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Making Your Mark in a Nationally Ranked Dietetics Program

Are you passionate about healthy eating and interested in counseling others about nutrition to improve their well-being?

Look no further than Ashland University’s nationally ranked Dietetics program. You’ll find it’s one of the top nutrition programs in the United States and one of only four fully accredited programs in Ohio that will expertly prepare you for a career in the diverse field of nutrition and dietetics.

Contact Us

David F. Vanata, Ph.D., RD, CSSD, LD
Associate Professor of Health Science, Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5292
dvanata@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Admission Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. Following completion of the DP, completing an accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Blog

Fall Produce Picks to Add to Your Plate

Autumn is on the way, so it’s the perfect time to celebrate the seasonal foods it brings. Go to your local market and fill your basket with these fall produce picks.
Pumpkin Pumpkin is packed with fiber and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, giving pumpkin its orange color, converts into vitamin A in the body, which is helpful for your skin and eyes. Add herbs to the pumpkin to balance its sweetness.
Beets Beets are edible from the leafy greens down to the round root. The leaves are similar to spinach leaves and are great sautéed. The red color in beets is caused by a phytochemical called betanin. This red juice can be used as a natural food coloring. Beets have nitrates that are naturally occurring and could help to support healthy blood pressure. Beets are great roasted or steamed and are delicious raw or shredded and tossed in salads.
Sweet Potato Sweet potatoes go ahead of white potatoes in terms of fiber and vitamin A, and they are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. Try them as a breakfast side dish or serve them at any meal. Just bake them in the oven whole or cube them up.
Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti squash is a fun vegetable that is lower in calories and is a gluten free alternative to grain pasta. Cut it in half, scoop the pocket of seeds out and pop the two halves into the oven and bake until tender. Once done, scrape a fork into it and spaghetti like strands will appear. Toss with pesto or marinara sauce, or just season it for a quick veggie side dish.
Kale Kale is a scrumptious leafy green that is a nutrient powerhouse. It tastes sweeter after a frost and... Read more

Coffee

The research on whether coffee helps or hurts our bodies is indecisive and constantly changing year to year. A recent study from science daily declared that there is a connection between a decreased chance of developing gallstones from drinking coffee. This article was released on September 5th, 2019. Drinking six or more cups of coffee per day compared to those not drinking coffee resulted in a 23% lower risk of developing symptomatic gallstones in 104,493 subjects. Only a 3% lower risk was associated with those who drank one cup of coffee per day. Although the statistics may be low for decreasing gallstone development, the benefits of coffee drinking reach much further than just this one disease.
For more information, visit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190905080059.htm
Read more

Food Sensitivity Tests: Are They Worth It?

Food sensitivity tests are becoming more and more popular, but are they accurate? The current evidence to support food sensitivity blood tests is limited. Food sensitivity is not actually a medical diagnoses and is different from food allergies and intolerances. Food allergies are an immune system reaction where the body reacts to a substance found in a food or group of foods. It typically identifies this substance as harmful and creates antibodies to fight it off, causing adverse symptoms. Food intolerances are not an immune system reaction, but are related to digested food. Many times, someone with a food intolerance does not have a certain enzyme to digest a food or has a reaction to additives in foods. These people may be able to eat small amounts of certain foods that they are intolerant to without any adverse effects. Food sensitivity currently has no medical definition and is many times used as an umbrella term over food allergy and food intolerance.

Food sensitivity blood tests are gaining popularity, but there is no evidence to show that they are accurate in diagnosing food sensitivities. Food allergy testing tests for a protein called IgE. The presence of this protein indicates an immune system response. However, food sensitivity tests look for an IgG antibody. IgG levels have not been shown to accurately diagnose food sensitivities or allergies and can be higher or lower based on foods more recently eaten, not based on what foods someone may be allergic to. These tests may cause someone to unnecessarily avoid foods in their diets that are harmful to them. If you believe you have a food sensitivity, the best thing to do is to make an appointment with your healthcare provider or registered dietitian.

Source: https://www.eatright.org/health/allergies-and-intolerances/food-intolerances-and-sensitivities/are-food-sensitivity-tests-accurate... Read more

