Making Your Mark in a Nationally Ranked Dietetics Program

Are you passionate about healthy eating and interested in counseling others about nutrition to improve their well-being?

Look no further than Ashland University’s nationally ranked Dietetics program. You’ll find it’s one of the top nutrition programs in the United States and one of only four fully accredited programs in Ohio that will expertly prepare you for a career in the diverse field of nutrition and dietetics.

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. “Following completion of the DP, completing an ACEND-accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination established by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DP) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparation for entry into post-baccalaureate dietetics internships, eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Over a five-year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Over a five-year period, at least 50% of DP graduates will be admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of program graduates who complete a supervised internship will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 1.4: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Objective 1.5: Over a five-year period, the pass rate of AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80%.

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

Objective 2.1: Over a five-year period, the AU DP one year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervised practice program directors or employers in at least 75% of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist graduates in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage graduates to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

Objective 3.1: At least 80% of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will complete the program/degree requirements within 3 years, 150% of the program length.

Objective 3.2: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion.

Objective 3.3: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have completed >20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD

Blog

Watching Out for Fad Diets

If a diet product seems too good to be true, it most likely is. Our society is very focused on weight, so fad diets and weight-loss products are frequently pushed on consumers with impressive claims and testimonials. However, there is no food or pill that can burn fat or alter your genetics. These products are many times not regulated and can even be harmful to your health. The following are claims to look out for in weight loss plans or products:Rapid weight loss:Losing weight quickly may make you feel good in the short term, but it makes you more likely to regain the weight. This can also cause you to lose not just fat, but muscle, bone, and water weight as well.Limitations:Don’t follow diets that limit large amounts of foods or cut out entire food groups unless medically necessary. It will be boring to eat the same foods all the time, making the plan more difficult to stick to in the long run. Plus, following a rigid meal plan can be overwhelming and make meal time more complicated than it needs to be. These restrictive diets can cause you to miss out on important nutrients your body needs. If you can’t follow a way of eating for the rest of your life, then the plan is most likely not worth following.Specific food combinations:Eating certain foods together or eating foods at certain times of day has no evidence to support that it helps in losing weight.No need to exercise: Regular exercise is beneficial for health. It is best to find an activity you enjoy so that it is easier to stick to. Focusing on being active for 30-60 minutes most days is a good place to start.Overall, focus on eating what makes you feel good and energized, and don’t be pulled...Read more

Slow-Cooker Chicken Tacos Recipe

Ingredients:2 teaspoons ground cumin½ teaspoon salt½ teaspoon black pepper3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 12 thighs)1 ½ tablespoons canola oil, divided1 large onion, chopped2 stalks celery, chopped1 large carrot, peeled and chopped1 medium jalapeno, sliced into thin rings (optional)4 cloves garlic, minced2 ½ cups salsa verde (green tomatillo salsa), divided½ cup fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth24 (6-inch) corn tortillas¼ cup crumbled queso fresco cheese¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves2 lines, cut into wedges (optional)
Directions:Before you begin: wash your hands.1. In a small bowl, combine cumin, salt, and pepper. Rub mixture evenly over chicken thighs. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add half of chicken; cook 3 minutes per side or until browned. Transfer to a 5-or-6-quart slow cooker. Repeat procedure with remaining chicken.2. Heat remaining ½ tablespoon oil in pan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, carrot, jalapeno, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, 5 to 7 minutes or until vegetables are tender and begin to brown. Transfer to slow cooker. Add 2 cups salsa and broth. Cover and cook on low 4 to 6 hours or until chicken shreds easily with a fork.3. Remove chicken to a large bowl using a slotted spoon; shred with 2 forks.4. Warm tortillas according to package instructions. Fill each tortilla with about ¼ cup chicken mixture, 1 teaspoon cheese, 1 teaspoon salsa and ½ teaspoon cilantro. Serve with lime wedges if desired. 
Nutrition Information: Serving Size: 2 tacosServes 6 
Source: https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/recipes/slow-cooker-chicken-tacos-recipe
...Read more

Mediterranean Benefits

The Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) has been around as long as the 1940’s and 50’s. The Mediterranean region was the first to adopt this type of diet and lifestyle. The diet focuses on fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes, nuts, whole grains, and healthy fats like olive oil. This diet limits dairy, poultry, and eggs. The consumption of little to no processed foods but many fruits and vegetables has been strongly linked to a reduced risk of developing several chronic diseases like heart disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The results of a study called “Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet: Insights From the PREDIMED Study” revealed favorable effects of two different versions of the MeDiets on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, lipoprotein particles, inflammation, oxidative stress, and carotid atherosclerosis. Like this one, there are many studies supporting the Mediterranean diet and its benefits and should be considered as a new way of helping prevent chronic diseases.

For more information, please visit: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25940230/?from_term=mediterranean+diet+benefits&from_pos=4 
...Read more

Safe Handling Tips for Raw Meat

As summer temperatures start to happen, grilling becomes more popular. Food safety for sausage, hamburgers, ribs, and other types of meat must be kept in mind to reduce your risk of food poisoning.

