Jay D. Green
Jay D. Green
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
706.419.1654 / jay.green@covenant.edu

Jay D. Green is Professor of History at Covenant College in Lookout Mountain, Georgia, where he has been on the faculty since 1998.

Education

  • PhD, Kent State University
  • MA, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
  • BA,Taylor University
David Hadley
David Hadley
Visiting Assistant Professor of History
128, Andrews Hall
419.207.4934 / dhadley@ashland.edu
  • Joined the Ashland University faculty in 2018, serving as Visting Assistant Professor of History
  • Previously served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Gettysburg College and as an instructor at Towson University and George Mason University
  • Field of expertise is modern U.S. history, with a specific focus on the history of U.S. diplomacy and the history of intelligence and espionage in the Cold War era
  • His first book, an examination of the relationships that developed between the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the American press in the early Cold War, is due to be published by the University Press of Kentucky in 2019

Education

  • PhD, The Ohio State University
  • MA, The Ohio State University
  • BA, Gettysburg College
Lauren Hall
Lauren K. Hall
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.6827 / lxhgpt@rit.edu

Lauren Hall is Associate Professor of Political Science at Rochester Institute of Technology. Her recent book, Family and the Politics of Moderation, was published by Baylor University Press in April 2014. She has also edited a volume on the political philosophy of French political thinker, Chantal Delsol. She has written extensively on the classical liberal tradition, including articles on Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Montesquieu.  She serves on the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal Cosmos+Taxis, which publishes on spontaneous orders in the social and political worlds. She serves as the faculty advisor for the RIT College Libertarians. Her current research is on the politics of women and the family in classical liberalism, and she also writes on related areas in evolutionary theory and bioethics.

Education

  • PhD, Northern Illinois University
  • MA, Northern Illinois University
  • BA, Binghamton University
Jason Jividen
Jason Jividen
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
724.805.2825 / jason.jividen@stvincent.edu

Dr. Jividen is Associate Professor of Politics in the McKenna School of Business, Economics, and Government at Saint Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he also serves as Fellow in Civic and Constitutional Affairs for the Center for Political and Economic Thought, and Director of the Aurelius Scholars Program in Western Civilization. Since coming to SVC in 2010, Dr. Jividen has taught several courses in the Politics Department, including Principles of American Politics, American Political Thought, Constitutional Law, Classical Political Thought, and Institutions. In 2013, he was awarded SVC’s annual Quentin Schaut Faculty Award, which recognizes the contributions, leadership, and achievements of a junior faculty member to the curriculum and life of the college.

Dr. Jividen has delivered numerous invited lectures and conference papers on topics in ancient and modern political philosophy, the principles of the American Founding, Lincoln’s political thought, American Progressivism, and civic education. His recent peer-reviewed publications include: Claiming Lincoln: Progressivism, Equality, and the Battle for Lincoln’s Legacy in Presidential Rhetoric. Northern Illinois University Press, 2011; Statesmanship and Progressive Reform: An Assessment of Herbert Croly’s Abraham Lincoln (with J. David Alvis). Palgrave Macmillan, 2013; “American Democracy and Liberal Education in an Era of Relevance,” in Higher Education in an Era of Relevance, ed. Timothy L. Simpson. Lexington Books, 2013; “Presidential Statesmanship as Civic Education,” Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities (forthcoming, Fall 2014); “Equality, Leadership, and the Lincoln Image in American Presidential Rhetoric,” in Lincoln, Leadership, and the Law, ed. Charles Hubbard. Southern Illinois University Press (forthcoming 2015); “American Progressivism and the Legacy of Abraham Lincoln” (with Ronald J. Pestritto) in Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages, ed. Lucas Morel. University Press of Kentucky (forthcoming 2015).

Education

  • PhD, University of Northern Illinois
  • MA, Marshall University
  • BA, Marshall Unviersity
Jennifer Keene
Jennifer D. Keene
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
714.744.2102 / keene@chapman.edu

Jennifer D. Keene is Professor of History and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Carnegie-Mellon University and is a specialist in American military experience during World War I.  She received the Wang-Franklin Professorship for 2007-09, the highest faculty award given by Chapman University. Dr. Keene has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War, Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), The United States and the First World War (2000), and World War I ( 2006). She is also the lead author for an America history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States. She is currently working on a book detailing the African American experience during the First World War and has another project comparing the experiences of soldiers from the French and British empires during World War I. Dr. Keene served as an associate editor for the Encyclopedia of War and American Society (2005) which won the Society of Military History's prize for best military history reference book. She is on the advisory board of the International Society for First World War Studies and serves as the book review editor for the Journal of First World War Studies.

