Making Your Mark in a Nationally Ranked Dietetics Program

Are you passionate about healthy eating and interested in counseling others about nutrition to improve their well-being?

Look no further than Ashland University’s nationally ranked Dietetics program. You’ll find it’s one of the top nutrition programs in the United States and one of only four fully accredited programs in Ohio that will expertly prepare you for a career in the diverse field of nutrition and dietetics.

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Admission Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. “Following completion of the DP, completing an ACEND-accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination established by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DP) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparation for entry into post-baccalaureate dietetics internships, eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Over a five-year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Over a five-year period, at least 50% of DP graduates will be admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of program graduates who complete a supervised internship will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 1.4: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Objective 1.5: Over a five-year period, the pass rate of AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80%.

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

Objective 2.1: Over a five-year period, the AU DP one year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervised practice program directors or employers in at least 75% of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist graduates in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage graduates to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

Objective 3.1: At least 80% of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will complete the program/degree requirements within 3 years, 150% of the program length.

Objective 3.2: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion.

Objective 3.3: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have completed >20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD

Blog

New Treatment Possibility for Type 1 Diabetes

In people that are developing type 1 diabetes, beta cells are being destroyed by the body's immune system. These beta cells come from the pancreatic islets and help to regulate blood sugar levels. Prevention of this development is important because type 1 diabetes is incurable. A research team examined the thousands of proteins present in beta cells and identified one specifically that could be involved in the disease process. The protein focused on was growth differentiation factor (GDF 15), which has been previously known to have protective effects for cells. The researchers discovered a depletion of GDF 15 in the pancreatic islets of those with diabetes. The biggest finding in the study was a 53% decrease in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice after being treated with GDF 15. The researchers attributed these results to the protective effect of the GDF 15 on the pancreatic islet cells, helping prevent or possibly reverse type 1 diabetes. Mirmira stated, “This thinking is somewhat counterintuitive in the type 1 diabetes field, but it is this kind of out-of-the-box thinking that may lead to therapies we never thought of previously.” For more information, visit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200109140958.htm 
...Read more

Risks of Low-Calorie Diets

Your resting metabolic rate makes up most of the energy you need to consume from food. Your body needs energy to perform basic biological functions, like digestion, breathing, and pumping blood. Eating too few calories won’t allow your body to function properly in the following ways:Not getting enough nutrientsConsuming enough nutrients in your diet is important for long term health. For example, calcium is stored in your bones until age 30, then your body stops gaining bone mass, and you must either get calcium from your diet or break down bone tissue to release calcium. If you are not consuming enough calories, you are most likely not consuming enough of most nutrients, leading to deficiencies.Metabolism slowsWhen you don’t consume enough calories, your body will go into starvation mode, causing metabolism to slow in an attempt to conserve energy. Signs of slow metabolism include feeling sluggish and cold and having gastrointestinal issues.Reduced Brain PowerYour brain runs on glucose, so when you aren’t consuming enough calories, your brain doesn’t have as much power to work at peak capacity. Your brain needs a constant supply of glucose to keep everything running well. If you are always hungry, your brain won’t be working at its best.Gallstone FormationDiets that severely restrict calories can cause rapid weight loss, which can lead to gallstones. These may cause abdominal pain and require surgery.Overall, talk to a registered dietitian to find out how many calories are right for your body and your needs.Source: https://www.eatright.org/health/weight-loss/your-health-and-your-weight/4-ways-low-calorie-diets-can-sabotage-your-health 
...Read more

Memory-Boosting Foods

Do you struggle with memory? Forgetfulness can be tied to a number of things, such as lack of sleep, level of physical activity, genetics, and environmental factors. Along with this, nutrition can play a big role regarding memory. Try including the following foods in your daily diet overtime in order to improve brain health. 
Vegetables: Eating vegetables is always important, but broccoli, cabbage, and dark leafy greens may be able to help improve memory. Kale salad and broccoli stir fry are two options that would be a great way to include these veggies in your everyday diet. 
Berries: Darker berries, such as blackberries, blueberries, and cherries are rich in anthocyanins and other flavonoids that could help improve memory. Fresh, frozen, or dried berries could all possibly have this positive effect on brain health. 
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may be able to help improve memory function. Salmon, bluefin tuna, sardines, and herring are all good sources of DHA. Salmon tacos would be a great dinner idea to include some of these fatty acids. 
Walnuts: While walnuts have been known to improve heart health, they may also be able to improve cognitive function. Try adding walnuts to oatmeal or a salad in order to incorporate them into your diet. 
For more information regarding these foods, go to: https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/healthy-aging/memory-boosting-foods
...Read more

