Making Your Mark with Ashland University's Dietetics Program

Are you passionate about healthy eating and interested in counseling others about nutrition to improve their well-being?

Look no further than Ashland University’s Dietetics program. You’ll find it will expertly prepare you for a career in the diverse field of nutrition and dietetics.

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
239, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 123 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2021

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 222 H.S. Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 223 H.S. Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 76 (87) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47 hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 123 hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

If GPA graduation requirements are met a student will receive a verification statement from the Ashland University Dietetics program.

Completing Your Degree

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) are food and nutrition experts who have met the following criteria to earn the RD credential:

  • Completed a minimum of a bachelor's degree at a US regionally accredited university or college and course work accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND®) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, such as the Ashland University Dietetics Program.
  • Completed an ACEND®-accredited supervised practice program at a health-care facility, community agency, or a foodservice corporation or combined with undergraduate or graduate studies. Typically, a practice program will run six to 12 months in length.
  • Passed a national examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). For more information regarding the examination, refer to CDR's website at www.cdrnet.org.
  • Completed continuing professional educational requirements to maintain registration.

Some RDs hold additional certifications in specialized areas of practice. These are awarded through CDR, the credentialing agency for the Academy, and/or other medical and nutrition organizations and are recognized within the profession, but are not required. Some of the certifications include pediatric or renal nutrition, sports dietetics, nutrition support and diabetes education.

Per ACEND and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics the Dietetic Internship Match is a computer-based method which provides an orderly and fair way to match the preferences of applicants for Dietetic Internships (DIs) with the preferences of DI program directors. The Academy contracts with a company called D&D Digital to operate the DI Match and help applicants obtain an Internship (supervised practice position). The information on the DI match process may be found on the ACEND website and is available at https://www.eatrightpro.org/acend/students-and-advancing-education/dietetic-internship-match-students. Information about different supervised practice programs is updated regularly by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and can be accessed from the Academy web site. The information on Supervised Practice Programs is listed under Accredited Education Programs and is available at http://www.eatright.org/. This information is consistent with what is stated in the AU Dietetic Student handbook.

Effective January 1, 2024, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) will require a minimum of a master’s degree to be eligible to take the credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). In order to be approved for registration examination eligibility with a bachelor’s degree, an individual must meet all eligibility requirements and be submitted into CDR's Registration Eligibility Processing System (REPS) before 12:00 midnight Central Time, December 31, 2023. For more information about this requirement visit CDR's website: https://www.cdrnet.org/graduatedegree. In addition, CDR requires that individuals complete coursework and supervised practice in program(s) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). Graduates who successfully complete the ACEND-accredited Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics at Ashland University are eligible to apply to an ACEND-accredited supervised practice program.

In most states, graduates also must obtain licensure or certification to practice. For more information about state licensure requirements.

Learn more about exams to further your career:

For more information about educational pathways to become a RDN.

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DPD) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparations for entry into post-baccalaureate supervised practice leading to eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

Program Goal 1: The AU DPD will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited supervised practice program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Sixty percent of program graduates apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Fifty percent of program graduates are admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Fifty percent or more of AU DPD graduates not going into a supervised practice program, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Program Goal 2: The AU DPD will prepare graduates to become competent entry-level dietitians through completion of the dietetics program which further leads to completion of a supervised practice program, passing of the RDN exam, and employment in the field of nutrition and dietetics.

Objective 2.1: The AU DPD one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DPD graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings regarding preparation for supervised practice on the supervised practice program director’s satisfaction survey.

Objective 2.3: Seventy-five percent or more of AU DPD graduates who complete a supervised practice program will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 2.4: At least 80% of AU DPD students complete program/degree requirements within 3 years (150% of the program length).