She has received numerous fellowships for her research, including a Mellon Fellowship, a Graves Award, Fulbright Senior Scholar Award to Australia and France, an Albert J. Beveridge Research Grant, and a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Award.  Dr. Keene's articles have appeared in the Organization of American Historians Magazine of HistoryAnnales de Démographie Historique, Peace & Change, Intelligence and National Security, and Military Psychology. She has published essays in several edited anthologies, including Warfare and Belligerence: New Perspectives on the First World War, National Stereotypes in Perspective: Frenchmen in America: Americans in France, and Knowing Your Friends: Intelligence Inside Alliances and Coalitions from 1914 to the Cold War. In addition, Dr. Keene has served as an on-camera expert for several film documentaries including "The March of the Bonus Army," that aired on PBS nationwide on Memorial Day 2006 and has appeared on the Chicago Public Radio Program, Odyssey. She also works closely with the Gilder-Lehrman Institute offering Teaching American History workshops for secondary school teachers throughout the country. Prior to joining the faculty of Chapman University in 2004, Dr. Keene taught at the University of Redlands.

Education

  • PhD, Carnegie-Mellon University
  • MA, The George Washington University
  • BA, The George Washington University
Sarah Beth Kitch
Sarah Beth V. Kitch
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
815.753.1011 / sbkitch@niu.edu

Sarah Beth V. Kitch is Assistant Professor of Public Affairs at the Truman School of Public Affairs and Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy at the Kinder Institute at the University of Missouri.  She received her Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 2014 and recently completed an appointment as the 2016-17 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in Religion and Public Life in the Department of Politics at Princeton University.  Her scholarly interests center on American democracy at the intersection of race and citizenship, having published articles in the American Journal of Political Science (2016) and the Journal of Church and State (2015).

Her research focuses on sources of action.  Her current work examines Martin Luther King, Jr.’s political theology and how King's participation in the prophetic tradition shapes his politics.  In addition, she is developing a study of C.S. Lewis's theory of poetic imagination and its significance for politics, based on research conducted for her dissertation, “Accountable Actors: Politics and Poetic Imagination in Huxley, Lewis, and Orwell.”

Education

  • PhD, Louisiana State University
  • MA, Louisiana State University
  • BA, Southeastern Louisiana University
Stephen Knott
Stephen F. Knott
Thomas & Mabel Guy Professor, Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
401.841.6445 / stephen.knott@usnwc.edu

Stephen F. Knott is the Thomas & Mabel Guy Professor of American History and Government at Ashland University and Professor of National Security Affairs at the United States Naval War College.

He served as co-chair of the University of Virginia's Presidential Oral History Program and directed the Ronald Reagan Oral History Project. He is the author of  Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth; Secret and Sanctioned: Covert Operations and the American Presidency; The Reagan Years; At Reagan’s Side: Insiders’ Recollections from Sacramento to the White House, and Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics. His most recent book, Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance that Forged America, was co-authored with Tony Williams, and was published in September, 2015.

Professor Knott received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Boston College, and has taught at the United States Air Force Academy and the University of Virginia.

Education

  • PhD, Boston College
  • BA, Assumption College
Dr. David Krugler
David F. Krugler
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
608.342.1783 / kruglerd@uwplatt.edu

David F. Krugler grew up in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. He left his home state to attend Creighton University, in Omaha, Nebraska. After graduating with degrees in English and history, he earned a M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He moved back to Wisconsin in 1997 to teach at the University of Wisconsin—Platteville, where he’s now Professor of History. A historian of the modern United States, he has published books on several different topics: Cold War propaganda, nuclear warfare, and racial conflict in the United States. Krugler is the author of The Voice of America and the Domestic Propaganda Battles, 1945-1953(University of Missouri Press, 2000) and This Is Only a Test: How Washington, D.C., Prepared for Nuclear War (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). In December 2014, Cambridge University Press released his third book, 1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back. Krugler has served as a faculty leader for teacher education programs at the Newberry Library in Chicago and has made dozens of presentations to academic and public audiences. He is the past recipient of research grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Organization of American Historians, and the White House Historical Association. In Spring 2011, he was a fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. In 2010, he appeared in the National Geographic Channel documentary American Doomsday. Professor Krugler is also a published novelist in the detective fiction genre, including 2016's The Dead Don't Bleed and 2018's Rip the Angels from Heaven.

