Department of Philosophy

Contact Us

Dr. Louis Mancha

Chair, Department of Philosophy
202 Center for Humanities Bixler
lmancha@ashland.edu
419-289-5894

Angela Miller

Administrative Assistant
203, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
amille75@ashland.edu
419-289-5110

Department e-mail

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Programs

Philosophy Major

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy

Course Number and Title Hrs. Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104 or 117) 3 None
1 ethics course (PHIL 110, 215 or 280) 3 None
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
2 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 6 PHIL 104, 110, 117 or 215 recommended
3 PHIL electives (300 level or above) 9
24 hrs.

Note: At least 15 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Philosophy Minor

Why consider minoring in Philosophy?

The Philosophy minor is designed to complement most major programs at Ashland. Training in philosophy will help you enhance your critical thinking, analytical writing, and historical reasoning, regardless of your major or plan of study. You’ll find these skills valuable in all areas of your personal and professional life.

To graduate with a Philosophy minor, you’ll take the following courses:

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104 or 117) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 110, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
1 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 3 PHIL 104, 110, 117 or 215 recommended
1 PHIL elective (300 level or above) 3
15 hrs.

Note: At least 6 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Ethics Minor

Embracing an Ethical Mindset

Are you interested in studying the difference between right and wrong, good and bad, with a special emphasis on discovering the reasons why people make such judgments?

Ashland University's unique ethics minor is shared between the Philosophy and Religion departments to train you to be more ethically diverse and aware of your global responsibilities.

If planned correctly, almost every major can benefit from the opportunity to add this minor with as little as one additional course beyond your core requirements.

How it Works

To obtain this minor, you must satisfy two courses from each department (6 hours each), and then you can choose an approved elective (3 hours), designated by the Ethics Minor Committee.  

Note that Religion and Philosophy majors may count only one of the ethics courses from that major toward the ethics minor requirement in that department.

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
Philosophy ethics courses – 6 hours
PHIL 110: Phil. of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL 215: Intro to Ethics 3 None
PHIL 280: Applied Ethics 3 None
9 hrs.
Religion ethics courses – 6 hours
REL 109: Exploring Christian Ethics 3 None
REL 220: Taking Human Life 3 None
REL 308: Faith and Society 3 None
REL 401: Sem. in Christian Ethics 3 REL 106 or 109
Any Approved Elective – 3 hours 3 (variable)
15 hrs.
Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies Major provides students with an opportunity to complete a degree with a primary foundation in practical thinking and ethics.  In addition, the student will develop this foundation through the choice of two concentrations in either the humanities, the sciences, or a business-oriented practicum.  It will conclude with a capstone thesis, that will require the student to unify the foundation with the concentrations into a cohesive understanding.

This program has two unique advantages.  (1) It prepares students for a broad range of careers across fields such as marketing, supply chain management, social work, hospitality services, and finance.  Entrepreneurial graduates might start their own business or work for businesses in related areas.  (2) Yet it also empowers our students to become careful, critical thinkers, and to learn how to apply principles of integrity and ethical decision-making to address real-world issues.  Both of these are central to the mission of AU.

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Ethics/Practical Thinking Foundations Sequence
PHIL/IDS 110 – Philosophy of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL/IDS 215 – Ethics 3 None
PHIL/IDS 220 – Practical Thinking 3 None
MATH 110 – Finite Mathematics 3 Two years of high school algebra or MATH 100
PSYC 101 – General Psychology I 3
REL 109 – Exploring Christian Ethics 3
REL 220 – Taking Human Life 3
 
Choose three from the following: 9
PHIL/IDS 280B – Environmental Ethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 280D – Bioethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 280H – Workplace Ethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 320 - Symbolic Logic (3) PHIL 220 recommended
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
MATH 108 – Introductory Statistics (3) Math ACT score of 18 or above or Math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH 100
MATH 223 – Discrete Mathematics I (3) Three years of high school college prep math
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
REL 400* – Seminar in Christian Literature (3) REL 106
SEC 185* – Cyber Ethics (3)
30 hours
Concentration 1 15
Concentration 2 15
IDS 490 Capstone Thesis 1 Senior status in major
61 hours

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations & Four-Year Guides

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

COURSE ROTATIONS & FOUR YEAR GUIDES

Master Syllabi

Feel free to browse our Master Syllabi for courses included in the university core program.

All Master Syllabi for Philosophy

For more information about advanced courses and topics, please contact the department:

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Current Academic Year
Philosophy
Philosophy Four-Year Guide
Philosophy Three-Year Guide
Philosophy Curricular Map

Alumni

If you are an alumnus or alumna, please be sure to take our EXIT survey. We would love to have updated information about you, as well as get your opinion about the value of our program in your life.

