Department of Philosophy

Contact Us

Dr. Louis Mancha

Chair, Department of Philosophy
202 Center for Humanities Bixler
lmancha@ashland.edu
419.289.5894

Administrative Assistant

Lindsay Brandon-Smith
203 Center for Humanities, Bixler (CFHB)
419.289.5110
lbrando2@ashland.edu

Department e-mail

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Programs

Philosophy Major

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy

Course Number and Title Hrs. Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104, 205, 208 or 217) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 210, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320)   3 none
2 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314)  6 PHIL 104, 205, 
208, 210, 215 or 217
3 PHIL electives (300 level or above) 9
24 hrs.

Note: At least 15 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Philosophy Minor

Why consider minoring in Philosophy?

The Philosophy minor is designed to complement most major programs at Ashland. Training in philosophy will help you enhance your critical thinking, analytical writing, and historical reasoning, regardless of your major or plan of study. You’ll find these skills valuable in all areas of your personal and professional life.

To graduate with a Philosophy minor, you’ll take the following courses:

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104, 205, 208 or 217) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 210, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
1 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 3 PHIL 104, 205, 
208, 210, 215 or 217
1 PHIL elective (300 level or above) 3
15 hrs.

Note: At least 6 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Ethics Minor

Embracing an Ethical Mindset

Are you interested in studying the difference between right and wrong, good and bad, with a special emphasis on discovering the reasons why people make such judgments?

Ashland University's unique ethics minor is shared between the Philosophy and Religion departments to train you to be more ethically diverse and aware of your global responsibilities.

If planned correctly, almost every major can benefit from the opportunity to add this minor with as little as one additional course beyond your core requirements.

How it Works

To obtain this minor, you must satisfy two courses from each department (6 hours each), and then you can choose an approved elective (3 hours), designated by the Ethics Minor Committee.  

Note that Religion and Philosophy majors may count only one of the ethics courses from that major toward the ethics minor requirement in that department.

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
Philosophy ethics courses – 6 hours
PHIL 210: Phil. of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL 215: Intro to Ethics 3 None
PHIL 280: Applied Ethics 3 None
9 hrs.
Religion ethics courses – 6 hours
REL 109: Exploring Christian Ethics 3 None
REL 220: Taking Human Life 3 None
REL 308: Faith and Society 3 None
REL 401: Sem. in Christian Ethics 3 REL 106 or 109
Any Approved Elective – 3 hours 3 (variable)
15 hrs.
Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies Major provides students with an opportunity to complete a degree with a primary foundation in practical thinking and ethics.  In addition, the student will develop this foundation through the choice of two concentrations in either the humanities, the sciences, or a business-oriented practicum.  It will conclude with a capstone thesis, that will require the student to unify the foundation with the concentrations into a cohesive understanding.

This program has two unique advantages.  (1) It prepares students for a broad range of careers across fields such as marketing, supply chain management, social work, hospitality services, and finance.  Entrepreneurial graduates might start their own business or work for businesses in related areas.  (2) Yet it also empowers our students to become careful, critical thinkers, and to learn how to apply principles of integrity and ethical decision-making to address real-world issues.  Both of these are central to the mission of AU.

BS in Interdisciplinary Studies (Revised: 1/2020)

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Ethics/Practical Thinking Foundations Sequence
PHIL 220* – Practical Thinking 3
MATH 110* – Finite Mathematics 3 Two years of high school algebra
MATH 208* – Elementary Statistics 3 Math ACT score of 18 or above, or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH 100
PHIL 320 – Symbolic Logic 3 PHIL 220 recommended
PHIL 210* – Philosophy of Human Nature 3
PHIL 215 – Ethics 3
REL 109 – Exploring Christian Ethics 3
REL 220* – Taking Human Life 3
 
Choose two from the following: 6
Note: If not selected as part of the foundation, any 300+ level course below may be taken as part of a concentration.
MATH 223 – Discrete Mathematics I (3) Three years of high school college prep math
PHIL 280H* – Workplace Ethics (3)
PHIL 280D – Bioethics (3)
PHIL 280B* – Environmental Ethics (3)
REL 400 – Christian Literature (3) REL 106 or REL 109
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
CS 320* – Cyber Ethics (3)
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
30 hours