Education

  • PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • MA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • BA, Creighton University
Marc Landy
Marc K. Landy
Edward & Louise Peterson Professor, Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
617.552.4172 / marc.landy@bc.edu

Marc Landy is the Edward and Louise Peterson Professor of American History and Government at Ashland University and Professor of Political Science at Boston College. With Sidney Milkis, he is the author of Presidential Greatness (2000) and a textbook, American Government: Enduring Principles, Critical Choices, now in its third edition (2014). He is an author of The Environmental Protection Agency From Nixon to Clinton: Asking the Wrong Questions (1994), with Stephen Thomas. He is an editor of Creating Competitive Markets: The Politics and Economics of Regulatory Reform (2007); Seeking the Center: Politics and Policymaking at the New Century (2001); and The New Politics of Public Policy (1995). His recent articles include: "Terror and the Executive," National Affairs, Spring 2010; EPA and Nanotechnology: The Need for a Grand Bargain?, in Christopher J. Bosso, ed., Governing Uncertainty: Environmental Regulation in the Age of Nanotechnology (Washington DC: RFF Press, 2010); (Sidney Milkis, co-author), The Presidency in the Eye of the Storm, The Presidency and the Political System, Ninth Edition (2010); "Mega-Disasters and Federalism," Public Administration Review, Vol. 68, Issue 6, October 2008; and "Great Presidents are Agents of Democratic Change," in Richard Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds., Debating the Presidency, CQ Press, 2006.

Education

  • PhD, Harvard University
  • BA, Oberlin College
Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
662.325.3604 / alang@history.msstate.edu

Andrew F. Lang is Associate Professor of History at Mississippi State University, where he specializes in the history of nineteenth-century America, using the era of the American Civil War as a lens through which to investigate the century’s dynamic setting. The Society of Civil War Historians endowed his first book, In the Wake of War: Military Occupation, Emancipation, and Civil War America (LSU Press 2017), with the 2018 Tom Watson Brown Book Award. More than 50 books published in 2017 competed for the award given annually by the principal professional organization in Civil War Era history. The prize recognizes “the best book published on the causes, conduct, and effects, broadly defined, of the Civil War,” measured by original scholarly contributions.

His most recent book, A Contest of Civilizations: Exposing the Crisis of American Exceptionalism in the Civil War Era (2021), is the final installment of UNC Press’s landmark series, the Littlefield History of the Civil War Era. The book centers the concept of American exceptionalism at the heart of the mid nineteenth century to demonstrate how contested ideas of the United States’ self-proclaimed unique and destined standing in the world contributed to the coming, conduct, and consequences of the American Civil War. The book explores how contemporary Americans questioned whether the Union could chart a distinct course in human affairs when slaveholders, abolitionists, free people of color, and enslaved African Americans all possessed irreconcilable definitions of nationhood. The era’s intellectual, political, and social ramifications defined how the United States and its citizenry sought to conceive of and give new births of freedom to its place on the world stage.

Prof. Lang is in the beginning stages of a new project that explores Abraham Lincoln’s philosophy of history.

Education

  • PhD, Rice University
  • MA, Rice University
  • MA, University of North Texas
  • BA - University of North Texas
Gordon Lloyd
Gordon Lloyd
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / glloyd@ashbrook.org

Professor Gordon Lloyd earned his bachelor of arts degree in economics and political science at McGill University. He completed all the course work toward a doctorate in economics at the University of Chicago before receiving his master of arts and PhD degrees in government at Claremont Graduate School. The coauthor of three books on the American founding and sole author of a book on the political economy of the New Deal, he also has numerous articles, reviews, and opinion-editorials to his credit. His latest coauthored books are The Two Narratives of Political Economy (2010) and The New Deal and Modern American Conservatism: A Defining Rivalry (2013). He is the creator, with the help of the Ashbrook Center, of four highly regarded websites on the origin of the Constitution. He has received many teaching, scholarly, and leadership awards including admission to Phi Beta Kappa and the Howard White Award for Teaching Excellence at Pepperdine University. He currently serves on the National Advisory Council for the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Presidential Learning Center through the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.