Blog

Kidney Disease and Diet

Doctors are prescribing eating plans to patients with kidney disease to track the amount of sodium, potassium, and protein they are eating. A surplus of these can cause kidney function to decline further. A registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) will create a meal plan that is specific to each patient and take into consideration their food preferences as well as lifestyle choices.Protein:In the body, the job of protein is to build, repair and maintain cells as well as supply energy when it is needed. If the kidneys are not functioning properly, they can not handle a lot of protein. It is important to eat enough carbohydrates and fats to get the energy the body needs. The small amounts of proteins that are consumed will be used to repair and build cells. With the diet plan, the major sources of protein will include eggs, meat, poultry, and fish. Some bread, cereal, and vegetables contain a small amount of protein too.
Sodium:Retention of fluids and an increase in blood pressure are side effects of sodium. Extra fluid and sodium can build up in the body for people with kidney disease, and it can affect the heart and lungs. The new eating plan can include lowering sodium intake. It is important to read the nutrition facts panel when grocery shopping because most foods, especially processed foods, contain sodium. Some foods have salt substitutes that contain potassium with may also need to be limited.
Potassium:It is important to keep potassium balanced similarly to sodium. Like sodium, potassium levels can rise if the kidneys are not functioning properly. High levels of potassium affect heart rhythm, so the RDN will explain how to stay within the limit. Potassium is found in foods such as dairy, fruits and vegetables, and beans and nuts. Potassium levels in foods are required to...Read more

4 Types of Foods to Support Memory

When feeling forgetful it can be due to several reasons such as lack of sleep, genetics, lifestyle, level of physical activity, and environmental factors along with other reasons. Diet plays a part in the role of the brain and keeping it healthy. Researchers have found that the Mediterranean Diet may help with aging brains stay sharp. Evidence has linked foods that are in the Mediterranean Diet with better memory, staying more alert, and better cognitive function. 
Adding these foods into your diet can support memory and help the brain.
Vegetables: Getting a sufficient amount of vegetables in one’s diet such as cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and dark leafy greens they can help improve one’s memory. Try new foods that you may not typically pick such as a kale salad or when ordering a sandwich get collard greens as the tortilla. 
Berries and Cherries: Berries, especially dark colored berries such as blueberries and blackberries along with cherries have anthocyanins which are dark colored pigments found in plants and other flavonoids in the berries and cherries may support memory function. You can add berries and cherries into your meals by having them as a snack, adding them into your cereals, or even desserts. They can be fresh, frozen, or dried and still offer benefits to you.
Adequate intake of omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids or DHA are essential for brains health and may help improve memory. Some good sources of DHA include seafood, algae, and fatty fish such as salmon, sardines, herring, and bluefin tuna. To get a healthy dose of DHA substitute other meats for fish once or twice a week. Fish can be grilled, baked, or broiled. If you do not eat fish, you can discuss other options for you with your doctor or registered dietitian. DHA can be taken in...Read more

Iron

The main purpose of iron is to carry oxygen in the hemoglobin of red blood cells for energy production. It is also beneficial in removing carbon dioxide from the body. Iron deficiency anemia can develop if iron stores get so low that not enough red blood cells are made for oxygen transport.Symptoms of low iron include:FatigueWeaknessBody temperature fluctuationsDizzinessHeadachePale skin and fingernailsGlossitis (inflamed tongue)
Although iron is found in many foods, some people, especially adolescent girls and women 19 to 50 may not consume enough iron on a daily basis. This is concerning in those who are pregnant or capable of being pregnant. Healthcare professionals can assess the amounts of iron in the body and if levels are low, they may make changes to the patient's diet or have them take iron supplements. 
It is important for babies to get enough iron as it is needed for growth and development of the brain. Enough iron is stored for the first four to six months of life. Babies who are premature or have a low birth weight and are breastfed may be given supplements by a pediatrician. Most formula is fortified with iron; but once six months are exceeded, iron needs increase so solid foods can be introduced if the baby is developmentally ready because they will provide more sources of iron. 
Recommended Daily Allowance (RDAs) for Iron
Gender/Age Iron RDA
Children 1-3 7mgChildren 4-8 10mgChildren 9-13 8mgMales 14-18 11mgFemales 14-18 15mgMales 19+ 8mgFemales 19-50 18mgFemales 51+ 8mg
Heme and non-heme are two types of iron found in food. Animal products contain both types and are absorbed by the body better. Plant products contain non-heme iron. For better absorption of iron from plant products, health care professionals recommend eating them with animal products or good sources of vitamin C like strawberries or bell peppers. A good way to...Read more

