energy...Read more
Oct
16
As the author of American Homicide and Child Murder in...Read more
Oct
22
Book Discussion: Our Kids-The American Dream in Crisis. Dauch 115...Read more
Nov
6
For most of the 20th century, government agents systematically forced...Read more
Nov
13
Erasing the Battle Lines: Finding a Path to Peace At...Read more

2019-2020 Event Schedule

 

  • Oct
    1

     View of downtown Pittsburgh

    Set against the national debate over the United States’ energy future — and the explosive decision to exit the Paris Climate Agreement — ’Paris to Pittsburgh’ captures what’s at stake for communities around the country and the inspiring ways Americans are responding. A panel discussion will follow.

    Presented by the College of Arts & Sciences Symposium Against Indifference
    Co-Sponsored by the Ashland Center for Nonviolence

  • Oct
    16

     A Global View"

    As the author of American Homicide and Child Murder in America, presenter Randolph Roth will present his findings on the causes and consequences of inequality, globally and within societies, with special attention to the question of why inequality had risen so rapidly since 1980 in the United States, Great Britain, Canada and Australia, but not in the rest of the affluent world. The answer bears heavily on the question of liberty versus responsibility.

    Presented by the CAS Symposium Against Indifference
    Co-Sponsored by the Ashland Center for Nonviolence

  • Oct
    22

     The American Dream in Crisis" by Robert Putnam

    Book Discussion: Our Kids-The American Dream in Crisis. Dauch 115. October 22, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

  • Nov
    6

    Dawnland movie poster

    For most of the 20th century, government agents systematically forced Native children from their homes and placed them with white families. Many children suffered devastating emotional harm by adults who shamed and demeaned them, and tried to erase their culture. In Maine the fallout was unbearable. ‘Dawnland’ tells the story of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the first in the U.S. to address Native issues. For over two years, Native and non-Native commissioners traveled across Maine to hear testimony and bear witness to the dramatic impact of the state’s child welfare practices on Wabanaki families. Dawnland takes viewers to Wabanaki communities and inside the truth commission as it grapples with the meaning of truth, reconciliation, racial healing, tribal autonomy, and child welfare system reform. A panel discussion will follow.

    Presented by the CAS Symposium Against Indifference.

  • Nov
    13

    Erasing the Battle Lines: Finding a Path to Peace

    Veterans for Peace

    At 7:00 pm in the Trustees Room in the upper level of the John C. Myers Convocation Center, Mary Reynolds Powell and Ian Y. Yee, members of Veterans for Peace, Chapter 39 Northeastern Ohio, will present “Erasing the Battle Lines: Finding a Path to Peace.” The program will include a selection of letters from those who have been impacted by American wars: friend and foe, civilian and military. Following this, Mary and Ian will share brief descriptions of their personal journeys from their military experiences to Veterans for Peace. A question and answer period will allow for group conversation.

    Mary Reynolds Powell, graduated from Columbia University School of Nursing in August,1969. The US Army provided significant financial assistance during her senior year, which committed her to a two-year tour after graduation. In 1970-71, she served as a Captain at the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam. In April 2000, Mary released A World of Hurt: Between Innocence and Arrogance in Vietnam, an account of her own experience in Vietnam that includes the stories of several friends who served with her. It describes a war “winding down” while thousands still died. In 2005, it was published in Israel as only the second book in Hebrew about the war in Vietnam. She has lectured at high schools and colleges and spoken to professional, religious and civic groups around the country.

    “Ian” Yiu-Man Yee received his B.A. in Philosophy after receiving his honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy. During his active duty enlistment, he deployed twice to the Middle East/South West Asia/Arabian Gulf/Persian Gulf. His sister was also a U.S. Air Force officer who was deployed for all of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm

  • Feb
    29

    6th Annual John D. Stratton Conference logo

    Satruday, February 29th, 2020 in the Dausch College of Business at Ashland University

    Registration is open through 2/26. Click here to register now!

  • Mar
    25

    Rita Brock

    "Moral Injury and Soul Repair."

    Rita Brock is Senior Vice President, Moral Injury and Director of the Shay Moral Injury Center Volunteers of America. She leads the organization’s efforts to deepen understanding about moral injury in the many populations who experience it. The center builds on Volunteers of America’s work, spanning more than a century, of helping veterans and others who live with this emotional trauma.

    A noted theologian, Dr. Brock was the Founding Director of the Soul Repair Center at Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, where she also was a Research Professor of Theology and Culture. She is co-author of Soul Repair: Recovering from Moral Injury after War, Beacon Press, 2012, and Proverbs of Ashes: Violence, Redemptive Suffering and the Search for What Saves Us, Beacon Press, 2001. She is a leading national expert on moral injury in combat veterans and has offered trainings for VA mental health providers, for professional chaplains, and for veterans and their families.

    In her first master’s degree, Dr. Brock studied youth development, psychology of religion, and pastoral counseling and was employed as a youth minister. From 1974 to 1988, Dr. Brock was Protestant chaplain for a high school level, human relations and justice, summer-school program in Los Angeles County called Brotherhood/Sisterhood USA, administered by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. In addition, from 1979-1981, she served as Assistant Chaplain and Instructor in Religion at Chapman University.

    For 18 years, Dr. Brock was a Professor of World Religions, Philosophy of Religion, Spiritual Biography, Psychology of Religion, Theology and Women's Studies, and she held the Endowed Chair in the Humanities at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN, from 1990-1997. In 1997, she became the Director the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College, a research fellowship program for distinguished scientists, scholars, humanitarians, and artists. An experienced non-profit program and institution builder, she was a member of the strategic planning team for the 1999 Radcliffe-Harvard merger that led to the creation of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. From 2001-2002, she was a fellow at the Harvard Divinity School Center for Values in Public Life. She also served from 2006-2008 as senior editor in religion for The New Press in New York City. She has edited or contributed to three manuals for navigating careers in religion for the American Academy of Religion. In 2012, she received a grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc. to create the Soul Repair Center, which is dedicated to research and education on moral injury and recovery.

    Join us in room 115 of Dauch College of Business and Economics at 7pm.