Christian A. Pascarella
Christian A. Pascarella
Director, Master of Arts in American History and Government
808, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5608 / cpascare@ashland.edu

Chris Pascarella is the Director of the Master Arts in American History and Government program.  He holds a Bachelor of Science in Social Sciences Education from the Florida State University and a Master of Arts in American History and Government from Ashland University. Prior to joining Ashland, he taught Advanced Placement United States History at his alma mater, Spanish River Community High School, in Boca Raton, Florida. In addition to his classroom duties, Chris was involved in the planning of the district-wide American history curriculum and the training of new AP teachers for the School District of Palm Beach County. He coordinated the development and operation of Spanish River High’s partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to create a four-year American studies magnet program at the school. He has also served as a reader for the College Board’s Advanced Placement exam.

After 11 years in the classroom, Chris joined the Ashbrook Center in the fall of 2008 to assist with the administration of the rapidly growing MAHG program and with the Ashbrook Center’s Teaching American History grant partnerships. He became Director of the MAHG program in 2011.

Chris resides in Ashland, Ohio with his wife, Donna, and their three children.

Education

  • MA, Ashland University
  • BS, The Florida State University
Kathleen Pfeiffer
Kathleen Pfeiffer
Guest Lecturer
801, Ashbrook Center
248.370.2251 / pfeiffer@oakland.edu

Kathleen Pfeiffer is Professor of English at Oakland University. She is the author of Brother Mine: The Correspondence of Jean Toomer and Waldo Frank (2010) and Race Passing and American Individualism (2003). 

Education

  • PhD, Brandeis University
  • MA, Brandeis University
  • BA, Emmanuel College
Joseph Postell
Joseph Postell
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
719.255.4010 / jpostell@uccs.edu

Joseph Postell is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, where he teaches courses on American political institutions, American political thought, and administrative law. His research focuses primarily on regulation, administrative law, and the administrative state. He is the editor, with Bradley C.S. Watson, of Rediscovering Political Economy and with Johnathan O'Neill, of Toward an American Conservatism: Constitutional Conservatism During the Progressive Era.  He is currently completing a book on the administrative state and American constitutionalism, and editing a reader of primary sources on conservative thought during the early 20th century.  He also contributes frequently to the Liberty Fund's Library of Law and Liberty website on political and legal thought.

Professor Postell is an alumnus of Ashland University, where he was an Ashbrook Scholar.

Education

  • PhD, University of Dallas
  • MA, University of Dallas
  • BA, Ashland University
Nick Proctor
Nick Proctor
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
515.961.1632 / nick.proctor@simpson.edu

Nick Proctor is Professor of History at Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa. He began his explorations of the liberal arts during his undergraduate studies at Hendrix College in Arkansas. While studying abroad at Oxford University in his junior year, he became increasingly drawn to history because it seemed to be the discipline that would be most helpful in figuring out why things were the way they were. Since then he has picked up a few additional degrees and written some books, but his warmest memories are connected to the interactions that he's had with students in and out of the classroom. Most of his work involves developing new titles for the Reacting to the Past series of immersive historical role-playing games.

Education

  • PhD, Emory University
  • MA, Emory University
  • MA, University of Kentucky
  • BA, Hendrix College
Eric Pullin
Eric Pullin
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
262.551.6323 / epullin@carthage.edu

Eric Pullin is Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He earned a B.A. in history from Rockford College, an M.A. in history from Northern Illinois University, an A.M. in Labor and Industrial Relations from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Professor Pullin's primary teaching and research interests address the international relations between India and the United States during the 20th century. He also teaches courses on the History of India, the History of the United States, Western Heritage, Global Heritage, and the History of Dictionaries.

Education

  • PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • AM, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • MA, Northern Illinois University
  • BA, Rockford College
Cara Rogers
Cara Rogers
Assistant Professor of History
123, Andrews Hall
419.289.5338 / croger17@ashland.edu

Cara Rogers is Assistant Professor of History at Ashland University, where she teaches courses on the Age of Enlightenment, American history from the colonial era until the Civil War, and Thomas Jefferson. Previously, she taught at Collin College in Dallas and at Rice University. She did her undergraduate work at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and has a master’s degree in history from the University of Texas at Dallas and a Ph.D. from Rice University. Her dissertation, under revision for future publication, examines the ways in which Jefferson's book Notes on the State of Virginia influenced debates over race and slavery. Her other areas of interest include the Atlantic World, 19th century intellectual history, and world history.