Flu vs. Food Poisoning

Every year there are about 48 million foodborne illnesses and about 3,000 deaths. Influenza and food poisoning have similar symptoms; however, the flu has respiratory problems, such as chest discomfort and nasal congestion and can be prevented by vaccines. Foodborne illnesses are carried or transmitted by humans not properly handling food. Foodborne illnesses rarely have respiratory problems, but it’s common for there to be gastrointestinal problems, such as vomiting and diarrhea. Foodborne illnesses can be prevented by handling food properly, such as washing your hands and food, separating raw meat from coming in contact with other food, cooking the food thoroughly, and refrigerating food. Those with weakened immune systems, the elderly, younger children, and pregnant women are at greater risk when infected. 
For more information, visit: https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food-poisoning/flu-vs-food-poisoning


...Read more

Contact Us

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. “Following completion of the DP, completing an ACEND-accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination established by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Goals & Objectives

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DP) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparation for entry into post-baccalaureate dietetics internships, eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Over a five-year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Over a five-year period, at least 50% of DP graduates will be admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of program graduates who complete a supervised internship will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 1.4: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Objective 1.5: Over a five-year period, the pass rate of AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80%.

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

Objective 2.1: Over a five-year period, the AU DP one year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervised practice program directors or employers in at least 75% of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist graduates in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage graduates to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

Objective 3.1: At least 80% of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will complete the program/degree requirements within 3 years, 150% of the program length.

Objective 3.2: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion.

Objective 3.3: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have completed >20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD

Blog

Blog

New Treatment Possibility for Type 1 Diabetes

In people that are developing type 1 diabetes, beta cells are being destroyed by the body's immune system. These beta cells come from the pancreatic islets and help to regulate blood sugar levels. Prevention of this development is important because type 1 diabetes is incurable. A research team examined the thousands of proteins present in beta cells and identified one specifically that could be involved in the disease process. The protein focused on was growth differentiation factor (GDF 15), which has been previously known to have protective effects for cells. The researchers discovered a depletion of GDF 15 in the pancreatic islets of those with diabetes. The biggest finding in the study was a 53% decrease in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice after being treated with GDF 15. The researchers attributed these results to the protective effect of the GDF 15 on the pancreatic islet cells, helping prevent or possibly reverse type 1 diabetes. Mirmira stated, “This thinking is somewhat counterintuitive in the type 1 diabetes field, but it is this kind of out-of-the-box thinking that may lead to therapies we never thought of previously.” For more information, visit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200109140958.htm 
...Read more

Risks of Low-Calorie Diets

Your resting metabolic rate makes up most of the energy you need to consume from food. Your body needs energy to perform basic biological functions, like digestion, breathing, and pumping blood. Eating too few calories won’t allow your body to function properly in the following ways:Not getting enough nutrientsConsuming enough nutrients in your diet is important for long term health. For example, calcium is stored in your bones until age 30, then your body stops gaining bone mass, and you must either get calcium from your diet or break down bone tissue to release calcium. If you are not consuming enough calories, you are most likely not consuming enough of most nutrients, leading to deficiencies.Metabolism slowsWhen you don’t consume enough calories, your body will go into starvation mode, causing metabolism to slow in an attempt to conserve energy. Signs of slow metabolism include feeling sluggish and cold and having gastrointestinal issues.Reduced Brain PowerYour brain runs on glucose, so when you aren’t consuming enough calories, your brain doesn’t have as much power to work at peak capacity. Your brain needs a constant supply of glucose to keep everything running well. If you are always hungry, your brain won’t be working at its best.Gallstone FormationDiets that severely restrict calories can cause rapid weight loss, which can lead to gallstones. These may cause abdominal pain and require surgery.Overall, talk to a registered dietitian to find out how many calories are right for your body and your needs.Source: https://www.eatright.org/health/weight-loss/your-health-and-your-weight/4-ways-low-calorie-diets-can-sabotage-your-health 
...Read more

