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Introducing the M.Ed. in Adult Education

Talk with Graduate Admissions.

Call Us: 419.289.5738
Call Us: 1.800.882.1548 x5738
E-mail: grad-admissions@ashland.edu

Are you an International Student?

Email us at: international-admissions@ashland.edu

COE Graduate Request Info

Contact Us

Talk with Graduate Admissions.

Call Us: 419.289.5738
Call Us: 1.800.882.1548 x5738
E-mail: grad-admissions@ashland.edu

Are you an International Student?

Email us at: international-admissions@ashland.edu

Request Info

COE Graduate Request Info

The M.Ed. in Adult Education is a graduate degree for education professionals and practitioners who are not associated with the K-12 education system.  While there are 50 million youth enrolled in the nation’s K-12 system for formal teaching and learning, there are over 250 million adults who are increasingly seeking and needing formal, life-long-learning related to health and wellness, economic and workforce issues, encore career development, and a variety of cultural, second language, and adult life contexts. 

Highlights

  • A 15-hour graduate core meets the national standards for Graduate Programs in Adult Education. 
  • This core is complimented by graduate cognates in Technology, TESOL, and Organizational Administration and Change.
  • Students can also design their own career-focused cognate with faculty advisement from across the university.
  • Students with existing MBA or M.Ed. degrees can potentially earn this degree in a 21-hour second master's program.

The Bottom Line? 

The Bureau of Labor Department statistics indicate that employment opportunities in adult education will increase by more than 21% through 2025 and beyond.  This is linked, in part, to emerging trends in the U.S. that include: the need for adults to develop skills for encore careers, due to technological and economic changes in society; the increasing migration of second language residents to the U.S., and of U.S. adult populations globally due to workforce issues; and the emergence of health and wellness concerns related to the U.S. adult population that implicate rising health care costs.  Each of these trends is associated to the need for formal adult education and training programs, and a necessary rise in the number of trained educators and education leaders in adult education work settings.