Chicken Pot Pie Bundles

Ingredients:1 ½ tablespoons canola oil (divided)1 large carrot, peeled and cut into ¼ inch pieces (about 1 cup)½ small onion, cut into ¼ inch pieces (about ½ cup)2 cloves garlic (minced)1lb boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (cut into ½ pieces)2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon (½ teaspoon if using dried)½ teaspoon saltPinch black pepper1 cup chicken broth4 teaspoons cornstarch¾ cup frozen petite peas (thawed)¾ cup frozen corn (thawed)12 egg roll wraps2 tablespoons parmesan cheese (grated)
Directions:
Wash your hands before you begin
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the carrot and onion and cook, stirring frequently until softened (about 5 minutes). Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more.Stir in the chicken, tarragon, salt and pepper. Cook until the chicken is no longer pink, about 5 minutes.Place the broth and cornstarch in a bowl and whisk until well combined. Add to the skillet along with the peas and corn, and bring the liquid to a simmer, stirring constantly. Continue to simmer and stir gently until the sauce thickens, about 2 minutes.To prepare the bundles, use a muffin pan with 12 medium-size cups (do not coat with nonstick cooking spray). Gently place 1 egg roll wrap into each cup, letting it extend over the sides.Place a generous ¼ cup of the chicken mixture into each wrap, and sprinkle Parmesan cheese on top. Fold the corners up and over the top of the filling, and press to seal the edges (it doesn't have to be perfect!). Brush the remaining oil on top of each bundle.Bake until golden and crisp, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool slightly before eating.Nutrition Information:Serving Size: 2 bundlesServes: 6Calories: 360: Total Fat: 7g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Sodium: 680mg; Total Carbohydrate: 48g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Protein: 24g; Vitamin A: 70%;...Read more

Contact Us

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
239, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Program Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 123 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2021

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 222 H.S. Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 223 H.S. Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 76 (87) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47 hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 123 hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

If GPA graduation requirements are met a student will receive a verification statement from the Ashland University Dietetics program.

Completing Your Degree

Completing Your Degree

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) are food and nutrition experts who have met the following criteria to earn the RD credential:

  • Completed a minimum of a bachelor's degree at a US regionally accredited university or college and course work accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND®) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, such as the Ashland University Dietetics Program.
  • Completed an ACEND®-accredited supervised practice program at a health-care facility, community agency, or a foodservice corporation or combined with undergraduate or graduate studies. Typically, a practice program will run six to 12 months in length.
  • Passed a national examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). For more information regarding the examination, refer to CDR's website at www.cdrnet.org.
  • Completed continuing professional educational requirements to maintain registration.

Some RDs hold additional certifications in specialized areas of practice. These are awarded through CDR, the credentialing agency for the Academy, and/or other medical and nutrition organizations and are recognized within the profession, but are not required. Some of the certifications include pediatric or renal nutrition, sports dietetics, nutrition support and diabetes education.

Per ACEND and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics the Dietetic Internship Match is a computer-based method which provides an orderly and fair way to match the preferences of applicants for Dietetic Internships (DIs) with the preferences of DI program directors. The Academy contracts with a company called D&D Digital to operate the DI Match and help applicants obtain an Internship (supervised practice position). The information on the DI match process may be found on the ACEND website and is available at https://www.eatrightpro.org/acend/students-and-advancing-education/dietetic-internship-match-students. Information about different supervised practice programs is updated regularly by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and can be accessed from the Academy web site. The information on Supervised Practice Programs is listed under Accredited Education Programs and is available at http://www.eatright.org/. This information is consistent with what is stated in the AU Dietetic Student handbook.

Effective January 1, 2024, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) will require a minimum of a master’s degree to be eligible to take the credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). In order to be approved for registration examination eligibility with a bachelor’s degree, an individual must meet all eligibility requirements and be submitted into CDR's Registration Eligibility Processing System (REPS) before 12:00 midnight Central Time, December 31, 2023. For more information about this requirement visit CDR's website: https://www.cdrnet.org/graduatedegree. In addition, CDR requires that individuals complete coursework and supervised practice in program(s) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). Graduates who successfully complete the ACEND-accredited Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics at Ashland University are eligible to apply to an ACEND-accredited supervised practice program.

In most states, graduates also must obtain licensure or certification to practice. For more information about state licensure requirements.

Learn more about exams to further your career:

For more information about educational pathways to become a RDN.

Goals & Objectives

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DPD) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparations for entry into post-baccalaureate supervised practice leading to eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

Program Goal 1: The AU DPD will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited supervised practice program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Sixty percent of program graduates apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Fifty percent of program graduates are admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Fifty percent or more of AU DPD graduates not going into a supervised practice program, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Program Goal 2: The AU DPD will prepare graduates to become competent entry-level dietitians through completion of the dietetics program which further leads to completion of a supervised practice program, passing of the RDN exam, and employment in the field of nutrition and dietetics.

Objective 2.1: The AU DPD one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DPD graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings regarding preparation for supervised practice on the supervised practice program director’s satisfaction survey.