Education

  • PhD, Rice University
  • MA, University of Texas at Dallas
  • BA, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
Eric Sands
Eric C. Sands
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
706.238.7896 / esands@berry.edu

Eric Sands is Associate Professor of Government at Berry College in Mount Berry, Georgia, where he received the SGA Outstanding Faculty Award in the Spring of 2009. Dr. Sands has published a book, American Public Philosophy and the Mystery of Lincolnism (University of Missouri Press, 2009) that examines the public philosophy of Abraham Lincoln and how the development of Lincoln’s ideas affected the politics of Reconstruction.  He has also published articles in Perspectives on Political SciencePS: Political Science & PoliticsThe Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Elections, and Electoral Behavior, and The Encyclopedia of the Supreme Court.  Dr. Sands has served as an Annual Fellow for the Jack Miller Center and is currently an Academic Partner for the Bill of Rights Institute. He earned his Ph.D. in Government from the University of Virginia.

Education

  • PhD, University of Virginia
  • MA, University of Virginia
  • BA, Hampden-Sydney College
Gregory Schneider
Gregory L. Schneider
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
620.341.5565 / gschneid@emporia.edu

Gregory Schneider is Professor of History at Emporia State University, where he has taught since 1998. He teaches courses in modern American history, the 1960s, diplomatic history, the history of railroads, and the history of conservatism. His research interests lie in the history of American conservatism. He has published five books: Cadres for Conservatism: Young Americans for Freedom and the Rise of the Contemporary Right (NYU Press, 1999); Conservatism in America since 1930: A Reader (NYU Press, 2003); Equality, Decadence and Modernity: The Collected Essays of Stephen J. Tonsor (ISI Books, 2005); The Conservative Century: From Reaction to Revolution (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008); and Rock Island Requiem: The Collapse of a Mighty Fine Line (University Press of Kansas, 2013).

He is married and has two children and a Catahoula Leopard dog. His hobbies include model railroading, real railroading, the Chicago White Sox, and the Chicago Bears.

Education

  • PhD, University of Illinois-Chicago
  • MA, Ohio University
  • BA, Drake University
Adam Seagrave
Adam Seagrave
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ Adam.Seagrave@asu.edu

Adam Seagrave (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame) is Associate Director and Associate Professor in the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the central ideas of the American political tradition, both in the American context itself as well as its antecedents in the history of political thought. His first book, The Foundations of Natural Morality: On the Compatibility of Natural Rights and the Natural Law, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2014. He has also published Liberty and Equality: The American Conversation (University Press of Kansas, 2015) and The Accessible Federalist (Hackett Publishing Co., 2017). In addition to his teaching and research, Dr. Seagrave serves as managing editor of the journal American Political Thought, as well as founder and co-editor of the journal Starting Points, and associate editor of the journal Compass.

Education

  • PhD, University of Notre Dame
  • BA, Thomas Aquinas College
Abbylin H. Sellers
Abbylin H. Sellers
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
626.815.6000 / asellers@apu.edu

Abbylin H. Sellers, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Political Science at Azusa Pacific University. Her areas of teaching emphasis are American politics and public policy, specifically American government, U.S. political institutions (including the constitutional presidency and war powers; Congress and the legislative process), state and local politics, welfare policy, and twentieth century Communism. Her primary research interests include welfare policy, such as the institutionalization of welfare in the 1930s, the 1996 welfare reform legislation, and the 2005 welfare reform reauthorization legislation, as well as federalism and political behavior. Sellers’ research on welfare reform examines the effects of the caseload reduction credit on federal and state level welfare work requirements, unintended consequences in policy making, and policy implementation and evaluation. Her research on political behavior focuses on descriptive representation and how it affects political participation, efficacy, and trust.

Education

  • PhD, Claremont Graduate University
  • MA, Regent University
  • BA, Westmont College
Jeffrey Sikkenga
Jeffrey Sikkenga
Professor of Political Science, Executive Director, Ashbrook Center
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / jsikkeng@ashland.edu

Jeffrey Sikkenga is Executive Director of the Ashbrook Center and Professor of Political Science at Ashland University. Jeff has been at Ashland and connected to the Ashbrook Center since 1997, serving as an adjunct fellow of the Center, a faculty member in Ashbrook’s Teaching American History program, co-director of the Ashbrook Scholar Program, and Interim Executive Director.

At Ashland University, Jeff served as President and Vice-President of the Faculty Senate and was chair of the search committee for the Provost of the University. He was also assistant chair of the Department of History and Political Science.

Jeff has been a senior fellow in the Program on Constitutionalism and Democracy at the University of Virginia, a visiting scholar at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, and the William E. Simon Distinguished Visiting Professor at the School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He has lectured across the country on religious liberty, American politics, and the Supreme Court. He is the author of a number of reviews, articles, and book chapters on political thought, the US Constitution, and politics and religion. They have appeared in journals such as  American Journal of Political Science, Political Theory, History of Political Thought, Journal of Politics, and Political Science Quarterly. He has published several books, including History of American Political Thought (2nd edition).