Complete 2 of the following Concentrations:

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Art and Design:
Any 300-level art history course (3)
 
English:
Any 300-level course or higher (3) ENG 102
ENG 314* – Literature and Gender (3) ENG 102
ENG 330* – African Literature (3) ENG 102
 
Foreign Language:
FL 315* – French Women Writers (3)
 
History:
HIST 321 – Warfare: Ancient and Modern (3)
 
Journalism and Digital Media:
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
JDM 405* – Global Impact of Social Media (3) Junior status
 
Philosophy:
CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 – Science as a Cultural Force (3) Any natural science core course
Religion:
REL 308 – Faith and Society (3) REL 106, REL 107 or REL 109
REL 400 – Christian Literature (3) REL 106
REL 404 – Seminar in Christian Theology (3) REL 106 or REL 109
Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Biology:
BIO 129 – Drugs, Poisons, Pollutants, and the Human Perception of Risk (3)
 
Chemistry, Geology, and Physics
CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 – Science as a Cultural Force (3) Any natural science core course
PHYS 320 – Origins of the Universe (3) High school algebra and trigonometry
 
Communication Studies:
COM 302* – Intercultural Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 304* – Interpersonal Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 305 – Organizational Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 343* – Conflict, Mediation, and Negotiation (3) COM 101 or COM 120
 
Computer Science:
CS 320* – Cyber Ethics (3)
 
Economics:
ECON 301 – Game Theory (3) Core math/logic requirement
ECON 342 – Global Economics (3) ECON 232 or ECON 233
 
Political Science:
POLSC 343 – Western Political Thought: Ancient Political Thought (3) POLSC 101
POLSC 345 – Western Political Thought: Early Modern Political Thought (3) POLSC 101
 
Psychology:
PSYC 305 – Social Psychology (3) PSYC 101
PSYC 307 – Personality (3) PSYC 101
PSYC 330 – Health Psychology (3) PSYC 101
 
Social Work:
SOCWK 304 – Human Behavior Across the Lifespan (3) SOCWK 221 or sophomore status
SOCWK 305 – Family Violence (3)
SOCWK 306 – Social Environment and Human Behavior (3) SOC 301 or co-requisite
SOCWK 350 – Death and Dying (3)
 
Sociology:
SOC 301* – Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Issues (3)
SOC 340* – Marriage and Family (3)
SOC 352* – Deviance (3)
Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Economics:
ECON 334* – Money and Banking (3) ECON 233
ECON 348* – Business Analytics (3) MATH 208
 
Entrepreneurship (3)
ENTP 345* – Entrepreneurial and Family Business Management (3) ENTP 245, MGT 240, MKT 233
 
Finance:
FIN 322* – Personal Asset Management (3) Sophomore status
 
Health and Risk/Public relations (pre-req. of Com 120 preferred):
COM 205* – Intro. to Public Relations (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 320* – Health Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 420* – Health Public Relations (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
COM 425* – Risk and Crisis Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
COM 370* – Informatics in Health Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
 
Hospitality:
HSM 135 – Intro. to the Hospitality Industry (3)
HSM 235* – Hospitality Cost Control (3) MATH 208
HSM 334 – Management of Institutional Employees (3) Sophomore status
HSM 335* – Environmental Management (3)
 
Supply-Chain Management:
SCM 243 – Procurement (3) MKT 233
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility and Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
SCM 316* – Supply Chain Management (3) MATH 208, MKT 233, or MGT 240
SCM 350 – Logistics (3) SCM 316
 
Marketing:
MKT 233* – Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 311* – Market Analysis and Research (3) IS 221, MKT 233, and MATH 208
MKT 326 – Consumer Behavior (3) PSYC 101
 
Merchandising/Retail:
MKT 314* – Advertising principles (3) MKT 233
MKT 315* – Retail Merchandising (3) MKT 233
 
Management:
MGT 240* – Introduction to Management (3)
MGT 318* – Organizational Behavior (3) MGT 240
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240

*Courses currently available online or in development

Note: Students who choose to take CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 may count it either for the Science or the Humanities concentration, but not both.

