Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government

An online Master of Arts program designed for social studies teachers

The fully-online Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government (MASTAHG) offers teachers an integrated program which brings together the resources of Ohio's leading College of Education and the nation's premier liberal arts program for social studies teachers. Available as a fully-online, hybrid online/on-campus, or fully on-campus program, MASTAHG combines high-quality instruction from leading scholars with a flexible format.

Ashland's MASTAHG program is designed to prepare secondary school teachers for the challenge of teaching accelerated courses in American history and US government. The program combines the study of the people, ideas, and events that make up the American experience, with the latest theories in curriculum design and delivery.  This dual approach provides teachers with the expertise they need to effectively deliver college-level instruction at the high school level.

Courses are offered both in a traditional classroom setting at the Ashland main campus, at Ashland's regional centers, and online.  With a combination of online and on-campus study, the program may be completed in about two years.

The Key Facts About MASTAHG

  • May be completed Fully Online
  • Combines coursework in Education and in American History & Government
  • Designed for social studies teachers

Faculty Spotlight

Joshua Dunn
Faculty

Josuha Dunn is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Government and the Individual at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. He has research and teaching interests in public law, education policy, and political theory. His books include Complex Justice: The Case of Missouri v. Jenkins, From Schoolhouse to Courthouse: The Judiciary's Role in American Education, and Passing on the Right: Conservative Professors in the Progressive University. He also writes a quarterly article on law and education for the journal Education Next. Previously he taught at the College of William & Mary and was a fellow in contemporary history, public policy, and American politics at the Miller Center of Public Affairs in Charlottesville, Virginia.