Education

  • PhD, University of Toronto
  • MA, University of Toronto
  • BA, University of Virginia
Sarah Morgan Smith
Sarah Morgan Smith
Director of Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
609.258.7117 / smorgan6@ashland.edu

Sarah Morgan Smith is an Ashbrook Center Fellow, General Editor of Ashbrook's Core Documents Collections, and co-director of the Center's Religion in American History and Politics project. Prior to this, she was the 2016-17 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton University. 

Her teaching and research focus on the intersection of religion and politics in American history, with an emphasis on questions of civic formation in sustaining political commitments. Drawing on her years in the field of public history and civic education, she is also deeply interested in the use of material culture and visual culture as sources for understanding the development of American political thought. Prior to beginning her doctoral work, she served as an education coordinator for the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History where she supervised the institute's Teaching American History grant partnerships.

Professor Smith has taught courses on political thought at Rutgers University and Montclair State University. She received her B.A. in History from Grove City College in 2001, her M.A. in American History and Government from Ashland University in 2009, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University in 2016.

Education

  • PhD, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • MAHG, Ashland University
  • BA, Grove City College
Jason Stevens
Jason W. Stevens
Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, MAHG Thesis and Capstone Project Coordinator
115, Andrews Hall
419.289.4933 / jsteven2@ashland.edu

Jason Stevens, Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, joined Ashland University in 2011. Previously, he served as an adjunct instructor at the University of Akron – Wayne College, North Central State College, and the University of Dallas. He teaches political thought and history courses with fields of expertise in the American Founding, Abraham Lincoln, and political philosophy. He received his B.A. from Ashland University where he was an Ashbrook Scholar and his M.A. and Ph.D. in politics from the University of Dallas Institute of Philosophic Studies.

Education

  • PhD, The University of Dallas
  • MA, The University of Dallas
  • BA, Ashland University
James Stoner
James R. Stoner
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
225.578.2538 / poston@lsu.edu

Professor James R. Stoner, Jr. is Hermann Moyse, Jr., Professor and Director of the Eric Voegelin Institute in the Department of Political Science at Louisiana State University.  He is the author of Common-Law Liberty: Rethinking American Constitutionalism (Kansas, 2003) and Common Law and Liberal Theory: Coke, Hobbes, and the Origins of American Constitutionalism (Kansas, 1992), as well as a number of articles and essays. In 2009 he was named a Senior Fellow of the Witherspoon Institute of Princeton, New Jersey; he has co-edited three books published by Witherspoon, The Thriving Society: On the Social Conditions of Human Flourishing (with Harold James, 2015), The Social Costs of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (with Donna M. Hughes, 2010), and Rethinking Business Management: Examining the Foundations of Business Education (with Samuel Gregg, 2008). He was the 2010 recipient of the Honors College Sternberg Professorship at LSU.

Dr. Stoner has taught at LSU since 1988, chaired the Department of Political Science from 2007 to 2013, and served as Acting Dean of the Honors College in the fall 2010. He was a member of the National Council on the Humanities from 2002 to 2006. In 2002-03 he was a visiting fellow in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University, where he returned in the 2013-14 academic year as Garwood Visiting Professor in the fall and Visiting Fellow in the spring.  He has teaching and research interests in political theory, English common law, and American constitutionalism

Education

  • PhD, Harvard University
  • AM, Harvard University
  • AB, Middlebury College
Sean Sutton
Sean Sutton
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.4620 / sdsgsm@rit.edu

Sean Sutton is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in Politics from the Institute of Philosophic Studies at the Univeristy of Dallas in 2001, where his research culminated in a dissertation critiquing rational choice theory, entitled "A Wealth of Notions: The Poverty of Rational Choice." He is the author (with John Murley) of The Supreme Court against the Criminal Jury: Social Science and the Palladium of Liberty (Lexington Books, 2014).

Presently, he is working on a book exploring the Enlightenment foundations of rational choice theory. He enjoys practicing martial arts and playing chess.

Education

  • PhD, University of Dallas
  • BEcon, University of Queensland, Australia
Natalie F. Taylor
Natalie Fuehrer Taylor
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
518.580.5243 / ntaylor@skidmore.edu

Natalie Taylor is Associate Professor of Government at Skidmore College.  She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Theory from Fordham University.  She has published The Rights of Woman as Chimera: the Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft (2007) and an edited volume titled A Political Companion to Henry Adams (2010). At Skidmore College, Dr. Taylor teaches courses on U.S Government Institutions, Feminist Political Thought, and American Political thought among others.