Capstone

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
IDS 490 - Capstone Thesis 1 Senior Status

Total Concentration Hours: 30

Total Hours: 61

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations & Four-Year Guides

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

COURSE ROTATIONS & FOUR YEAR GUIDES

Master Syllabi

Feel free to browse our Master Syllabi for courses included in the university core program.

All Master Syllabi for Philosophy

For more information about advanced courses and topics, please contact the department:

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Current Academic Year

Alumni

If you are an alumnus or alumna, please be sure to take our EXIT survey. We would love to have updated information about you, as well as get your opinion about the value of our program in your life.

The link to our EXIT survey

Organizations

American Philosophical Association

American Philosophical Association

The American Philosophical Association was founded in 1900 to promote the exchange of ideas among philosophers, to encourage creative and scholarly activity in philosophy, to facilitate the professional work and teaching of philosophers and to represent philosophy as a discipline.

Having grown from a few hundred members to over 10,000, the American Philosophical Association is one of the largest philosophical societies in the world and the only American philosophical society not devoted to a particular school or philosophical approach.

Society of Christian Philosophers

Society of Christian Philosophers

The Society of Christian Philosophers was organized in 1978 to promote fellowship among Christian Philosophers and to stimulate study and discussion of issues which arise from their Christian and philosophical commitments. One of its chief aims is to go beyond the usual philosophy of religion sessions at the American Philosophical Association and to stimulate thinking about the nature and role of Christian commitment in philosophy.

Ohio Philosophical Association

Ohio Philosophical Association

The Ohio Philosophical Association has existed as a section of the Ohio College Association since 1931. The College Association was founded in 1867.

The Ohio Philosophical Association has as its purpose the encouragement of "research in philosophy in the colleges and universities in Ohio." The membership comprises all those who teach philosophy in institutions which are members of the Ohio College Association and those who are members of this Association at the age of retirement.

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau is the International Honor Society in Philosophy. Founded in 1930 and incorporated as a nonprofit corporation in 1955, the Society now has a network of over 200 chapters throughout the United States and Canada, at both public and private institutions of higher learning. The purpose of Phi Sigma Tau is to encourage interest and activity among students and to promote ties between philosophy departments in accredited institutions.

Ashland University's PHI SIGMA TAU, Ohio Mu Chapter, honors students who have demonstrated academic excellence in philosophy.  Membership is by invitation, selected from students who meet the following minimum conditions: have completed 9 semester hours of philosophy, with a GPA of at least 3.5 in two of those classes, and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

2017-18 Members

  • Nicholas Bartulovic
  • Dennis Clark
  • Kristin Fellure
  • Braeden Fitzgerald
  • Morgan Harrison
  • Meagan Kemmerer
  • Morgan Miller
  • Bethany Schlemmer
  • Naomi Sims
  • Lainy Spies
  • Sebastian Vidika
AU Philosophy Club

AU Philosophy Club

Members of the Ashland Philosophy Club are interested in philosophy, getting together, eating pizza, watching the occasional movie, and getting into existential trouble. If you don't believe us, just ask...

Meetings are commonly held twice a month during the semester. We also conduct our traditional Socrates Café discussions (called Soccafés, for short), like to host movie nights and participate in the occasional Phil Core Brannigan (the existential trouble we just mentioned above).

To find out about our schedule please watch for fliers on campus, click on the link above, or you can email one of the officers to get on the email list.

Everyone and anyone is welcome, no philosophy background necessary.

Be sure to check out our WALL, DOCS and LINKS on the FB page. It's all good stuff!

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Mark Hamilton
Dr. Mark Hamilton
Associate Professor of Philosophy, NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative
206, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5135 / mhamilto@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
Dr. Mancha
Dr. Louis Mancha
Chair, Department of Philosophy, Associate Professor of Philosophy
202, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5894 / lmancha@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
William Vaughan core director philosophy academic excellence logic
Dr. William Vaughan
Professor of Philosophy
208, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5654 / wvaughan@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy

Philosophy News

Deborah Fleming wins prestigious PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel Award


The Philosophy Dept. would like to extend its congratulations to our colleague, Deborah Fleming, who recently was awarded the prestigious PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel award for the "Art of the Essay" category.