Energy-Boosting Nutrition Tips

As a society, we often overwork ourselves and need energy. It is very easy to get busy and stressed, which can lead to the effects of poor physical activity and eating habits. All of these things can contribute to low energy levels. Maintaining a more healthful eating pattern can be one way to boost energy. Following these five nutrition tips can be a good way to increase your energy.
Eat Regularly. One way to help fuel a healthy metabolism can be to eat every three to four hours. This can help you feel better and be more focused, while also preventing between-meal hunger that can lead to poor snacking habits and overeating at meals. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues. You should eat just enough to help curve your cravings and reduce your chances of overeating. Make sure that you only eat until you are comfortably full but not stuffed. Balance your plate. A balanced meal incorporates several different food groups. The food groups that you should balance are whole grains, lean protein, fruits, vegetables, and fat-free or low-fat dairy. Small amounts of healthy fats should also be incorporated into your meals for sustained energy. Be careful with snacks. Keep in mind that snacks are not supposed to fill you up; they should only be used to bridge you from one meal to the next. When choosing snacks, try to choose foods that have lean protein and fiber-rich carbohydrates. An apple and a handful of unsalted nuts would be a great example of this. Remove energy zappers. Try to limit beverages with added sugars, such as soda, sugary coffee, and energy drinks. These types of beverages may give you a boost of energy for about an hour, but they will likely end up causing an energy crash... Read more

Goals and Objectives

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, graduate school or obtain professional credentialing. 

  • Objective 1.1   Over a five-year period, at least 60 percent of AU DP graduates will apply to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.
  • Objective 1.2   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of those applying to a supervised practice program in the academic year they complete the program will be accepted.
  • Objective 1.3   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of program graduates who sought employment in dietetics will be employed within 12 months of program completion.
  • Objective 1.4   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.
  • Objecitve 1.5   Over a five-year period, the pass rate for AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80 percent. 

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

  • Objective 2.1.   Over a five-year period, the pass rate for AU DP graduates taking the registration (RD) examination for the first time will be greater than or equal to 80 percent.
  • Objective 2.2   At least 80 percent of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervisors/employers in at least 75 percent of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist students in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage students to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

  • Outcome 3.1   At least 75 percent of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will meet the criteria for receiving a verification statement within three years; 150% of the program length. 
  • Objective 3.2   At least 75 percent of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Mohican Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion. 
  • Objective 3.3   At least 75 percent of AU DP graduates will have completed more than 20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Dr. David Vanata, RD, CSSD, LD

Contact Us

David F. Vanata, Ph.D., RD, CSSD, LD
Associate Professor of Health Science, Director of Dietetics
240, College of Nursing & Health Sciences
419.289.5292
dvanata@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Current Academic Year
Dietetics Four-Year Guide

Admission Requirements

Program Requirements

A student majoring in Dietetics, who is also a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must have completed all the course requirements for that particular degree and must earn 121 semester hours of college work with an overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of not less than 2.0. The grade point average in the Dietetics major field must be at least 2.25 (although a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater is recommended). Students whose semester G.P.A. falls below 2.0 but whose cumulative G.P.A. is above 2.0 will receive a letter of concern from their Academic Advising unit inviting them to review their academic performance and outlining available support services.

Institutional Core Requirements

Course Number and TitleHours
COM 101 Human Communication 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
Math 208 Elementary Statistics 3
Religion Course 3
Aesthetics -Any two approved courses 6
Humanities -Any two approved courses 6
Natural Sciences -Any two approved courses
(BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life)
(CHEM 103 General Chemistry)
8
Social Sciences-Any two approved courses
(PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology)
6
Historical Reasoning -Any approved course 3
Cultural Requirements 3
Total Institutional Core Requirements 47 hr.

Dietetics Course Requirements 2017

Course Number and TitleHours
DIET 130 Principles of Food and Meal Preparation 3
DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics 2
DIET 213 Society’s Influence on Body Image and Eating 3
DIET 230 Food Science & Applications 3
DIET 320 Human Nutrition 3
DIET 330 Nutrition Counseling Skills 3
DIET 360 Lifecycle Nutrition 3
DIET 370 Community Nutrition 3
DIET 385 Advanced Nutrition 3
DIET 395 Vitamins and Minerals 3
DIET 400 Nutrition & Disease I 3
DIET 425 Nutrition & Disease II 3
BIO 125 Anatomy & Physiology I 3
BIO 126 Anatomy & Physiology II 3
BIO 201 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life (4)**
BIO 340 Microbiology 4
CHEM 103 General Chemistry (4)**
CHEM 104 General Chemistry 4
CHEM 307 Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 307L Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 429 Biochemistry 3
EXS 309 Exercise Physiology or EXS 474 Sports Nutrition 3
HS 360 Research in Health Sciences 3
HSM 250 Food and Beverage Operation Management 3
HSM 335 Environmental Management 3
HSM 336 Food Production I 3
MATH 208 Elementary Statistics (3)**
MGT 240 Introduction to Management 3
PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (3)**
   
Total Dietetics Course Requirements 74 (85) hrs.
Institutional Core Requirements 47hrs.
Total Credits for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree 121hrs.

**Credits hours in parentheses indicate courses that meet both institutional requirements for all students, as well as requirements of the Dietetics major

Completing Your Degree

Completion of degree requirements will result in the student being awarded a Verification Statement of completion of the Ashland University Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. Following completion of the DP, completing an accredited dietetic internship program is required before students are eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential. These internships are available throughout the U.S. and you do not have to complete one only in Ohio.