Shop Smart 
Look for a "safe food handling" label on the package. This label explains how to safely store, prepare, and handle raw meat at home.Choose packages that are tightly wrapped. This helps prevent raw meat from leaking juices onto other foods in the cart.Ask to have raw meat bagged separately from other groceries at the checkout.Store Safely
Always handle food after washing your hands.Store raw meat on the lowest shelf in the refrigerator.When refrigerated, use ground meats within two days of purchase. Whole cuts of meat, such as pork chops, steak and ribs, should be used within three to five days of purchase. Prepare Wisely
Wash hands thoroughly for at least 20 seconds before, during, and after preparing food, especially after handling raw meat.Defrost frozen meat in the refrigerator, microwave, or under cold running water. Never defrost on the counter!Use two separate cutting boards to avoid cross-contamination. Use one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood, and the other for ready-to-eat foods.Use a food thermometer to ensure foods are cooked to their proper internal temperature. Whole cuts of meat, such as steaks, chops or roasts should be cooked to 145°F, and ground meats should be 160°F. Chicken and turkey should always be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165°F.Keep meat refrigerated. Discard any food left unrefrigerated for more than two hours, or one hour if the temperature is above 90°F.Source: https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food/safe-handling-tips-for-raw-meat...Read more

Contact Us

Contact Us

Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5452
dreed8@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Program Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. “Following completion of the DP, completing an ACEND-accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination established by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Goals & Objectives

Goals & Objectives

The Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AU DP) mission is to provide the foundational knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to encourage the development of ethical behavior, intellectual growth, critical thought, communication and problem solving skills, in preparation for entry into post-baccalaureate dietetics internships, eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, professional employment, and/or graduate school, as well as developing students to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community.

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, or graduate school.

Objective 1.1: Over a five-year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.2: Over a five-year period, at least 50% of DP graduates will be admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

Objective 1.3: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of program graduates who complete a supervised internship will be employed in dietetics within 12 months.

Objective 1.4: Over a five-year period, 50% or more of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.

Objective 1.5: Over a five-year period, the pass rate of AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80%.

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

Objective 2.1: Over a five-year period, the AU DP one year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Objective 2.2: At least 80% of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervised practice program directors or employers in at least 75% of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist graduates in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage graduates to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

Objective 3.1: At least 80% of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will complete the program/degree requirements within 3 years, 150% of the program length.

Objective 3.2: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion.

Objective 3.3: At least 75% of AU DP graduates will have completed >20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Denise Reed, MS, RDN, LD

Blog

Blog

Watching Out for Fad Diets

If a diet product seems too good to be true, it most likely is. Our society is very focused on weight, so fad diets and weight-loss products are frequently pushed on consumers with impressive claims and testimonials. However, there is no food or pill that can burn fat or alter your genetics. These products are many times not regulated and can even be harmful to your health. The following are claims to look out for in weight loss plans or products:Rapid weight loss:Losing weight quickly may make you feel good in the short term, but it makes you more likely to regain the weight. This can also cause you to lose not just fat, but muscle, bone, and water weight as well.Limitations:Don’t follow diets that limit large amounts of foods or cut out entire food groups unless medically necessary. It will be boring to eat the same foods all the time, making the plan more difficult to stick to in the long run. Plus, following a rigid meal plan can be overwhelming and make meal time more complicated than it needs to be. These restrictive diets can cause you to miss out on important nutrients your body needs. If you can’t follow a way of eating for the rest of your life, then the plan is most likely not worth following.Specific food combinations:Eating certain foods together or eating foods at certain times of day has no evidence to support that it helps in losing weight.No need to exercise: Regular exercise is beneficial for health. It is best to find an activity you enjoy so that it is easier to stick to. Focusing on being active for 30-60 minutes most days is a good place to start.Overall, focus on eating what makes you feel good and energized, and don’t be pulled...Read more

Slow-Cooker Chicken Tacos Recipe

Ingredients:2 teaspoons ground cumin½ teaspoon salt½ teaspoon black pepper3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 12 thighs)1 ½ tablespoons canola oil, divided1 large onion, chopped2 stalks celery, chopped1 large carrot, peeled and chopped1 medium jalapeno, sliced into thin rings (optional)4 cloves garlic, minced2 ½ cups salsa verde (green tomatillo salsa), divided½ cup fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth24 (6-inch) corn tortillas¼ cup crumbled queso fresco cheese¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves2 lines, cut into wedges (optional)
Directions:Before you begin: wash your hands.1. In a small bowl, combine cumin, salt, and pepper. Rub mixture evenly over chicken thighs. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add half of chicken; cook 3 minutes per side or until browned. Transfer to a 5-or-6-quart slow cooker. Repeat procedure with remaining chicken.2. Heat remaining ½ tablespoon oil in pan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, carrot, jalapeno, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, 5 to 7 minutes or until vegetables are tender and begin to brown. Transfer to slow cooker. Add 2 cups salsa and broth. Cover and cook on low 4 to 6 hours or until chicken shreds easily with a fork.3. Remove chicken to a large bowl using a slotted spoon; shred with 2 forks.4. Warm tortillas according to package instructions. Fill each tortilla with about ¼ cup chicken mixture, 1 teaspoon cheese, 1 teaspoon salsa and ½ teaspoon cilantro. Serve with lime wedges if desired. 
Nutrition Information: Serving Size: 2 tacosServes 6 
Source: https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/recipes/slow-cooker-chicken-tacos-recipe
...Read more