Dr. Fleming, Professor of English at Ashland University, was awarded the highly prestigious prize in New York City earlier this week. Her book Resurrection of the Wild: Meditations on Ohio's Natural Landscape was chosen from an impressive list of finalists.

Previous winners of this award include such literary giants as: Ursula K. Le Guin, James Wolcott, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Marilynne Robinson. 

Read more about the award here: https://pen.org/literary-award/pendiamonstein-spielvogel-award-for-the-art-of-the-essay-10000/

Congratulations to Dr. Fleming on this fantastic recognition for her work!




Read more about the praise this book has garnered here: http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/2020/we-have-a-winner-resurrection-of-the-wild-wins-2020-pendiamonstein-spielvogel-award-for-the-art-of-the-essay/

Purchase Dr. Fleming's book at your local bookstore or here:
https://www.amazon.com/Resurrection-Wild-Meditations-Natural-Landscape/dp/1606353756...Read more

World Logic Day




Today is World Logic Day. Created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), it was first celebrated in 2019.

Held annually on January 14th, World Logic Day was established to “bring the intellectual history, conceptual significance and practical implications of logic to the attention of interdisciplinary science communities and the broader public."

To read more about this important event, click here!

...Read more

Upcoming Bretzlaff Talk!

 
Francis J. Beckwith is Professor of Philosophy & Church-State Studies at Baylor University, where he also serves as associate director of the graduate program in philosophy. He is the author of over 100 academic articles, book chapters, reference entries, and reviews. Among his nearly twenty books are Never Doubt Thomas: The Catholic Aquinas as Evangelical and Protestant (Baylor University Press, 2019), Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case Against Abortion Choice(Cambridge University Press, 2007), Return to Rome: Confessions of an Evangelical Catholic (Brazos Press, 2009), Politics For Christians: Statecraft As Soulcraft (IVP, 2010), and Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith (Cambridge University Press, 2015), winner of the American Academy of Religion’s prestigious 2016 Book Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Constructive-Reflective Studies. A graduate of the Washington University School of Law in St. Louis (M.J.S.), as well as Fordham University—where he earned the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy--he has held visiting appointments at the University of Colorado, Boulder (2016-17 Visiting Professor of Conservative Thought & Policy), the University of Notre Dame (2008-2009 Mary Ann Remick Senior Visiting Fellow in the Center for Ethics & Culture), and Princeton University (2002-2003 Visiting Research Fellow in the James Madison Program)....Read more

International Photo Contest



 Share your photos taken abroad with us for a chance to win a prize!Entry form: https://ashland.abroadoffice.net/contest.html...Read more

Contact Us

Contact Us

Dr. Louis Mancha

Chair, Department of Philosophy
202 Center for Humanities Bixler
lmancha@ashland.edu
419.289.5894

Administrative Assistant

Lindsay Brandon-Smith
203 Center for Humanities, Bixler (CFHB)
419.289.5110
lbrando2@ashland.edu

Department e-mail

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Programs

Programs

Philosophy Major

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy

Course Number and Title Hrs. Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104, 205, 208 or 217) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 210, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320)   3 none
2 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314)  6 PHIL 104, 205, 
208, 210, 215 or 217
3 PHIL electives (300 level or above) 9
24 hrs.

Note: At least 15 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Philosophy Minor

Why consider minoring in Philosophy?

The Philosophy minor is designed to complement most major programs at Ashland. Training in philosophy will help you enhance your critical thinking, analytical writing, and historical reasoning, regardless of your major or plan of study. You’ll find these skills valuable in all areas of your personal and professional life.

