University Supervisors

Supervisors work directly with the teacher candidate/intern, cooperating teacher, their local Office of Field Experiences and Internships, and others as they assist teacher candidates/interns during field experiences and internships. Ashland University selects university supervisors (clinical faculty) who are experts in their fields. They hold a record of teaching experience and a Master’s degree in education. If you are interested in becoming a supervisor please contact Bill White.

 While specific requirements are delineated throughout the handbook, the primary responsibilities of supervisors include:

  • Complete an orientation provided through the local Office of Field Experiences and Internships.
  • Act as the liaison between Ashland University and the teacher candidate’s school.
  • Provide the cooperating teacher with needed information and orientation, as appropriate.
  • At the sophomore level, the supervisor is expected to complete a minimum of three visits which include: (a) orientation meeting, (b) formal observations, and (c) final evaluation conference. A total of two formal classroom observations must be performed, and observation forms must be completed. Classroom observations should be of approximately 30 minutes each. A Field Dispositions Evaluation form must be completed by both, the supervisor and the teacher candidate. The Final Evaluation form must be completed by both the supervisor and the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates are sometimes required to complete assignments while in the field experience. 
  • At the junior/senior level, the supervisor is expected to complete a minimum of four visits which include: (a) orientation meeting, (b) formal observations, and (c) final evaluation conference. A total of three formal classroom observations must be performed, and observation forms must be completed. Classroom observations should be of approximately 30 minutes each. A Field Dispositions Evaluation form must be completed by both, the supervisor and the teacher candidate. The Final Evaluation form must be completed by both the supervisor and the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates are sometimes required to complete assignments while in the field experience. 
  • At the Bachelor Plus level, the supervisor is expected to complete a minimum of four visits which include: (a) orientation meeting, (b) formal observations, and (c) final evaluation conference. A total of two formal classroom observations must be performed, and observation forms must be completed. Classroom observations should be of approximately 30 minutes each. A Field Dispositions Evaluation form must be completed by both, the supervisor and the teacher candidate. The Final Evaluation form must be completed by both the supervisor and the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates are required to complete assignments while in the field experience. 
  • For a 14-week placement:  A minimum of eight (8) visits, which include an orientation meeting, a minimum of four (4) classroom observations of approximately 45 minutes each, Impact on Student Learning Assignment, a mid-term and final evaluation, all to be scheduled by the supervisor.
  • For a 7-week placement:  A minimum of four (4) visits, which include an orientation meeting, a minimum of two (2) classroom observations of approximately 45 minutes each, Impact on Student Learning Assignment, a mid-term and final evaluation, all to be scheduled by the supervisor. Interns who have split assignments and are only in the school placement for seven (7) weeks should have a formal final evaluation at the conclusion of each seven-week placement.  If two different supervisors are assigned to the intern in a split assignment, then both supervisors need to complete a formal final evaluation at the end of each assignment and confer on a final grade.
  • Ensure observations are on average 45 minutes.
  • Meet the principal and cooperating teacher and distribute forms, discuss the Field Placement/Internship Handbook and conduct an orientation meeting.
  • Observe and evaluate the intern’s required Impact on Student Learning Assignment .
  • Conduct a mid-term with the intern and cooperating teacher, if needed, using the Mid-Term Progress Report & Goals for 2nd Half Form.
  • Conduct a final conference with the teacher candidate and cooperating teacher.
  • Visit the classroom unannounced.
  • Require that lesson plans must be submitted in advance (recommended 48 hours) to the supervisor and cooperating teacher for approval before teaching. All teacher candidates must use the approved Ashland University standard lesson plan when teaching.
  • Review the lesson plans carefully after each observation and make reference to the quality of the lessons in the Internship Supervisor/Cooperating Teacher Observation Report Form.  The post-observation conference is an opportunity to discuss any changes that are necessary for future plans.
  • Submit the final evaluation, field disposition, and Impact on Student Learning, for interns, electronically using Live Text. Prior to submitting final grades via Web advisor.
  • Submit the final grade electronically using Web advisor by the prescribed deadline. Refer to the Credit and Grade Policy in the undergraduate or graduate catalog. It describes the credits, grades, and quality points.

Making Learning Fun

Ashland University Supervisor and Professional Fellow Judy Ream writes,

Learning at any stage of life should be FUN!  There is an element of pride that accompanies the learning process at any age.    The smile that erupts on a preschoolers face when they learn their world is filled with colors, to the spark of understanding how to apply new math concepts to real-life situations.Judy Ream

Ashland University offers a unique learning opportunity to the College of Education Candidates by allowing the students to be involved in Field Experience early on in their studies.   Working directly along side classroom teachers and interacting with the classroom students provides the concrete experience so critical to developing confident, dedicated teachers of the future.

It is has been my privilege to supervise AU Field Experience students as they begin to apply the classroom knowledge to the real world of Professional Educators in the Field Experiences. My goal as a Field Supervisor is to continue to make learning experience “FUN” for the future teachers by offering suggestions and critiques to create the very best future teachers possible!

What Drives University Supervisors

Image of Ken Packard
Ken Packard, Ashland University Supervisor, AU Professional Fellow, Ohio Association of Teacher Educators  (OATE) Outstanding College/University Supervisor (2010), and National Association of Teacher Education's (ATE) Distinguished Clinician in Teacher Education (2011) writes,

Working with and teaching children and adolescents of all ages is a gift.  Having the opportunity to help prepare those who choose to work with children and adolescents is an even greater gift.  For the past 17 years, I have had the privilege of serving as a supervisor of field experience students and student teachers at Ashland University’s Dwight Schar College of Education and have, therefore, thoroughly enjoyed that “greater” gift.  Whereas I once actively sought out AU grads to fill teaching positions in my district, I am now able to watch and help guide their development from eager students in the college classroom to novice educators in the field and, finally, polished new professionals who successfully complete their student teaching internships with the skills and dispositions to help shape the future.

Advice from the Field

Image of Mr. Ream

Ashland University Supervisor and Professional Fellow Mark Ream writes,

One of my greatest rewards as a teacher was when a student who was struggling with a concept I was teaching finally started to understand. The twinkle in the eyes, the smile on the face created what I called an “ah-ha” moment. All veteran classroom teachers can recognize these moments. As a supervisor for Ashland University, I still experience these moments, but now through the eyes of our AU students. Watching a student who was scared to death teach their first lesson to 25 seventh graders and later deliver a relaxed and confident lesson that kept their interest the entire time is a perfect “ah-ha” moment. My advice to students doing their field experience is take advantage of the opportunities that you are given. Be proactive in your placement and not reactive. Don’t be afraid  to ask your supervisor and mentor teacher questions. We have many years of experience in the classroom and are willing to share that information with you.