Education

  • PhD, The Claremont Graduate School
  • MA, The Claremont Graduate School
  • BA, McGill University
Mack Mariani
Mack Mariani
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
513.508.6849 / marianim@xavier.edu

Mack Mariani is Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Xavier University. He earned his BA at Canisius College and his MA and PhD at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

Professor Mariani's teaching and research interests include campaigns and elections, congress and the legislative process, women and politics, and political internships/experiential learning. Mariani is co-author of Diverging Parties (Westview Press, 2003) and co-editor of The Insider's Guide to Political Internships (Westview Press, 2002). His research has appeared in Political Research Quarterly, Legislative Studies QuarterlyPolitical Science QuarterlyPS: Political Science and Politics, Politics and GenderThe Journal of Women, Politics, and PolicyRepresentationComparative State Politics and The Journal of Terrorism and Political Violence.

Mariani has 15 years of political experience, having served as a legislative aide and press secretary for U.S. Representative Bill Paxon, chief of staff for the Monroe County (NY) Legislature, and on the speechwriting and media relations teams serving Monroe County Executives Jack Doyle and Maggie Brooks. Mariani started in politics working as an intern for U.S. Representative Jack Kemp.

Education

  • PhD, Syracuse University
  • MA, Syracuse University
  • BA, Canisius College
Ken Masugi
Ken Masugi
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ kenmasugi@aol.com

Ken Masugi is a lecturer of political science for the Advanced Academic Programs department at the Johns Hopkins University Washington Center for Advanced Governmental Studies. Professor Masugi has been a speechwriter for two Cabinet members and for Justice Clarence Thomas, when he was Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He is co-author, editor, or co-editor of eight books on American politics. While directing programs at the Claremont Institute, he also served as editor of its quarterly Claremont Review of Books in its early years. He is on the editorial board of two political science journals. He has taught at several universities, including the U.S. Air Force Academy, where he was Olin Distinguished Visiting Professor; James Madison College of Michigan State University; the Ashbrook Center of Ashland University; and Princeton University. He is currently writing a book on the Declaration of Independence and multiculturalismand a monograph on Tocqueville's Democracy in America.

Education

  • PhD, MA - The New School for Social Research
  • BA - Claremont McKenna College
Melissa Matthes
Melissa M. Matthes
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ Melissa.M.Matthes@uscga.edu

Melissa M. Matthes is Professor of Humanities at the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. 

Education

  • PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • MDiv, Yale University Divinity School
  • BA, Williams College
Gregory McBrayer
Gregory A. McBrayer
Assistant Professor of Political Science
125, Andrews Hall
419.289.5380 / gmcbraye@ashland.edu

Gregory A. McBrayer, assistant professor of political science and director of the core curriculum, joined Ashland University in 2017.  He teaches courses in political philosophy and international relations.  Prior to coming to Ashland, he was an assistant professor at Morehead State University, a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University, and a visiting assistant professor at Gettysburg College.  He has published articles in Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy and Kentron: Revue Pluridisciplinaire du Monde Antique, as well as reviews in InterpretationThe Journal for Hellenic StudiesThe American Journal of Islamic Social Science, and Political Science Quarterly.  He is the author (with Mary Nichols and Denise Schaeffer) of Plato’s Euthydemus (Focus, 2011) and is the editor of Xenophon: The Shorter Writings (Cornell, forthcoming).

Education

  • PhD, University of Maryland
  • MA, University of Georgia
  • BA, Emory University
Robert M.S. McDonald
Robert M.S. McDonald
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
845.938.3311 / rmsmcd@gmail.com

Robert M.S. McDonald is Professor of History at the United States Military Academy. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia, his M.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, his M.St. from Oxford, and his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He has published several journal articles and essays and is editor of Thomas Jefferson’s Military Academy: Founding West Point (University of Virginia Press, 2004), Light & Liberty: Thomas Jefferson and the Power of Knowledge (University of Virginia Press, 2012), and Sons of the Father: George Washington and His Protégés (University of Virginia Press, 2013). He is author of Confounding Father: Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time (University of Virginia Press, 2016).