Education

  • PhD, Fordham University
  • MA, Fordham University
  • BA, Kenyon College
Stephen Tootle
Stephen K. Tootle
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
559.737.6184 / stephent@cos.edu

Stephen Tootle is Professor of History at the College of the Sequoias in Visalia, California.  Professor Tootle received his history degrees from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo (B.A., 1996), Fresno State (M.A., 1997), and Ohio University (Ph.D., 2004).  Tootle taught American political history, American intellectual history, and U.S. foreign policy at the University of Northern Colorado and Georgia State before moving back to his hometown to start a family in 2007.  His reviews, articles, and essays have appeared in the Claremont Review of Books, the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, the History News Network, and his hometown newspaper.  He is married with two young sons, Otis and Isaac.  He serves as an Elder at Visalia’s First Presbyterian Church, on the Board of the College of the Sequoias Foundation, as the Vice Chairman of the Republican Party in Tulare County, is the advisor for the College Honor Society and the College Republicans, administrates a speaker series on individual liberty, and recently concluded a term as a Leadership Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington D.C.  Tootle is a musician, and his other hobbies include shooting, riding his motorcycle, and spending as much time as possible at Huntington Lake and the Kings/Sequoia National Parks.

Education

  • PhD, Ohio University
  • MA, California State University, Fresno
  • BA, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
Dr. David Tucker
David Tucker
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
805, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5737 / dtucker@ashbrook.org

David Tucker is a Senior Fellow and Director of Teacher Programs at the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University. He is also General Editor of Ashbrook’s collection of document volumes in American history and government. He received his Ph.D. in history at the Claremont Graduate School.

His most recent book is Resistance and Revolution: Moral Revolution, Military Might, and the End of Empire (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016). He is also the author of The End of Intelligence: Espionage and State Power in the Information Age (Stanford University Press, 2014); Illuminating The Dark Arts of War:  Terrorism, Sabotage and Subversion in Homeland Security and the New Conflict (2012); Enlightened Republicanism: A Study of Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia (Lexington Books, 2008); and U.S. Special Operations Forces, with Christopher Lamb (Columbia University Press, 2007). With Sarah Morgan Smith and Ellen Deitz Tucker, he is the editor of Religion in American History and Politics: 25 Core Documents (Ashbrook Press, 2016). In addition he has published chapters and articles on Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy  Adams, and Benjamin Franklin.

Education

  • PhD, Claremont Graduate School
  • BA, Marlboro College
Jace Weaver
Jace Weaver
Honored Visiting Gradaute Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
706.542.5356 / jweaver@uga.edu

Jace Weaver is the Franklin Professor of Native American Studies and Religion, director of the Institute of Native American Studies, and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Georgia.

Dr. Weaver's work in Native American Studies is highly interdisciplinary, though focusing primarily on three areas: religious traditions, literature, and law. He is the author or editor of ten books, including That the People Might Live: Native American Literatures and Native American CommunityOther Words: American Indian Literature, Law, and Culture, and Turtle Goes to War: Of Military Commissions, the Constitution and American Indian Memory.  American Indian Literary Nationalism, written with Robert Warrior, Craig Womack, and Simon Ortiz, won the 2007 Bea Medicine Award for best book in American Indian Studies from the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and the Native American Literature Symposium. His most recent work is the essay collection Notes from a Miner's Canary.

In 2003, Dr. Weaver won the Wordcraft Award for Best Creative Non-Fiction from the Wordcraft Circle of Native American Writers for Other Words. In 1999, he won the Portfolio Award for excellence in teaching resources from the journal Media and Methods for his book on CD-ROM, American Journey: The Native American Experience. He has also been nominated for the Oklahoma and Connecticut Book Awards.

Education

  • PhD, Union Theological Seminary
  • MDiv, Union Theological Seminary
  • JD, Columbia Law School
  • AB, Columbia College of Columbia University
David Wrobel
David Wrobel
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
405.325.6002 / david.wrobel@ou.edu

David Wrobel is interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the David L. Boren Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, where he holds the Merrick Chair of Western History. He is the author of Global West, American Frontier: Travel, Empire, and Exceptionalism, from Manifest Destiny to the Great Depression (2013), winner of the Western Heritage (Wrangler) Award for Western NonfictionPromised Lands: Promotion, Memory and the Creation of the American West (2002); The End of American Exceptionalism: Frontier Anxiety from the Old West to the New Deal (1993); and numerous articles and essays. His current book projects are “The West and America, 1900-2000: A Regional History” (for Cambridge University Press); “We Hold These Truths”: American Ideas and Ideals, from the Pre-Colonial Era to the Present” (for Oxford University Press); and "John Steinbeck's America: A Cultural History, 1930-1968." He co-edits the Modern American West book series (University of Arizona Press), and is Past President of Phi Alpha Theta: The National History Honor Society, and the American Historical Association-Pacific Coast Branch.

Education

  • PhD, Ohio University
  • MA, Ohio University
  • BA, University of Kent, Canterbury, England

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