Multidisciplinary Studies

Contact Us

Coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies Program

Cindy Moseman
Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
419.289.5293
cmoseman@ashland.edu
210C Center for the Arts

Programs

There are multiple choices you will make in developing a Multidisciplinary Studies major.  One decision is whether the degree will be a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. This decision is best made in consultation with your faculty mentors and the dean(s). 

However, in general, a Bachelor of Arts is normally awarded in such majors as the foreign languages, English, history, philosophy and other majors in the humanities.

A Bachelor of Science degree typically involves technical fields (athletic training, nursing, social work), or in such majors as the physical and biological sciences

Both B.A. and B.S. degrees require the same number of hours for a Multidisciplinary Studies major.

A Multidisciplinary Studies major requires significant student initiative. However, you will work with two full-time faculty mentors and their respective dean(s), chosen from each of the cognate areas, to design a Multidisciplinary Studies Major which falls within the competence of university faculty.

Conceptualizing the major is your responsibility and, in some cases, may be facilitated by using a faculty-designed template.  A proposal showing a progression of study is prepared by you in consultation with the coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies program and two faculty mentors based in departments that are related to the proposed major.

Application Process

  • Admission to the MDS major is not automatic or instantaneous. For instructions on applying for this major, see the Proposal Form.
  • Interested students should contact the Coordinator of MDS, Dr. Cindy Moseman (210B CFA, x5293), or if a declared fully online student contact a GOA Advisor (GOA-Advising@Ashland.Edu). They will review program requirements, application process, discuss the student’s areas of interest and assist the student in identifying university faculty members who may be of assistance in advising the student.
  • A student will work with two full-time faculty mentors and their respective dean(s), chosen from each of the cognate areas, to design a Multidisciplinary Studies major which falls within the competence of university faculty. Conceptualizing the major is the responsibility of the student and, in some cases, may be facilitated by using a faculty-designed template.  A proposal showing a progression of study is prepared by the student in consultation with the coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies program and two faculty mentors based in departments that are related to the proposed major.

The proposal form requires:

  1. a brief written statement (approximately 300 words)  explaining the reasons for the specific combination of cognate areas proposed and what educational or professional benefits are expected from completion of this  MDS major.
  2. a list of all courses taken to date for each cognate area, as well as proposed courses yet to be taken for each cognate area.
  • The Proposal Form requires more than the bringing together of courses related to a particular topic. The proposal should define a systematic body of knowledge and demonstrate a logical progression in the curriculum. Thus, movement through the major should move from an introductory to an advanced level.
  • Once the program is approved by the two faculty mentors, their respective deans and the coordinator of MDS, the completed proposal must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office for verification and inclusion in the student’s permanent file no later than the first semester of the student’s junior year.
  • A separate permission form is required for enrollment in MDS 490: Multidisciplinary Capstone Experience. This form will be submitted along with a proposal for the project to be conducted during the capstone.

Assessment

Multidisciplinary Studies assessment

Assessment - All Multidisciplinary Studies majors will be assessed during MDS 490 Multidisciplinary Capstone Experience for proficiency in the MDS student learning outcomes listed below.

Student will:

  • Demonstrate a significant depth of knowledge in two different cognate areas
  • Identify the issues, problems or goals addressed by each cognate area
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the terminology commonly used in each cognate area
  • Identify and explain key texts or significant works in each cognate area
  • Explain the mode of inquiry or creative process that characterizes each cognate area
  • Describe how the two cognate areas contrast with each other, or complement one another, in ways that create a greater understanding than either would provide alone
  • Explain how the concepts, skills and values of the chosen cognate areas will help the student to reach identified educational/career goals and/or contribute to the student's personal, social or spiritual life.

Contact Us

Coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies Program

Cindy Moseman
Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
419.289.5293
cmoseman@ashland.edu
210C Center for the Arts

Programs

There are multiple choices you will make in developing a Multidisciplinary Studies major.  One decision is whether the degree will be a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. This decision is best made in consultation with your faculty mentors and the dean(s). 

However, in general, a Bachelor of Arts is normally awarded in such majors as the foreign languages, English, history, philosophy and other majors in the humanities.

A Bachelor of Science degree typically involves technical fields (athletic training, nursing, social work), or in such majors as the physical and biological sciences

Both B.A. and B.S. degrees require the same number of hours for a Multidisciplinary Studies major.

A Multidisciplinary Studies major requires significant student initiative. However, you will work with two full-time faculty mentors and their respective dean(s), chosen from each of the cognate areas, to design a Multidisciplinary Studies Major which falls within the competence of university faculty.