Memory-Boosting Foods

Do you struggle with memory? Forgetfulness can be tied to a number of things, such as lack of sleep, level of physical activity, genetics, and environmental factors. Along with this, nutrition can play a big role regarding memory. Try including the following foods in your daily diet overtime in order to improve brain health. 
Vegetables: Eating vegetables is always important, but broccoli, cabbage, and dark leafy greens may be able to help improve memory. Kale salad and broccoli stir fry are two options that would be a great way to include these veggies in your everyday diet. 
Berries: Darker berries, such as blackberries, blueberries, and cherries are rich in anthocyanins and other flavonoids that could help improve memory. Fresh, frozen, or dried berries could all possibly have this positive effect on brain health. 
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may be able to help improve memory function. Salmon, bluefin tuna, sardines, and herring are all good sources of DHA. Salmon tacos would be a great dinner idea to include some of these fatty acids. 
Walnuts: While walnuts have been known to improve heart health, they may also be able to improve cognitive function. Try adding walnuts to oatmeal or a salad in order to incorporate them into your diet. 
For more information regarding these foods, go to: https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/healthy-aging/memory-boosting-foods
...Read more

Flu vs. Food Poisoning

Every year there are about 48 million foodborne illnesses and about 3,000 deaths. Influenza and food poisoning have similar symptoms; however, the flu has respiratory problems, such as chest discomfort and nasal congestion and can be prevented by vaccines. Foodborne illnesses are carried or transmitted by humans not properly handling food. Foodborne illnesses rarely have respiratory problems, but it’s common for there to be gastrointestinal problems, such as vomiting and diarrhea. Foodborne illnesses can be prevented by handling food properly, such as washing your hands and food, separating raw meat from coming in contact with other food, cooking the food thoroughly, and refrigerating food. Those with weakened immune systems, the elderly, younger children, and pregnant women are at greater risk when infected. 
For more information, visit: https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food-poisoning/flu-vs-food-poisoning


...Read more

Resources

What to Expect in the Dietetics Program

In today’s world, more people than ever are having health-related issues that are directly related to their nutritional intake. Ashland University’s top Dietetics program will provide you with the educational knowledge to help others truly make a difference in their health. From day one in the Dietetics program, you’ll acquire a strong foundation of physical, biological, and social sciences in order to understand the social and psychological dimensions of human nutrition.

Dietetics Program Benefits

The Dietetics program at Ashland University is fully accredited by the Accreditation of Nutrition & Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (AND). This accreditation certifies our program as a highly-regarded program—which means that as a graduate, you’ll be eligible to apply for a highly competitive ACEND-accredited dietetic internship.

Other program benefits include:

  • 100% graduate pass rate on the RDN exam
  • Accent on the Individual with small class sizes and passionate faculty mentorship
  • Guaranteed career success proven by a historically high number of Dietetics students receiving a full-time job offers by graduation

There’s no better time than the present to start your path toward making lives healthier at one of Ashland University's most prestigious undergraduate programs.

About the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

 When you complete the Dietetics program at Ashland University, you’ll be awarded a B.S. degree and a Verification Statement of completion of the AU didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. (“Didactic” refers to the specific teaching method we use.) The completion of an accredited dietetic internship is required before you’re eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential.

Dietetics Career Outlook

Future Employment

The Dietetics program prepares you to become a practitioner in clinical, community, food industry, and other food service areas of nutrition. Registered Dietitians are employed by hospitals, community agencies, and various food service areas of nutrition.

Learn more about exams to further your career:

Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an Occupational Handbook for Dietitians and Nutritionists.

Average Career Salary

$59,410; with those in business and consulting earning above $87,000

Anticipated Career Growth

The average growth rate for this field is 15 percent by 2026, much faster than the average growth of other occupations

Career Opportunities

  • Hospitals
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Clinics
  • Private practice
  • Government or private organizations

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