The link to our EXIT survey

Organizations

American Philosophical Association

American Philosophical Association

The American Philosophical Association was founded in 1900 to promote the exchange of ideas among philosophers, to encourage creative and scholarly activity in philosophy, to facilitate the professional work and teaching of philosophers and to represent philosophy as a discipline.

Having grown from a few hundred members to over 10,000, the American Philosophical Association is one of the largest philosophical societies in the world and the only American philosophical society not devoted to a particular school or philosophical approach.

Society of Christian Philosophers

Society of Christian Philosophers

The Society of Christian Philosophers was organized in 1978 to promote fellowship among Christian Philosophers and to stimulate study and discussion of issues which arise from their Christian and philosophical commitments. One of its chief aims is to go beyond the usual philosophy of religion sessions at the American Philosophical Association and to stimulate thinking about the nature and role of Christian commitment in philosophy.

Ohio Philosophical Association

Ohio Philosophical Association

The Ohio Philosophical Association has existed as a section of the Ohio College Association since 1931. The College Association was founded in 1867.

The Ohio Philosophical Association has as its purpose the encouragement of "research in philosophy in the colleges and universities in Ohio." The membership comprises all those who teach philosophy in institutions which are members of the Ohio College Association and those who are members of this Association at the age of retirement.

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau is the International Honor Society in Philosophy. Founded in 1930 and incorporated as a nonprofit corporation in 1955, the Society now has a network of over 200 chapters throughout the United States and Canada, at both public and private institutions of higher learning. The purpose of Phi Sigma Tau is to encourage interest and activity among students and to promote ties between philosophy departments in accredited institutions.

Ashland University's PHI SIGMA TAU, Ohio Mu Chapter, honors students who have demonstrated academic excellence in philosophy.  Membership is by invitation, selected from students who meet the following minimum conditions: have completed 9 semester hours of philosophy, with a GPA of at least 3.5 in two of those classes, and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

2021-22 Members

  • Eric Breeden
  • Kaitlyn Clark
  • Michael Clark
  • Drew Creger
  • Alec Dunlap
  • Mikayla Gypton
  • Lydia Heckert
  • James Metzger
  • Carrick Miller
  • Nicholas Novotny
  • Shane Royce
  • Kasey Siciliano
  • Nathan Sims
  • Joseph Smith
  • Lexi Weyer
AU Philosophy Club

AU Philosophy Club

Members of the Ashland Philosophy Club are interested in philosophy, getting together, eating pizza, watching the occasional movie, and getting into existential trouble. If you don't believe us, just ask...

Meetings are commonly held twice a month during the semester. We also conduct our traditional Socrates Café discussions (called Soccafés, for short), like to host movie nights and participate in the occasional Phil Core Brannigan (the existential trouble we just mentioned above).

To find out about our schedule please watch for fliers on campus, click on the link above, or you can email one of the officers to get on the email list.

Everyone and anyone is welcome, no philosophy background necessary.

Be sure to check out our WALL, DOCS and LINKS on the FB page. It's all good stuff!

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Mancha
Dr. Louis Mancha
Chair, Department of Philosophy, Associate Professor of Philosophy
202, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5894 / lmancha@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
William Vaughan core director philosophy academic excellence logic
Dr. William Vaughan
Professor of Philosophy
208, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5654 / wvaughan@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy

Contact Us

Contact Us

Dr. Louis Mancha

Chair, Department of Philosophy
202 Center for Humanities Bixler
lmancha@ashland.edu
419-289-5894

Angela Miller

Administrative Assistant
203, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
amille75@ashland.edu
419-289-5110

Department e-mail

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Programs

Programs

Philosophy Major

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy

Course Number and Title Hrs. Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104 or 117) 3 None
1 ethics course (PHIL 110, 215 or 280) 3 None
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
2 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 6 PHIL 104, 110, 117 or 215 recommended
3 PHIL electives (300 level or above) 9
24 hrs.

Note: At least 15 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Philosophy Minor

Why consider minoring in Philosophy?

The Philosophy minor is designed to complement most major programs at Ashland. Training in philosophy will help you enhance your critical thinking, analytical writing, and historical reasoning, regardless of your major or plan of study. You’ll find these skills valuable in all areas of your personal and professional life.

To graduate with a Philosophy minor, you’ll take the following courses:

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104 or 117) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 110, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
1 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 3 PHIL 104, 110, 117 or 215 recommended
1 PHIL elective (300 level or above) 3
15 hrs.