To graduate with a Philosophy minor, you’ll take the following courses:

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
1 intro course (PHIL 104, 205, 208 or 217) 3 none
1 ethics course (PHIL 210, 215 or 280) 3 none
1 logic course (PHIL 220 or 320) 3 none
1 hist. courses (PHIL 311, 312, 313 or 314) 3 PHIL 104, 205, 
208, 210, 215 or 217
1 PHIL elective (300 level or above) 3
15 hrs.

Note: At least 6 hours of coursework must be taken at the 300 level or above.

Ethics Minor

Embracing an Ethical Mindset

Are you interested in studying the difference between right and wrong, good and bad, with a special emphasis on discovering the reasons why people make such judgments?

Ashland University's unique ethics minor is shared between the Philosophy and Religion departments to train you to be more ethically diverse and aware of your global responsibilities.

If planned correctly, almost every major can benefit from the opportunity to add this minor with as little as one additional course beyond your core requirements.

How it Works

To obtain this minor, you must satisfy two courses from each department (6 hours each), and then you can choose an approved elective (3 hours), designated by the Ethics Minor Committee.  

Note that Religion and Philosophy majors may count only one of the ethics courses from that major toward the ethics minor requirement in that department.

Course Number and TitleHrs.Prerequisites
Philosophy ethics courses – 6 hours
PHIL 210: Phil. of Human Nature 3 None
PHIL 215: Intro to Ethics 3 None
PHIL 280: Applied Ethics 3 None
9 hrs.
Religion ethics courses – 6 hours
REL 109: Exploring Christian Ethics 3 None
REL 220: Taking Human Life 3 None
REL 308: Faith and Society 3 None
REL 401: Sem. in Christian Ethics 3 REL 106 or 109
Any Approved Elective – 3 hours 3 (variable)
15 hrs.
Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies Major provides students with an opportunity to complete a degree with a primary foundation in practical thinking and ethics.  In addition, the student will develop this foundation through the choice of two concentrations in either the humanities, the sciences, or a business-oriented practicum.  It will conclude with a capstone thesis, that will require the student to unify the foundation with the concentrations into a cohesive understanding.

This program has two unique advantages.  (1) It prepares students for a broad range of careers across fields such as marketing, supply chain management, social work, hospitality services, and finance.  Entrepreneurial graduates might start their own business or work for businesses in related areas.  (2) Yet it also empowers our students to become careful, critical thinkers, and to learn how to apply principles of integrity and ethical decision-making to address real-world issues.  Both of these are central to the mission of AU.

BS in Interdisciplinary Studies (Revised: 1/2020)

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Ethics/Practical Thinking Foundations Sequence
PHIL 220* – Practical Thinking 3
MATH 110* – Finite Mathematics 3 Two years of high school algebra
MATH 208* – Elementary Statistics 3 Math ACT score of 18 or above, or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH 100
PHIL 320 – Symbolic Logic 3 PHIL 220 recommended
PHIL 210* – Philosophy of Human Nature 3
PHIL 215 – Ethics 3
REL 109 – Exploring Christian Ethics 3
REL 220* – Taking Human Life 3
 
Choose two from the following: 6
Note: If not selected as part of the foundation, any 300+ level course below may be taken as part of a concentration.
MATH 223 – Discrete Mathematics I (3) Three years of high school college prep math
PHIL 280H* – Workplace Ethics (3)
PHIL 280D – Bioethics (3)
PHIL 280B* – Environmental Ethics (3)
REL 400 – Christian Literature (3) REL 106 or REL 109
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
CS 320* – Cyber Ethics (3)
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
30 hours

Complete 2 of the following Concentrations:

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Art and Design:
Any 300-level art history course (3)
 
English:
Any 300-level course or higher (3) ENG 102
ENG 314* – Literature and Gender (3) ENG 102
ENG 330* – African Literature (3) ENG 102
 
Foreign Language:
FL 315* – French Women Writers (3)
 
History:
HIST 321 – Warfare: Ancient and Modern (3)
 
Journalism and Digital Media:
JDM 303 – Media Law & Ethics (3)
JDM 405* – Global Impact of Social Media (3) Junior status
 