Objective 2.3: Seventy-five percent or more of AU DPD graduates who complete a supervised practice program will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 2.4: At least 80% of AU DPD students complete program/degree requirements within 3 years (150% of the program length).

Blog

Blog

Kidney Disease and Diet

Doctors are prescribing eating plans to patients with kidney disease to track the amount of sodium, potassium, and protein they are eating. A surplus of these can cause kidney function to decline further. A registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) will create a meal plan that is specific to each patient and take into consideration their food preferences as well as lifestyle choices.Protein:In the body, the job of protein is to build, repair and maintain cells as well as supply energy when it is needed. If the kidneys are not functioning properly, they can not handle a lot of protein. It is important to eat enough carbohydrates and fats to get the energy the body needs. The small amounts of proteins that are consumed will be used to repair and build cells. With the diet plan, the major sources of protein will include eggs, meat, poultry, and fish. Some bread, cereal, and vegetables contain a small amount of protein too.
Sodium:Retention of fluids and an increase in blood pressure are side effects of sodium. Extra fluid and sodium can build up in the body for people with kidney disease, and it can affect the heart and lungs. The new eating plan can include lowering sodium intake. It is important to read the nutrition facts panel when grocery shopping because most foods, especially processed foods, contain sodium. Some foods have salt substitutes that contain potassium with may also need to be limited.
Potassium:It is important to keep potassium balanced similarly to sodium. Like sodium, potassium levels can rise if the kidneys are not functioning properly. High levels of potassium affect heart rhythm, so the RDN will explain how to stay within the limit. Potassium is found in foods such as dairy, fruits and vegetables, and beans and nuts. Potassium levels in foods are required to...Read more

4 Types of Foods to Support Memory

When feeling forgetful it can be due to several reasons such as lack of sleep, genetics, lifestyle, level of physical activity, and environmental factors along with other reasons. Diet plays a part in the role of the brain and keeping it healthy. Researchers have found that the Mediterranean Diet may help with aging brains stay sharp. Evidence has linked foods that are in the Mediterranean Diet with better memory, staying more alert, and better cognitive function. 
Adding these foods into your diet can support memory and help the brain.
Vegetables: Getting a sufficient amount of vegetables in one’s diet such as cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and dark leafy greens they can help improve one’s memory. Try new foods that you may not typically pick such as a kale salad or when ordering a sandwich get collard greens as the tortilla. 
Berries and Cherries: Berries, especially dark colored berries such as blueberries and blackberries along with cherries have anthocyanins which are dark colored pigments found in plants and other flavonoids in the berries and cherries may support memory function. You can add berries and cherries into your meals by having them as a snack, adding them into your cereals, or even desserts. They can be fresh, frozen, or dried and still offer benefits to you.
Adequate intake of omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids or DHA are essential for brains health and may help improve memory. Some good sources of DHA include seafood, algae, and fatty fish such as salmon, sardines, herring, and bluefin tuna. To get a healthy dose of DHA substitute other meats for fish once or twice a week. Fish can be grilled, baked, or broiled. If you do not eat fish, you can discuss other options for you with your doctor or registered dietitian. DHA can be taken in...Read more

Iron

The main purpose of iron is to carry oxygen in the hemoglobin of red blood cells for energy production. It is also beneficial in removing carbon dioxide from the body. Iron deficiency anemia can develop if iron stores get so low that not enough red blood cells are made for oxygen transport.Symptoms of low iron include:FatigueWeaknessBody temperature fluctuationsDizzinessHeadachePale skin and fingernailsGlossitis (inflamed tongue)
Although iron is found in many foods, some people, especially adolescent girls and women 19 to 50 may not consume enough iron on a daily basis. This is concerning in those who are pregnant or capable of being pregnant. Healthcare professionals can assess the amounts of iron in the body and if levels are low, they may make changes to the patient's diet or have them take iron supplements. 
It is important for babies to get enough iron as it is needed for growth and development of the brain. Enough iron is stored for the first four to six months of life. Babies who are premature or have a low birth weight and are breastfed may be given supplements by a pediatrician. Most formula is fortified with iron; but once six months are exceeded, iron needs increase so solid foods can be introduced if the baby is developmentally ready because they will provide more sources of iron. 
Recommended Daily Allowance (RDAs) for Iron
Gender/Age Iron RDA
Children 1-3 7mgChildren 4-8 10mgChildren 9-13 8mgMales 14-18 11mgFemales 14-18 15mgMales 19+ 8mgFemales 19-50 18mgFemales 51+ 8mg
Heme and non-heme are two types of iron found in food. Animal products contain both types and are absorbed by the body better. Plant products contain non-heme iron. For better absorption of iron from plant products, health care professionals recommend eating them with animal products or good sources of vitamin C like strawberries or bell peppers. A good way to...Read more