Note: At least 6 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Ethics Minor

Embracing an Ethical Mindset

Are you interested in studying the difference between right and wrong, good and bad, with a special emphasis on discovering the reasons why people make such judgments?

Ashland University's unique ethics minor is shared between the Philosophy and Religion departments to train you to be more ethically diverse and aware of your global responsibilities.

If planned correctly, almost every major can benefit from the opportunity to add this minor with as little as one additional course beyond your core requirements.

How it Works

To obtain this minor, you must satisfy two courses from each department (6 hours each), and then you can choose an approved elective (3 hours), designated by the Ethics Minor Committee.  

Note that Religion and Philosophy majors may count only one of the ethics courses from that major toward the ethics minor requirement in that department.

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
Philosophy ethics courses – 6 hours
PHIL 110: Phil. of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL 215: Intro to Ethics 3 None
PHIL 280: Applied Ethics 3 None
9 hrs.
Religion ethics courses – 6 hours
REL 109: Exploring Christian Ethics 3 None
REL 220: Taking Human Life 3 None
REL 308: Faith and Society 3 None
REL 401: Sem. in Christian Ethics 3 REL 106 or 109
Any Approved Elective – 3 hours 3 (variable)
15 hrs.
Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies Major provides students with an opportunity to complete a degree with a primary foundation in practical thinking and ethics.  In addition, the student will develop this foundation through the choice of two concentrations in either the humanities, the sciences, or a business-oriented practicum.  It will conclude with a capstone thesis, that will require the student to unify the foundation with the concentrations into a cohesive understanding.

This program has two unique advantages.  (1) It prepares students for a broad range of careers across fields such as marketing, supply chain management, social work, hospitality services, and finance.  Entrepreneurial graduates might start their own business or work for businesses in related areas.  (2) Yet it also empowers our students to become careful, critical thinkers, and to learn how to apply principles of integrity and ethical decision-making to address real-world issues.  Both of these are central to the mission of AU.

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Ethics/Practical Thinking Foundations Sequence
PHIL/IDS 110 – Philosophy of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL/IDS 215 – Ethics 3 None
PHIL/IDS 220 – Practical Thinking 3 None
MATH 110 – Finite Mathematics 3 Two years of high school algebra or MATH 100
PSYC 101 – General Psychology I 3
REL 109 – Exploring Christian Ethics 3
REL 220 – Taking Human Life 3
 
Choose three from the following: 9
PHIL/IDS 280B – Environmental Ethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 280D – Bioethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 280H – Workplace Ethics (3)
PHIL/IDS 320 - Symbolic Logic (3) PHIL 220 recommended
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
MATH 108 – Introductory Statistics (3) Math ACT score of 18 or above or Math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH 100
MATH 223 – Discrete Mathematics I (3) Three years of high school college prep math
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
REL 400* – Seminar in Christian Literature (3) REL 106
SEC 185* – Cyber Ethics (3)
30 hours
Concentration 1 15
Concentration 2 15
IDS 490 Capstone Thesis 1 Senior status in major
61 hours

Curriculum

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations & Four-Year Guides

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

COURSE ROTATIONS & FOUR YEAR GUIDES

Master Syllabi

Feel free to browse our Master Syllabi for courses included in the university core program.

All Master Syllabi for Philosophy

For more information about advanced courses and topics, please contact the department:

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Current Academic Year
Philosophy
Philosophy Four-Year Guide
Philosophy Three-Year Guide
Philosophy Curricular Map

Alumni

Alumni

If you are an alumnus or alumna, please be sure to take our EXIT survey. We would love to have updated information about you, as well as get your opinion about the value of our program in your life.

The link to our EXIT survey

Organizations

Organizations

American Philosophical Association

American Philosophical Association

The American Philosophical Association was founded in 1900 to promote the exchange of ideas among philosophers, to encourage creative and scholarly activity in philosophy, to facilitate the professional work and teaching of philosophers and to represent philosophy as a discipline.

Having grown from a few hundred members to over 10,000, the American Philosophical Association is one of the largest philosophical societies in the world and the only American philosophical society not devoted to a particular school or philosophical approach.

Society of Christian Philosophers

Society of Christian Philosophers

The Society of Christian Philosophers was organized in 1978 to promote fellowship among Christian Philosophers and to stimulate study and discussion of issues which arise from their Christian and philosophical commitments. One of its chief aims is to go beyond the usual philosophy of religion sessions at the American Philosophical Association and to stimulate thinking about the nature and role of Christian commitment in philosophy.

