Improve your Teaching and your Professional Marketability

With many states and school districts now making a push to offer College Credit Plus programs—college-level courses on high school campuses—teachers like you need courses that can prepare you for the challenge of college-level instruction.  Whether your state calls it College Credit Plus, Dual Enrollment, Dual Credit, Postsecondary Education Option, or another moniker, Ashland’s graduate courses in American history and government are suitable for secondary school teachers seeking additional expertise, as well as college credit plus pathways to qualification as community college adjunct instructors.

Getting Started

In higher education, hiring institutions determine the qualifications required for potential instructors.  Typically, this is a master’s degree in the subject area to be taught OR a master’s degree in any field plus 18 hours in the subject area.  Consult the hiring institution for their exact requirements.  We strongly encourage you to contact your school district's higher education partner for guidance before you begin your studies.

If you already have a Master of Education or similar degree, it may be possible to qualify as a College Credit Plus instructor by enrolling at Ashland on a non-degree basis to take additional course work in American history or government. Again, you are encouraged to contact the hiring institution to determine exactly which Ashland courses will best prepare you to become an adjunct instructor.

Enrolling on a non-degree basis is easy. View the schedule of upcoming courses.  When you are ready to enroll, apply online for admission as a College Credit Plus/Dual-Enrollment student.

All higher ed institutions require adjunct instructors to hold a graduate degree that includes substantial study in the subject area to be taught. If you do not yet hold a master's degree, you should enroll in one of Ashland's MA degree programs in American History and Government. Both the MAHG and MASTAHG degree options are suitable for K-12 teachers who wish to become qualified to teach college-level courses on a high school campus or as an adjunct instructor at a community college. Again, you are encouraged to contact the hiring institution to determine exactly which Ashland courses will best prepare you to become an adjunct instructor.

Learn more about Ashland's Master of Arts in American History and Government and Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government degree programs. Ready to get started? Apply today.

Planning Your College Credit Plus Curriculum

Whether you will pursue your full master's degree or just need 18 semester hours of subject-area graduate coursework, it's important to select courses that will help you reach your goal. Your course of study should be guided by the college-level subject you plan to teach. Not to worry, however. Our faculty advisors are available to work with you, your administration, and your district's higher education partner to find the right courses for you.

Here are courses we suggest for College Credit Plus preparation. Again, we strongly suggest choosing courses in consultation with the community college for which you will work. Have questions about our courses or need sample syllabi? Feel free to contact us at mahg@ashland.edu or (419) 289-5411.

History Track

Teachers planning to become postsecondary American history instructors should focus their studies on courses covering the breadth of the American experience. It is suggested that your course of study cover the entirety of US history. While you are not required to take courses in chronological order or in any particular sequence, be sure you take courses covering the colonial and founding era, the 19th century, and the 20th century.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
AHG 501 The American Revolution 2
AHG 502 The American Founding 2
AHG 503 Sectionalism and Civil War 2
AHG 505 The Progressive Era 2
AHG 506 The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 2
AHG 601  Sources of the American Regime  2
AHG 602  European Discovery and Settlement  2
AHG 603  Colonial America  2
AHG 604  The Early Republic  2
AHG 605  The Age of Enterprise  2
AHG 606  America between World Wars  2
AHG 607  America during the Cold War  2
AHG 608 Civil War and Reconstruction 2
AHG 609 World War II 2
AHG 610  American Foreign Policy  2
AHG 611  The American Way of War  2
AHG 613 Postwar America, 1944-1973 2
AHG 614 Contemporary America, 1974 to present 2
AHG 620  The Reform Tradition in America  2
AHG 621  Race and Equality in America  2
AHG 622  Religion in American History and Politics  2
AHG 623  Gender and Equality in America  2
AHG 624 American Culture and Society 2
AHG 630  American Statesmen  2
Government Track

Teachers planning to become postsecondary American government instructors should focus their studies on courses addressing the nature and philosophy of government in America as well as courses exploring the structure and operation of the federal government.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
AHG 502 The American Founding 2
AHG 601  Sources of the American Regime  2
AHG 610  American Foreign Policy  2
AHG 620  The Reform Tradition in America  2
AHG 621  Race and Equality in America  2
AHG 622  Religion in American History and Politics  2
AHG 623  Gender and Equality in America  2
AHG 631  American Political Rhetoric  2
AHG 632  The American Presidency I, Washington to Lincoln  2
AHG 633  The American Presidency II, Johnson to the present  2
AHG 640  The Congress  2
AHG 641  The Supreme Court  2
AHG 642  Political Parties  2
AHG 643 Constitutional Rights and Powers 2

The Live Online Difference

Student at work in Live Online courseAshland's unique live web conference instructional model combines the rich interaction of a traditional classroom with the convenience of online study. In our history and government classes, you are part of a live conversation with the professor and your classmates. Each class session is a discussion of the people, events, and ideas of American history. Rather than dry lecture, our students directly engage in the debate of ideas. It's simple, but it's powerful. 

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