Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government

An online Master of Arts program designed for social studies teachers

The fully-online Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government (MASTAHG) offers teachers an integrated program which brings together the resources of Ohio's leading College of Education and the nation's premier liberal arts program for social studies teachers. Available as a fully-online, hybrid online/on-campus, or fully on-campus program, MASTAHG combines high-quality instruction from leading scholars with a flexible format.

Ashland's MASTAHG program is designed to prepare secondary school teachers for the challenge of teaching accelerated courses in American history and US government. The program combines the study of the people, ideas, and events that make up the American experience, with the latest theories in curriculum design and delivery.  This dual approach provides teachers with the expertise they need to effectively deliver college-level instruction at the high school level.

Courses are offered both in a traditional classroom setting at the Ashland main campus, at Ashland's regional centers, and online.  With a combination of online and on-campus study, the program may be completed in about two years.

The Key Facts About MASTAHG

  • May be completed Fully Online
  • Combines coursework in Education and in American History & Government
  • Designed for social studies teachers

Faculty Spotlight

Jeremy Bailey
Faculty

Jeremy D. Bailey, Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston, holds the Ross M. Lence Distinguished Teaching Chair and a dual appointment in Political Science and the university's Honors College. His research interests include executive power, constitutionalism, and American political thought and development.  His current book project is The Idea of Presidential Representation: An Intellectual and Political History.  His major publications include James Madison and Constitutional Imperfection (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University Press of Kansas 2013, coauthored with David Alvis and Flagg Taylor), which was named a 2014 “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice, "The New Unitary Executive and Democratic Theory," (American Political Science Review 2008) and Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007).

Bailey attended Rhodes College and received his Ph.D. from Boston College, where his dissertation was the 2004 co-winner of the APSA' s E. E. Schattschneider Prize for best dissertation in American politics. He joined the University of Houston in 2007, and, in 2014, he was awarded the University's Provost Core Teaching Excellence Award.  He is the director of the Phronesis minor in the Honors College and the co-director of the Tocqueville Forum in American Ideas and Institutions.