Education

  • PhD, University of North Carolina
  • MA, University of North Carolina
  • MSt, Oxford University
  • BA, University of Virginia
Dan Monroe
Dan Monroe
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
217.424.6218 / dmonroe@millikin.edu

Dan Monroe is Associate Professor and John C. Griswold Distinguished Professor of History at Millikin University. Monroe specializes in American History, and has given regular talks on Lincoln throughout the Midwest. He is the author of three books: The Republican Vision of John Tyler (2003), At Home with Illinois’ Governors: A Social History of the Illinois Executive Mansion (2002), and Shapers of the Great Debate on the Civil War: A Biographical Dictionary (2005), with co-author Dr. Bruce Tap. He received the Heiligenstein Award for Teaching Excellence and was a fellow at the Virginia Historical Society and Lincoln Legal Papers.  Monroe is currently working on his fourth book - a study of everyday life in the antebellum U.S. He has been a member of Millikin’s history department since 2006.

Education

  • PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • MS, Illinois State University
  • BS, Bradley University
Lucas Morel
Lucas E. Morel
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
540.458.8161 / morell@wlu.edu

Lucas Morel is Professor of Politics and Head of the Politics Department at Washington and Lee University. He teaches American government, political philosophy, constitutional law, black American politics, and politics and literature, with research interests in Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Ralph Ellison. He also teaches in the Master’s Program in American History and Government at Ashland University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. from Claremont Graduate University and a B.A., cum laude, from Claremont McKenna College.

Dr. Morel is a past president of the Abraham Lincoln Institute, trustee of the Supreme Court Historical Society, and a member of the U.S. Semiquincentennial Commission, which will plan activities to commemorate the founding of the United States of America. He has consulted on exhibits at the Library of Congress on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. He has conducted history workshops for high school teachers throughout the country and co-written lessons on antebellum and Civil War America and the modern Civil Rights Movement for the EDSITEment website of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has also written for the Los Angeles TimesChristian Science MonitorFirst Things, and Richmond Times-Dispatch.

He is the author of Lincoln’s Sacred Effort: Defining Religion’s Role in American Self-Government (2000) and editor of Ralph Ellison and the Raft of Hope: A Political Companion to “Invisible Man” (2004). He also edited Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages (2014), and co-edited The New Territory: Ralph Ellison and the Twenty-First Century (2016). His latest book, Lincoln and the American Founding, will be published in the Concise Lincoln Library Series of Southern Illinois University Press in June 2020.

Education

  • PhD, Claremont Graduate School
  • MA, Claremont Graduate School
  • BA, Claremont McKenna College
John Moser
John E. Moser
Professor of History, Chair, Master of Arts in American History and Government
119, Andrews Hall
419.289.5231 / jmoser1@ashland.edu

John Moser is professor of history at Ashland University, where he teaches courses on modern European, American and East Asian history. He did his undergraduate work at Ohio University, and has an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has published numerous works on subjects ranging from comic books to Japanese foreign policy. He is author of four books, the most recent of which is The Global Great Depression and the Coming of World War II (Paradigm 2015). He is also the author of Right Turn: John T. Flynn and the Transformation of American Liberalism (New York University Press 2005) and Twisting the Lion’s Tail: American Anglophobia between the World Wars (New York University Press 1999).

Education

  • PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • MA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • BA, Ohio University
Dr. Peter Myers
Peter C. Myers
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
715.836.2188 / myerspc@uwec.edu

Peter C. Myers is Professor of Political Science, specializing in political philosophy and U.S. constitutional law, at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He earned his B.A. in Political Science from Northwestern University and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Loyola University Chicago. His Ph.D. dissertation, “John Locke on the Naturalness of Rights,” received the American Political Science Association’s Leo Strauss Award for the Best Doctoral Dissertation in the Field of Political Philosophy in 1992.

Professor Myers is the author of two books: Our Only Star and Compass: Locke on the Struggle for Political Rationality (1998) and Frederick Douglass: Race and the Rebirth of American Liberalism (2008). He has published articles, chapters, and book reviews in the fields of liberal political philosophy, American literature, and American political thought, including a chapter on Martin Luther King, Jr., in the History of American Political Thought anthology edited by Bryan-Paul Frost and Ashland University’s Jeffrey Sikkenga, and an article on Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln in the May 2010 issue of the American Political Science Review. He is currently researching a book on the idea of color-blindness in American political thought.

Education

  • PhD, Loyola University Chicago
  • BA, Northwestern University

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