Philosophy:
CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 – Science as a Cultural Force (3) Any natural science core course
Religion:
REL 308 – Faith and Society (3) REL 106, REL 107 or REL 109
REL 400 – Christian Literature (3) REL 106
REL 404 – Seminar in Christian Theology (3) REL 106 or REL 109
Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Biology:
BIO 129 – Drugs, Poisons, Pollutants, and the Human Perception of Risk (3)
 
Chemistry, Geology, and Physics
CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 – Science as a Cultural Force (3) Any natural science core course
PHYS 320 – Origins of the Universe (3) High school algebra and trigonometry
 
Communication Studies:
COM 302* – Intercultural Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 304* – Interpersonal Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 305 – Organizational Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 343* – Conflict, Mediation, and Negotiation (3) COM 101 or COM 120
 
Computer Science:
CS 320* – Cyber Ethics (3)
 
Economics:
ECON 301 – Game Theory (3) Core math/logic requirement
ECON 342 – Global Economics (3) ECON 232 or ECON 233
 
Political Science:
POLSC 343 – Western Political Thought: Ancient Political Thought (3) POLSC 101
POLSC 345 – Western Political Thought: Early Modern Political Thought (3) POLSC 101
 
Psychology:
PSYC 305 – Social Psychology (3) PSYC 101
PSYC 307 – Personality (3) PSYC 101
PSYC 330 – Health Psychology (3) PSYC 101
 
Social Work:
SOCWK 304 – Human Behavior Across the Lifespan (3) SOCWK 221 or sophomore status
SOCWK 305 – Family Violence (3)
SOCWK 306 – Social Environment and Human Behavior (3) SOC 301 or co-requisite
SOCWK 350 – Death and Dying (3)
 
Sociology:
SOC 301* – Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Issues (3)
SOC 340* – Marriage and Family (3)
SOC 352* – Deviance (3)
Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
Economics:
ECON 334* – Money and Banking (3) ECON 233
ECON 348* – Business Analytics (3) MATH 208
 
Entrepreneurship (3)
ENTP 345* – Entrepreneurial and Family Business Management (3) ENTP 245, MGT 240, MKT 233
 
Finance:
FIN 322* – Personal Asset Management (3) Sophomore status
 
Health and Risk/Public relations (pre-req. of Com 120 preferred):
COM 205* – Intro. to Public Relations (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 320* – Health Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120
COM 420* – Health Public Relations (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
COM 425* – Risk and Crisis Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
COM 370* – Informatics in Health Communication (3) COM 101 or COM 120, Junior status
 
Hospitality:
HSM 135 – Intro. to the Hospitality Industry (3)
HSM 235* – Hospitality Cost Control (3) MATH 208
HSM 334 – Management of Institutional Employees (3) Sophomore status
HSM 335* – Environmental Management (3)
 
Supply-Chain Management:
SCM 243 – Procurement (3) MKT 233
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility and Business Ethics (3) MGT 240
SCM 316* – Supply Chain Management (3) MATH 208, MKT 233, or MGT 240
SCM 350 – Logistics (3) SCM 316
 
Marketing:
MKT 233* – Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 311* – Market Analysis and Research (3) IS 221, MKT 233, and MATH 208
MKT 326 – Consumer Behavior (3) PSYC 101
 
Merchandising/Retail:
MKT 314* – Advertising principles (3) MKT 233
MKT 315* – Retail Merchandising (3) MKT 233
 
Management:
MGT 240* – Introduction to Management (3)
MGT 318* – Organizational Behavior (3) MGT 240
MGT 343* – Social Responsibility & Business Ethics (3) MGT 240

*Courses currently available online or in development

Note: Students who choose to take CHEM/GEOL/PHYS/PHIL 350 may count it either for the Science or the Humanities concentration, but not both.

Capstone

Course Number and TitleHoursPrerequisites
IDS 490 - Capstone Thesis 1 Senior Status

Total Concentration Hours: 30

Total Hours: 61

Curriculum

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations & Four-Year Guides

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

COURSE ROTATIONS & FOUR YEAR GUIDES

Master Syllabi

Feel free to browse our Master Syllabi for courses included in the university core program.

