Events

Jun
25

Join us for an address by Jennifer Keene, Professor of History at Chapman University, entitled American Patriotic Culture in World War I.

Jul
2

Join us for an address by Dr. Sarah Morgan Smith, Postgraduate Research Fellow at the James Madison Program at Princeton University, entitled Papists, Pacificsts, and Puritans: The 17th Century Religious Origins of American Independence.

Jul
9

Join us for an address by Dan Monroe, Associate Professor of History at Millikin University, entitled Understanding the Honor Culture of the Antebellum South.

Jul
16

Join us for an address by Lucas Morel, Class of 1960 Professor of Ethics and Politics and Head of the Politics Department at Washington and Lee University, entitled Frederick Douglass on Race, Liberty, and the American Creed.

MASTAHG Plan of Study

With full-time study, the MASTAHG degree may be completed in as few as 22 months. The key term to note is full-time. While possible, 22 months is an aggressive plan that is appropriate only for those whose personal and professional responsibilities allow them to be a full-time graduate student.

Have the time to dedicate all of your energies to graduate studies? Here's a sample plan of study:

22 Month Plan of Study

Semester Education Coursework AHG Coursework
Fall Semester 1 3 hours (1 course) 4 hours (2 courses)
Spring Semester 1 3 hours (1 course) 4 hours (2 courses)
Summer Semester 8 hours (4 courses)
Fall Semester 2 3 hours (1 course) 4 hours (2 courses)
Spring Semester 2 3 hours (1 course)

4 hours (2 courses)

Qualifying Exam

For the typical student who must balance their studies with family and employment, the 22 month plan may be too aggressive. Instead, take advantage of a key feature offered by Ashland's MA programs: the flexibility to spread out your studies over a longer period (up to 10 years from the start of your first course in the program). A more typical completion time is 2 to 3 years, depending upon your available time and financial resources.

This sample plan of study is simply an illustration of one possible approach to completing your studies. Students are free to work out a plan that best suits their needs and abilities.