Events

Jun
25

Join us for an address by Jennifer Keene, Professor of History at Chapman University, entitled American Patriotic Culture in World War I.

Jul
2

Join us for an address by Dr. Sarah Morgan Smith, Postgraduate Research Fellow at the James Madison Program at Princeton University, entitled Papists, Pacificsts, and Puritans: The 17th Century Religious Origins of American Independence.

Jul
9

Join us for an address by Dan Monroe, Associate Professor of History at Millikin University, entitled Understanding the Honor Culture of the Antebellum South.

Jul
16

Join us for an address by Lucas Morel, Class of 1960 Professor of Ethics and Politics and Head of the Politics Department at Washington and Lee University, entitled Frederick Douglass on Race, Liberty, and the American Creed.

Fall 2016

American History & Government Courses

Fall 2016 Session 1 (Online) - August 27 to October 21

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

AHG 501 O1B: The American Revolution (2) New! Added 7/29/16

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald (United States Military Academy)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 O1B: The Progressive Era (2) New! Added 7/29/16

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 607 O1A: America during the Cold War (2)

The simmering conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1989 was the defining phenomenon of the age, affecting not only the country's foreign policy but its politics, society, economy, and culture as well. In this course students will examine the most important events, ideas, and personalities of the 44 years from the end of World War II to the end of the Reagan administration.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Wednesday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 608 O1A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

NOTE: AHG 504 was renumbered as AHG 608 in Fall 2016. AHG 504 will no longer be a required course for students entering the MAHG or MASTAHG programs as of the Fall 2016 semester. Students who began the program prior to Fall 2016 are still required to take Civil War and Reconstruction and will receive credit for it via EITHER AHG 504 or AHG 608. Students who have already completed AHG 504 MAY NOT also take AHG 608.

This course will examine political and military aspects of the war, its causes, the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address, and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war constitutional amendments, and the politics and jurisprudence of Reconstruction.

Instructor: Lucas Morel (Washington & Lee University)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 632 O1A: The American Presidency I - Washington to Lincoln (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 642 O1A: Political Parties (2) New! Added 5/3/16

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors: Eric C. Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O1A: The Antifederalists (2)

Who were the Antifederalists? Were they simply against the proposed Constitution and "anti" Federalist, or did they have a coherent way of thinking about government? Though the Federalists won ratification of the Constitution, are the Antifederalists still relevant to the American understanding of constitutionalism? This course examines these and other questions through a careful reading of Antifederalist literature and speeches at state ratifying conventions in 1787-1788. 

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Fall 2016 Session 2 (Online) - October 22 to December 17

AHG 502 O2A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: S. Adam Seagrave (University of Missouri)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET (NOTE: This class will meet from 8:15 pm to 11:00 pm ET on Thursday, November 17th. It will NOT meet on Thursday, November 24th.)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 502 O2B: The American Founding (2) New! Added 7/29/16

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 O2A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Jason Jividen (Saint Vincent University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 506 O2A: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

NOTE: This section was previously listed as AHG 660 O2B.

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945. 

Instructor: John Moser (Ashland University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET (NOTE: This course will not finish in time for students planning to graduate in December 2016)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O2A: Great American Texts - Booker T. Washington & W.E.B. DuBois (2)

Booker Washington had a definite strategy for pulling African Americans up from slavery, a plan that embraced the American ideals of equality and liberty that Washington believed could be realized through land ownership and entrepreneurship. W.E.B. DuBois countered that Washington's strategy was misguided in its failure to demand protection of universal rights for blacks. The debate between the two has been presented mostly as a tension between protest and accommodation, or between segregation and integration. The conflict between the two men operated on both ideological and personal levels, but history has dwelt on the former and neglected the latter. This course will unpack the conflict between Washington and DuBois and examine the content of civil rights strategies in the twentieth century.

Instructor: Robert J. Norrell (University of Tennessee)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts - Uncle Tom's Cabin (2)

This course illuminates one area of American political thought. The topic will be Harriet Stowe’s moral account of freedom and the reasoning associated with it. The focus will be on Uncle Tom’s Cabin, albeit referencing several of Stowe’s writings. We will establish a context for the discussion by reviewing Frederick Douglass’s powerful question, “What country have I?”, and the political, religious, and cultural contexts in which Uncle Tom’s Cabin was written. The goal is to understand just how Stowe came to formulate her ideas and why she had the impact on American society that she did. Also to be considered is whether the philosophical ideas that informed her work bear any direct responsibility for the political events that unfolded as a result of her work.

Instructor: William B. Allen (Michigan State University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no course packet for this course.

AHG 602 O2A: European Discovery and Settlement (2)

An examination of the motives behind and the consequences of the expansion of European power beginning in the 16th Century. The course focuses on the European settlement of North America and the interactions between Europeans and indigenous peoples.

Instructor: David C. Tucker (Ashbrook Center at Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 641 O2A: The Supreme Court (2)

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court's power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructor: Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

ScheduleSaturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET (NOTE: This course will not finish in time for students planning to graduate in December 2016)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2C: Postwar America: 1945-1973 (2) New! Added 8/22/16

This course is an examination of the United States in the first half of the postwar era. It is structured around, though not limited to, the following themes: the United States’ emergence from World War II as a world power and the nation’s ambitious foreign policy; the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements; the expansion of federal power and programs; the partisanship of American politics and the growing power of the executive branch; popular culture and the media; and the strengths and weaknesses of an increasingly globalized economy. Upon completion of the course, students will have a detailed understanding of how the United States and its people and government responded to domestic and global challenges, crises, and changes occurring during this three-decade period.

Instructors: David Krugler (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Qualifying Examination

AHG 693 - Qualifying Examination - Fall 2016

AHG 693 A: Qualifying Examination (0)

The Fall 2016 Qualifying Examination for MAHG and MASTAHG degree candidates requires students to write three essays: one mandatory textual analysis question and two additional essays chosen by the candidate from among a set of four questions.

Schedule:

Exam questions released: Friday, October 14th at noon Eastern
Student responses due: Monday, October 31th at noon Eastern
Students informed of results: Week of November 21st

Students must have completed (or will complete during the Fall 2016 semester) all 32 semester credit hours (MAHG) or all 24 semester credit hours of required AHG-prefixed course work (MASTAHG) to be eligible to register to take the exam.

MASTAHG Education Courses

Fall 2016

Education courses are available in fully-online, hybrid online/on-campus, and traditional in-person formats at the Ashland University main campus (Ashland, Ohio), Columbus Center (Columbus, Ohio), Eylria Center (Elyria, Ohio), Cleveland Center (Independence, Ohio), and Stark Center (Massillon, Ohio). A complete schedule of online, in-person, and hybrid courses will be available on WebAdvisor by June 1st. MASTAHG students may regsiter for education courses via WebAdvisor beginning July 1st.