Accredited Internships

Acceptance into an accredited dietetic internship program is extremely competitive. Currently, there is a significant shortage of available internship positions for the number of students applying for acceptance. Acceptance into an internship program cannot be guaranteed. Because of this shortage, it is vitally important to excel academically and gain work-related experiences to improve your chances of being accepted.

Blog

Fall Produce Picks to Add to Your Plate

Autumn is on the way, so it’s the perfect time to celebrate the seasonal foods it brings. Go to your local market and fill your basket with these fall produce picks.
Pumpkin Pumpkin is packed with fiber and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, giving pumpkin its orange color, converts into vitamin A in the body, which is helpful for your skin and eyes. Add herbs to the pumpkin to balance its sweetness.
Beets Beets are edible from the leafy greens down to the round root. The leaves are similar to spinach leaves and are great sautéed. The red color in beets is caused by a phytochemical called betanin. This red juice can be used as a natural food coloring. Beets have nitrates that are naturally occurring and could help to support healthy blood pressure. Beets are great roasted or steamed and are delicious raw or shredded and tossed in salads.
Sweet Potato Sweet potatoes go ahead of white potatoes in terms of fiber and vitamin A, and they are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. Try them as a breakfast side dish or serve them at any meal. Just bake them in the oven whole or cube them up.
Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti squash is a fun vegetable that is lower in calories and is a gluten free alternative to grain pasta. Cut it in half, scoop the pocket of seeds out and pop the two halves into the oven and bake until tender. Once done, scrape a fork into it and spaghetti like strands will appear. Toss with pesto or marinara sauce, or just season it for a quick veggie side dish.
Kale Kale is a scrumptious leafy green that is a nutrient powerhouse. It tastes sweeter after a frost and... Read more

Coffee

The research on whether coffee helps or hurts our bodies is indecisive and constantly changing year to year. A recent study from science daily declared that there is a connection between a decreased chance of developing gallstones from drinking coffee. This article was released on September 5th, 2019. Drinking six or more cups of coffee per day compared to those not drinking coffee resulted in a 23% lower risk of developing symptomatic gallstones in 104,493 subjects. Only a 3% lower risk was associated with those who drank one cup of coffee per day. Although the statistics may be low for decreasing gallstone development, the benefits of coffee drinking reach much further than just this one disease.
For more information, visit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190905080059.htm
Read more

Food Sensitivity Tests: Are They Worth It?

Food sensitivity tests are becoming more and more popular, but are they accurate? The current evidence to support food sensitivity blood tests is limited. Food sensitivity is not actually a medical diagnoses and is different from food allergies and intolerances. Food allergies are an immune system reaction where the body reacts to a substance found in a food or group of foods. It typically identifies this substance as harmful and creates antibodies to fight it off, causing adverse symptoms. Food intolerances are not an immune system reaction, but are related to digested food. Many times, someone with a food intolerance does not have a certain enzyme to digest a food or has a reaction to additives in foods. These people may be able to eat small amounts of certain foods that they are intolerant to without any adverse effects. Food sensitivity currently has no medical definition and is many times used as an umbrella term over food allergy and food intolerance.

Food sensitivity blood tests are gaining popularity, but there is no evidence to show that they are accurate in diagnosing food sensitivities. Food allergy testing tests for a protein called IgE. The presence of this protein indicates an immune system response. However, food sensitivity tests look for an IgG antibody. IgG levels have not been shown to accurately diagnose food sensitivities or allergies and can be higher or lower based on foods more recently eaten, not based on what foods someone may be allergic to. These tests may cause someone to unnecessarily avoid foods in their diets that are harmful to them. If you believe you have a food sensitivity, the best thing to do is to make an appointment with your healthcare provider or registered dietitian.

Source: https://www.eatright.org/health/allergies-and-intolerances/food-intolerances-and-sensitivities/are-food-sensitivity-tests-accurate... Read more

Energy-Boosting Nutrition Tips

As a society, we often overwork ourselves and need energy. It is very easy to get busy and stressed, which can lead to the effects of poor physical activity and eating habits. All of these things can contribute to low energy levels. Maintaining a more healthful eating pattern can be one way to boost energy. Following these five nutrition tips can be a good way to increase your energy.
Eat Regularly. One way to help fuel a healthy metabolism can be to eat every three to four hours. This can help you feel better and be more focused, while also preventing between-meal hunger that can lead to poor snacking habits and overeating at meals. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues. You should eat just enough to help curve your cravings and reduce your chances of overeating. Make sure that you only eat until you are comfortably full but not stuffed. Balance your plate. A balanced meal incorporates several different food groups. The food groups that you should balance are whole grains, lean protein, fruits, vegetables, and fat-free or low-fat dairy. Small amounts of healthy fats should also be incorporated into your meals for sustained energy. Be careful with snacks. Keep in mind that snacks are not supposed to fill you up; they should only be used to bridge you from one meal to the next. When choosing snacks, try to choose foods that have lean protein and fiber-rich carbohydrates. An apple and a handful of unsalted nuts would be a great example of this. Remove energy zappers. Try to limit beverages with added sugars, such as soda, sugary coffee, and energy drinks. These types of beverages may give you a boost of energy for about an hour, but they will likely end up causing an energy crash... Read more