Mediterranean Benefits

The Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) has been around as long as the 1940’s and 50’s. The Mediterranean region was the first to adopt this type of diet and lifestyle. The diet focuses on fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes, nuts, whole grains, and healthy fats like olive oil. This diet limits dairy, poultry, and eggs. The consumption of little to no processed foods but many fruits and vegetables has been strongly linked to a reduced risk of developing several chronic diseases like heart disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The results of a study called “Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet: Insights From the PREDIMED Study” revealed favorable effects of two different versions of the MeDiets on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, lipoprotein particles, inflammation, oxidative stress, and carotid atherosclerosis. Like this one, there are many studies supporting the Mediterranean diet and its benefits and should be considered as a new way of helping prevent chronic diseases.

For more information, please visit: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25940230/?from_term=mediterranean+diet+benefits&from_pos=4 
...Read more

Safe Handling Tips for Raw Meat

As summer temperatures start to happen, grilling becomes more popular. Food safety for sausage, hamburgers, ribs, and other types of meat must be kept in mind to reduce your risk of food poisoning.

Shop Smart 
Look for a "safe food handling" label on the package. This label explains how to safely store, prepare, and handle raw meat at home.Choose packages that are tightly wrapped. This helps prevent raw meat from leaking juices onto other foods in the cart.Ask to have raw meat bagged separately from other groceries at the checkout.Store Safely
Always handle food after washing your hands.Store raw meat on the lowest shelf in the refrigerator.When refrigerated, use ground meats within two days of purchase. Whole cuts of meat, such as pork chops, steak and ribs, should be used within three to five days of purchase. Prepare Wisely
Wash hands thoroughly for at least 20 seconds before, during, and after preparing food, especially after handling raw meat.Defrost frozen meat in the refrigerator, microwave, or under cold running water. Never defrost on the counter!Use two separate cutting boards to avoid cross-contamination. Use one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood, and the other for ready-to-eat foods.Use a food thermometer to ensure foods are cooked to their proper internal temperature. Whole cuts of meat, such as steaks, chops or roasts should be cooked to 145°F, and ground meats should be 160°F. Chicken and turkey should always be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165°F.Keep meat refrigerated. Discard any food left unrefrigerated for more than two hours, or one hour if the temperature is above 90°F.Source: https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food/safe-handling-tips-for-raw-meat...Read more

Resources

What to Expect in the Dietetics Program

In today’s world, more people than ever are having health-related issues that are directly related to their nutritional intake. Ashland University’s top Dietetics program will provide you with the educational knowledge to help others truly make a difference in their health. From day one in the Dietetics program, you’ll acquire a strong foundation of physical, biological, and social sciences in order to understand the social and psychological dimensions of human nutrition.

Dietetics Program Benefits

The Dietetics program at Ashland University is fully accredited by the Accreditation of Nutrition & Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (AND). This accreditation certifies our program as a highly-regarded program—which means that as a graduate, you’ll be eligible to apply for a highly competitive ACEND-accredited dietetic internship.

Other program benefits include:

  • 100% graduate pass rate on the RDN exam
  • Accent on the Individual with small class sizes and passionate faculty mentorship
  • Guaranteed career success proven by a historically high number of Dietetics students receiving a full-time job offers by graduation

There’s no better time than the present to start your path toward making lives healthier at one of Ashland University's most prestigious undergraduate programs.

About the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

 When you complete the Dietetics program at Ashland University, you’ll be awarded a B.S. degree and a Verification Statement of completion of the AU didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. (“Didactic” refers to the specific teaching method we use.) The completion of an accredited dietetic internship is required before you’re eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential.

Dietetics Career Outlook

Future Employment

The Dietetics program prepares you to become a practitioner in clinical, community, food industry, and other food service areas of nutrition. Registered Dietitians are employed by hospitals, community agencies, and various food service areas of nutrition.

Learn more about exams to further your career:

Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an Occupational Handbook for Dietitians and Nutritionists.

Average Career Salary

$59,410; with those in business and consulting earning above $87,000

Anticipated Career Growth

The average growth rate for this field is 15 percent by 2026, much faster than the average growth of other occupations

Career Opportunities

  • Hospitals
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Clinics
  • Private practice
  • Government or private organizations

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