All Master Syllabi for Philosophy

For more information about advanced courses and topics, please contact the department:

au-philosophy@ashland.edu

Current Academic Year

Alumni

Alumni

If you are an alumnus or alumna, please be sure to take our EXIT survey. We would love to have updated information about you, as well as get your opinion about the value of our program in your life.

The link to our EXIT survey

Organizations

Organizations

American Philosophical Association

American Philosophical Association

The American Philosophical Association was founded in 1900 to promote the exchange of ideas among philosophers, to encourage creative and scholarly activity in philosophy, to facilitate the professional work and teaching of philosophers and to represent philosophy as a discipline.

Having grown from a few hundred members to over 10,000, the American Philosophical Association is one of the largest philosophical societies in the world and the only American philosophical society not devoted to a particular school or philosophical approach.

Society of Christian Philosophers

Society of Christian Philosophers

The Society of Christian Philosophers was organized in 1978 to promote fellowship among Christian Philosophers and to stimulate study and discussion of issues which arise from their Christian and philosophical commitments. One of its chief aims is to go beyond the usual philosophy of religion sessions at the American Philosophical Association and to stimulate thinking about the nature and role of Christian commitment in philosophy.

Ohio Philosophical Association

Ohio Philosophical Association

The Ohio Philosophical Association has existed as a section of the Ohio College Association since 1931. The College Association was founded in 1867.

The Ohio Philosophical Association has as its purpose the encouragement of "research in philosophy in the colleges and universities in Ohio." The membership comprises all those who teach philosophy in institutions which are members of the Ohio College Association and those who are members of this Association at the age of retirement.

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau

Phi Sigma Tau is the International Honor Society in Philosophy. Founded in 1930 and incorporated as a nonprofit corporation in 1955, the Society now has a network of over 200 chapters throughout the United States and Canada, at both public and private institutions of higher learning. The purpose of Phi Sigma Tau is to encourage interest and activity among students and to promote ties between philosophy departments in accredited institutions.

Ashland University's PHI SIGMA TAU, Ohio Mu Chapter, honors students who have demonstrated academic excellence in philosophy.  Membership is by invitation, selected from students who meet the following minimum conditions: have completed 9 semester hours of philosophy, with a GPA of at least 3.5 in two of those classes, and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

2017-18 Members

  • Nicholas Bartulovic
  • Dennis Clark
  • Kristin Fellure
  • Braeden Fitzgerald
  • Morgan Harrison
  • Meagan Kemmerer
  • Morgan Miller
  • Bethany Schlemmer
  • Naomi Sims
  • Lainy Spies
  • Sebastian Vidika
AU Philosophy Club

AU Philosophy Club

Members of the Ashland Philosophy Club are interested in philosophy, getting together, eating pizza, watching the occasional movie, and getting into existential trouble. If you don't believe us, just ask...

Meetings are commonly held twice a month during the semester. We also conduct our traditional Socrates Café discussions (called Soccafés, for short), like to host movie nights and participate in the occasional Phil Core Brannigan (the existential trouble we just mentioned above).

To find out about our schedule please watch for fliers on campus, click on the link above, or you can email one of the officers to get on the email list.

Everyone and anyone is welcome, no philosophy background necessary.

Be sure to check out our WALL, DOCS and LINKS on the FB page. It's all good stuff!

Faculty & Staff

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Mark Hamilton
Dr. Mark Hamilton
Associate Professor of Philosophy, NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative
206, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5135 / mhamilto@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
Dr. Mancha
Dr. Louis Mancha
Chair, Department of Philosophy, Associate Professor of Philosophy
202, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5894 / lmancha@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy
William Vaughan core director philosophy academic excellence logic
Dr. William Vaughan
Professor of Philosophy
208, Center for the Humanities of Bixler Hall
419.289.5654 / wvaughan@ashland.edu
Department of Philosophy

Philosophy News

Philosophy News

Deborah Fleming wins prestigious PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel Award


The Philosophy Dept. would like to extend its congratulations to our colleague, Deborah Fleming, who recently was awarded the prestigious PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel award for the "Art of the Essay" category.