Chicken Pot Pie Bundles

Ingredients:1 ½ tablespoons canola oil (divided)1 large carrot, peeled and cut into ¼ inch pieces (about 1 cup)½ small onion, cut into ¼ inch pieces (about ½ cup)2 cloves garlic (minced)1lb boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (cut into ½ pieces)2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon (½ teaspoon if using dried)½ teaspoon saltPinch black pepper1 cup chicken broth4 teaspoons cornstarch¾ cup frozen petite peas (thawed)¾ cup frozen corn (thawed)12 egg roll wraps2 tablespoons parmesan cheese (grated)
Directions:
Wash your hands before you begin
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the carrot and onion and cook, stirring frequently until softened (about 5 minutes). Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more.Stir in the chicken, tarragon, salt and pepper. Cook until the chicken is no longer pink, about 5 minutes.Place the broth and cornstarch in a bowl and whisk until well combined. Add to the skillet along with the peas and corn, and bring the liquid to a simmer, stirring constantly. Continue to simmer and stir gently until the sauce thickens, about 2 minutes.To prepare the bundles, use a muffin pan with 12 medium-size cups (do not coat with nonstick cooking spray). Gently place 1 egg roll wrap into each cup, letting it extend over the sides.Place a generous ¼ cup of the chicken mixture into each wrap, and sprinkle Parmesan cheese on top. Fold the corners up and over the top of the filling, and press to seal the edges (it doesn't have to be perfect!). Brush the remaining oil on top of each bundle.Bake until golden and crisp, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool slightly before eating.Nutrition Information:Serving Size: 2 bundlesServes: 6Calories: 360: Total Fat: 7g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Sodium: 680mg; Total Carbohydrate: 48g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Protein: 24g; Vitamin A: 70%;...Read more

Newsletters

Resources

What to Expect in the Dietetics Program

In today’s world, more people than ever are having health-related issues that are directly related to their nutritional intake. Ashland University’s Dietetics program will provide you with the educational knowledge to help others truly make a difference in their health. From day one in the Dietetics program, you’ll acquire a strong foundation of physical, biological, and social sciences in order to understand the social and psychological dimensions of human nutrition.

Dietetics Program Benefits

The Dietetics program at Ashland University is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). This accreditation certifies our program as a highly-regarded program – which means that as a graduate, you’ll be eligible to apply for highly competitive ACEND-accredited supervised practice programs.

Other program benefits include:

  • Supervised practice program match rates significantly above national average
  • Accent on the Individual with small class sizes and passionate faculty mentorship
  • Guaranteed career success proven by a historically high number of Dietetic graduates receiving a full-time job offer within the field of Nutrition and Dietetics

There’s no better time than the present to start your path toward making lives healthier at one of Ashland University's most prestigious undergraduate programs.

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND)
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190
Chicago, IL  60606-6995
Phone: 800/877-1600 ext. 5400
Email: ACEND@eatright.org
https://www.eatrightpro.org/acend

About the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

When you complete the Dietetics program at Ashland University, you’ll be awarded a B.S. degree and a Verification Statement of completion of the AU Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. (“Didactic” refers to the specific teaching method we use.) The completion of a supervised practice program is required before you’re eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential. Please see the Completing your Degree tab for full information on the pathway to becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. AU Dietetic program costs may be found on page 12 in the AU Dietetics Student Handbook.

Dietetics Career Outlook

Future Employment

The Dietetics program prepares you to become a practitioner in clinical, community, food industry, and other food service areas of nutrition. Registered Dietitians are employed by hospitals, community agencies, and various food service areas of nutrition.

Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an Occupational Handbook for Dietitians and Nutritionists.

Average Career Salary

$59,410; with those in business and consulting earning above $87,000

Anticipated Career Growth

The average growth rate for this field is 15 percent by 2026, much faster than the average growth of other occupations

Career Opportunities

  • Hospitals
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Clinics
  • Private practice
  • Government or private organizations

Ashland University is now offering more scholarships than ever!

Ashland University is now offering more scholarships than ever!