Ohio Philosophical Association

Ohio Philosophical Association

The Ohio Philosophical Association has existed as a section of the Ohio College Association since 1931. The College Association was founded in 1867.

The Ohio Philosophical Association has as its purpose the encouragement of "research in philosophy in the colleges and universities in Ohio." The membership comprises all those who teach philosophy in institutions which are members of the Ohio College Association and those who are members of this Association at the age of retirement.

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau is the International Honor Society in Philosophy. Founded in 1930 and incorporated as a nonprofit corporation in 1955, the Society now has a network of over 200 chapters throughout the United States and Canada, at both public and private institutions of higher learning. The purpose of Phi Sigma Tau is to encourage interest and activity among students and to promote ties between philosophy departments in accredited institutions.

Ashland University's PHI SIGMA TAU, Ohio Mu Chapter, honors students who have demonstrated academic excellence in philosophy.  Membership is by invitation, selected from students who meet the following minimum conditions: have completed 9 semester hours of philosophy, with a GPA of at least 3.5 in two of those classes, and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

2021-22 Members

  • Eric Breeden
  • Kaitlyn Clark
  • Michael Clark
  • Drew Creger
  • Alec Dunlap
  • Mikayla Gypton
  • Lydia Heckert
  • James Metzger
  • Carrick Miller
  • Nicholas Novotny
  • Shane Royce
  • Kasey Siciliano
  • Nathan Sims
  • Joseph Smith
  • Lexi Weyer
AU Philosophy Club

AU Philosophy Club

Members of the Ashland Philosophy Club are interested in philosophy, getting together, eating pizza, watching the occasional movie, and getting into existential trouble. If you don't believe us, just ask...

Meetings are commonly held twice a month during the semester. We also conduct our traditional Socrates Café discussions (called Soccafés, for short), like to host movie nights and participate in the occasional Phil Core Brannigan (the existential trouble we just mentioned above).

To find out about our schedule please watch for fliers on campus, click on the link above, or you can email one of the officers to get on the email list.

Everyone and anyone is welcome, no philosophy background necessary.

Be sure to check out our WALL, DOCS and LINKS on the FB page. It's all good stuff!

Faculty & Staff

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Mancha
Dr. Louis Mancha
Chair, Department of Philosophy, Associate Professor of Philosophy
202, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5894 / lmancha@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
William Vaughan core director philosophy academic excellence logic
Dr. William Vaughan
Professor of Philosophy
208, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5654 / wvaughan@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy

Cultivating a Love of Wisdom

It’s one thing to make a living, and another thing to learn how to live well. Studying Philosophy at Ashland University can help you do both.

Philosophy Department Differentiators

Ashland University’s Philosophy Department is one of the few programs of its size to offer comprehensive study both in analytical philosophy—with an emphasis on logic, reasoning, and analysis—and continental philosophy—with its emphasis on aesthetics and literary approaches to thought.

Other department differentiators include:

  • Philosophy is the original program that teaches you how to think, not what to think!  Focusing on logic, ethics, and the history of ideas, the study of Philosophy is central to any university experience.
  • The study of Philosophy will help you develop the intellectual tools necessary to expand your understanding of both the ordinary and profound questions of life.  You will gain communication skills, analytical, and problem solving abilities that will help you succeed in a wide range of occupations or in graduate school.
  • A unique, thorough sequence in the history of philosophy focused on primary texts to empower you with the most significant ideas of the past and present
  • With a 24 hour major and a 15 hour minor, the Philosophy program is designed to complement most academic profiles.  Many students easily add it as a second or third major or minor.
  • Our unique Ethics minor trains students to be more ethically responsible and aware of their global responsibilities.  At only 15 hours, almost EVERY MAJOR can add the Ethics minor with as little as ONE additional course beyond their core requirements.  It's a value-added, low to no cost minor!
  • The study of Philosophy is integrated into a variety of other disciplines on campus, such as Art, Nursing, Religion, the Ashbrook program, Interdisciplinary Studies, Education, Environmental Science, and even Criminal Justice.
  • Our majors have been accepted into top law, medical, and graduate schools around the nation.

Our Mission

It is the intrinsic mission of the Philosophy Department to cultivate students in the love of wisdom. The Philosophy Department provides students with the tools to be educated and productive members of the world, regardless of their profession or vocation. While other departments focus on specific topics and work-related skills, it is the duty of the Philosophy Department to teach students the love of learning itself, to seek purpose in their lives, and to make informed, objective, and consistent judgments. When students are instructed in the love of wisdom, they learn not only how to make a living, but how to live well.

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