Dr. Fleming, Professor of English at Ashland University, was awarded the highly prestigious prize in New York City earlier this week. Her book Resurrection of the Wild: Meditations on Ohio's Natural Landscape was chosen from an impressive list of finalists.

Previous winners of this award include such literary giants as: Ursula K. Le Guin, James Wolcott, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Marilynne Robinson. 

Read more about the award here: https://pen.org/literary-award/pendiamonstein-spielvogel-award-for-the-art-of-the-essay-10000/

Congratulations to Dr. Fleming on this fantastic recognition for her work!




Read more about the praise this book has garnered here: http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/2020/we-have-a-winner-resurrection-of-the-wild-wins-2020-pendiamonstein-spielvogel-award-for-the-art-of-the-essay/

Purchase Dr. Fleming's book at your local bookstore or here:
https://www.amazon.com/Resurrection-Wild-Meditations-Natural-Landscape/dp/1606353756...Read more

World Logic Day




Today is World Logic Day. Created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), it was first celebrated in 2019.

Held annually on January 14th, World Logic Day was established to “bring the intellectual history, conceptual significance and practical implications of logic to the attention of interdisciplinary science communities and the broader public."

To read more about this important event, click here!

...Read more

Upcoming Bretzlaff Talk!

 
Francis J. Beckwith is Professor of Philosophy & Church-State Studies at Baylor University, where he also serves as associate director of the graduate program in philosophy. He is the author of over 100 academic articles, book chapters, reference entries, and reviews. Among his nearly twenty books are Never Doubt Thomas: The Catholic Aquinas as Evangelical and Protestant (Baylor University Press, 2019), Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case Against Abortion Choice(Cambridge University Press, 2007), Return to Rome: Confessions of an Evangelical Catholic (Brazos Press, 2009), Politics For Christians: Statecraft As Soulcraft (IVP, 2010), and Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith (Cambridge University Press, 2015), winner of the American Academy of Religion’s prestigious 2016 Book Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Constructive-Reflective Studies. A graduate of the Washington University School of Law in St. Louis (M.J.S.), as well as Fordham University—where he earned the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy--he has held visiting appointments at the University of Colorado, Boulder (2016-17 Visiting Professor of Conservative Thought & Policy), the University of Notre Dame (2008-2009 Mary Ann Remick Senior Visiting Fellow in the Center for Ethics & Culture), and Princeton University (2002-2003 Visiting Research Fellow in the James Madison Program)....Read more

International Photo Contest



 Share your photos taken abroad with us for a chance to win a prize!Entry form: https://ashland.abroadoffice.net/contest.html...Read more

Cultivating a Love of Wisdom

It’s one thing to make a living, and another thing to learn how to live well. Studying Philosophy at Ashland University can help you do both.

Philosophy Department Differentiators

Ashland University’s Philosophy Department is one of the few programs of its size to offer comprehensive study both in analytical philosophy—with an emphasis on logic, reasoning, and analysis—and continental philosophy—with its emphasis on aesthetics and literary approaches to thought.

Other department differentiators include:

  • 100 percent full-time, tenured, and research-experienced faculty who are completely hands-on in the classroom

  • Many program options including a Philosophy major and minor along with an ethics minor to expand your options depending on your career objective

  • A unique, thorough sequence in the history of philosophy focused on primary texts to empower you with the most significant ideas of the past and present

Our Mission

It is the intrinsic mission of the Philosophy Department to cultivate students in the love of wisdom. The Philosophy Department provides students with the tools to be educated and productive members of the world, regardless of their profession or vocation. While other departments focus on specific topics and work-related skills, it is the duty of the Philosophy Department to teach students the love of learning itself, to seek purpose in their lives, and to make informed, objective, and consistent judgments. When students are instructed in the love of wisdom, they learn not only how to make a living, but how to live well.

Support the Department of Philosophy

By donating any amount you're making a big difference in our department's future. To designate your gift to the Department of Philosophy , select “Other” in the "Designated Options" and type the department's name in the associated box.

Christian Services

Christian Services