Conceptualizing the major is your responsibility and, in some cases, may be facilitated by using a faculty-designed template.  A proposal showing a progression of study is prepared by you in consultation with the coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies program and two faculty mentors based in departments that are related to the proposed major.

Application Process

  • Admission to the MDS major is not automatic or instantaneous. For instructions on applying for this major, see the Proposal Form.
  • Interested students should contact the Coordinator of MDS, Dr. Cindy Moseman (210B CFA, x5293), or if a declared fully online student contact a GOA Advisor (GOA-Advising@Ashland.Edu). They will review program requirements, application process, discuss the student’s areas of interest and assist the student in identifying university faculty members who may be of assistance in advising the student.
  • A student will work with two full-time faculty mentors and their respective dean(s), chosen from each of the cognate areas, to design a Multidisciplinary Studies major which falls within the competence of university faculty. Conceptualizing the major is the responsibility of the student and, in some cases, may be facilitated by using a faculty-designed template.  A proposal showing a progression of study is prepared by the student in consultation with the coordinator of the Multidisciplinary Studies program and two faculty mentors based in departments that are related to the proposed major.

The proposal form requires:

  1. a brief written statement (approximately 300 words)  explaining the reasons for the specific combination of cognate areas proposed and what educational or professional benefits are expected from completion of this  MDS major.
  2. a list of all courses taken to date for each cognate area, as well as proposed courses yet to be taken for each cognate area.
  • The Proposal Form requires more than the bringing together of courses related to a particular topic. The proposal should define a systematic body of knowledge and demonstrate a logical progression in the curriculum. Thus, movement through the major should move from an introductory to an advanced level.
  • Once the program is approved by the two faculty mentors, their respective deans and the coordinator of MDS, the completed proposal must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office for verification and inclusion in the student’s permanent file no later than the first semester of the student’s junior year.
  • A separate permission form is required for enrollment in MDS 490: Multidisciplinary Capstone Experience. This form will be submitted along with a proposal for the project to be conducted during the capstone.

Assessment

Multidisciplinary Studies assessment

Assessment - All Multidisciplinary Studies majors will be assessed during MDS 490 Multidisciplinary Capstone Experience for proficiency in the MDS student learning outcomes listed below.

Student will:

  • Demonstrate a significant depth of knowledge in two different cognate areas
  • Identify the issues, problems or goals addressed by each cognate area
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the terminology commonly used in each cognate area
  • Identify and explain key texts or significant works in each cognate area
  • Explain the mode of inquiry or creative process that characterizes each cognate area
  • Describe how the two cognate areas contrast with each other, or complement one another, in ways that create a greater understanding than either would provide alone
  • Explain how the concepts, skills and values of the chosen cognate areas will help the student to reach identified educational/career goals and/or contribute to the student's personal, social or spiritual life.

Forms

What to Expect

The Multidisciplinary Studies program enables you to pursue a cohesive set of courses from two different disciplinary areas in substitution for the traditional major. In addition to gaining a solid foundation in the content of two different disciplines, you’ll also learn how to integrate the knowledge you gain from each of your chosen disciplines to your future career.

How it Works

In consultation with two faculty advisors, you’ll develop a written proposal for the courses that will be included in your required curriculum. You’ll need to receive approval from the individuals listed on your Proposal Form.

Your proposal will need to total at least 120 hours and include:

  • Major Classes (60 hours), including courses from two cognate areas consisting of at least 24 semester hours each. Of those 24 hours, at least 9 credit hours must be 300/400 level courses.
  • The Multidisciplinary Capstone course (3 hours)
  • University Core (44-60 hours)

Student Learning Outcomes

By completing the Multidisciplinary Studies program, you'll:

  • Demonstrate a significant depth of knowledge in two different cognate areas  
  • Identify the issues, problems or goals addressed by each cognate area
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the terminology commonly used in each cognate area
  • Identify and explain key texts or significant works in each cognate area
  • Explain the mode of inquiry or creative process that characterizes each cognate area
  • Describe how the two cognate areas contrast with each other, or complement one another, in ways that create a greater understanding than either would provide alone
  • Explain how the concepts, skills and values of the chosen cognate areas will help the student to reach identified educational/career goals and/or contribute to the student's personal, social or spiritual life.

Designing Your Own Path

Do have a clear career goal that requires skills from multiple fields? The B.A. or B.S. degree in Multidisciplinary Studies (MDS) is an individualized degree that allows you to customize a degree program to meet your personal, educational, and career goals.

Veteran Services

Veteran Services