Goals and Objectives

To assess and guide the AU DP, several goals and objectives have been developed.  These include the following three program goals and ten outcomes:

Program Goal 1

The AU DP will prepare, assist, and encourage program graduates to seek admittance into an ACEND accredited internship program, professional employment, graduate school or obtain professional credentialing. 

  • Objective 1.1   Over a five-year period, at least 60 percent of AU DP graduates will apply to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.
  • Objective 1.2   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of those applying to a supervised practice program in the academic year they complete the program will be accepted.
  • Objective 1.3   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of program graduates who sought employment in dietetics will be employed within 12 months of program completion.
  • Objective 1.4   Over a five-year period, at least 50 percent of AU DP graduates not going into an internship, employed or seeking employment, will report pursuing an advanced degree.
  • Objecitve 1.5   Over a five-year period, the pass rate for AU DP graduates taking the DTR examination will be greater than or equal to 80 percent. 

Program Goal 2

The AU DP will prepare graduates to become contributing members of the scientific/professional community who can function as competent entry-level dietitians in a variety of settings.

  • Objective 2.1.   Over a five-year period, the pass rate for AU DP graduates taking the registration (RD) examination for the first time will be greater than or equal to 80 percent.
  • Objective 2.2   At least 80 percent of AU DP graduates will receive satisfactory or higher ratings from supervisors/employers in at least 75 percent of the areas surveyed.

Program Goal 3

The AU DP will assist students in completing the program of study, as well as prepare and encourage students to serve the community through volunteerism, educational, and professional involvement.

  • Outcome 3.1   At least 75 percent of students enrolled in the AU DP, after completing the course DIET 210 Introduction to Dietetics, will meet the criteria for receiving a verification statement within three years; 150% of the program length. 
  • Objective 3.2   At least 75 percent of AU DP graduates will have been a member of a pre-professional or related professional organization (such as AU Student Dietetic Association, Mohican Dietetic Association, Ohio Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) prior to program completion. 
  • Objective 3.3   At least 75 percent of AU DP graduates will have completed more than 20 hours of volunteer or philanthropic activities prior to program completion.

AU DP Program outcomes data are available upon request.  Please contact the Program Director, Dr. David Vanata, RD, CSSD, LD

What to Expect in the Dietetics Program

In today’s world, more people than ever are having health-related issues that are directly related to their nutritional intake. Ashland University’s top Dietetics program will provide you with the educational knowledge to help others truly make a difference in their health. From day one in the Dietetics program, you’ll acquire a strong foundation of physical, biological, and social sciences in order to understand the social and psychological dimensions of human nutrition.

Dietetics Program Benefits

The Dietetics program at Ashland University is fully accredited by the Accreditation of Nutrition & Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (AND). This accreditation certifies our program as a highly-regarded program—which means that as a graduate, you’ll be eligible to apply for a highly competitive ACEND-accredited dietetic internship.

Other program benefits include:

  • 100% graduate pass rate on the RDN exam
  • Accent on the Individual with small class sizes and passionate faculty mentorship
  • Guaranteed career success proven by a historically high number of Dietetics students receiving a full-time job offers by graduation

There’s no better time than the present to start your path toward making lives healthier at one of Ashland University's most prestigious undergraduate programs.

About the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

 When you complete the Dietetics program at Ashland University, you’ll be awarded a B.S. degree and a Verification Statement of completion of the AU didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. (“Didactic” refers to the specific teaching method we use.) The completion of an accredited dietetic internship is required before you’re eligible to take the registration examination and obtain the Registered Dietitian (RD) credential.

Dietetics Career Outlook

Future Employment

The Dietetics program prepares you to become a practitioner in clinical, community, food industry, and other food service areas of nutrition. Registered Dietitians are employed by hospitals, community agencies, and various food service areas of nutrition.

Learn more about exams to further your career:

Average Career Salary

$59,410; with those in business and consulting earning above $87,000

Anticipated Career Growth

The average growth rate for this field is 15 percent by 2026, much faster than the average growth of other occupations

Career Opportunities

  • Hospitals
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Clinics
  • Private practice
  • Government or private organizations

Christian Services

Christian Services