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William B. Allen
William B. Allen
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
517.355.6590 / allenwi@msu.edu

Professor William B. Allen is emeritus dean and Professor of Political Philosophy in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, and 2008-09 Visiting Senior Scholar in the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the Study of Free Institutions and the Public Good at Villanova University. He also served previously on the National Council for the Humanities and as Chairman and Member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. He was recently the Ann & Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program on American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is an expert on liberal arts education, its history, importance and problems. He is also Chairman and co-founder of Toward A Fair Michigan, whose mission was to further understanding of the equal opportunity issues involved in guaranteeing civil rights for all citizens, and to provide a civic forum for a fair and open exchange of views on the question of affirmative action.

He has published extensively, most notably, George Washington: A Collection (Liberty Press). In 2008 appeared George Washington: America’s First Progressive (Peter Lang, Inc.), and The Personal and the Political: Three Fables by Montesquieu (UPA). Re-Thinking Uncle Tom: The Political Philosophy of H. B. Stowe was published later in 2008. He previously published Habits of Mind: Fostering Access and Excellence in Higher Education, with Carol M. Allen (Transaction), The Essential Antifederalist, with Gordon Lloyd (Rowman & Littlefield) and The Federalist Papers: A Commentary (Peter Lang). He served previously on the National Council for the Humanities and as chairman and member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Education

  • PhD, The Claremont Graduate School
  • MA, The Claremont Graduate School
  • BA, Pepperdine College
J. David Alvis
J. David Alvis
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
864.597.4588 / alvisjd@wofford.edu

David Alvis is Associate Professor of Political Science at Wofford College. He received his Ph.D. from Fordham University in New York in Political Science and his master's in American Studies from the University of Dallas.  At Wofford, he teaches courses on American Politics including: The American Presidency, Constitutional Law, and Political Parties.  His publications include articles on the Electoral College, Progressivism and early twentieth century politics, and the Obama Presidency.  He has also published articles on John Ford’s The Searchers and is currently completing a piece on Michelangelo’s David.  With co-authors Jeremy Bailey and Flagg Taylor, he recently published the book The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University of Kansas Press, 2013). He is also co-author, with Jason R. Jividen, of Statesmanship and Progressive Reform (Palgrave Pivot, 2013).

Education

  • PhD, Fordham University
  • MA, University of Dallas
  • BA, University of Dallas
William Atto
William Atto
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
972.721.5340 / atto@udallas.edu

William Atto is Associate Professor of History at the University of Dallas. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.  His specialties include United States history with an emphasis on nineteenth century America, as well as American political, military, and intellectual history. 

Education

  • Ph.D. - University of Arkansas
  • M.A. - University of Arkansas
  • B.A. - University of Arkansas
Jeremy D. Bailey
Jeremy D. Bailey
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
713.743.3934 / jbailey2@uh.edu

Jeremy D. Bailey, Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston, holds the Ross M. Lence Distinguished Teaching Chair and a dual appointment in Political Science and the university's Honors College. His research interests include executive power, constitutionalism, and American political thought and development.  His current book project is The Idea of Presidential Representation: An Intellectual and Political History.  His major publications include James Madison and Constitutional Imperfection (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University Press of Kansas 2013, coauthored with David Alvis and Flagg Taylor), which was named a 2014 “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice, "The New Unitary Executive and Democratic Theory," (American Political Science Review 2008) and Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007).

Bailey attended Rhodes College and received his Ph.D. from Boston College, where his dissertation was the 2004 co-winner of the APSA' s E. E. Schattschneider Prize for best dissertation in American politics. He joined the University of Houston in 2007, and, in 2014, he was awarded the University's Provost Core Teaching Excellence Award.  He is the director of the Phronesis minor in the Honors College and the co-director of the Tocqueville Forum in American Ideas and Institutions.

Education

  • Ph.D., Boston College
  • B.A., Rhodes College
Dennis K. Boman
Dennis K. Boman
Adjunct Gradaute Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / dkbhistory@yahoo.com

Dennis K. Boman is the author of Lincoln's Resolute Unionist: Hamilton Gamble, Dred Scott Dissenter and Missouri's Civil War Governor (2006) and Lincoln and Citizens’ Rights in Civil War Missouri: Balancing Freedom and Security (2011), for which he received the Missouri Humanity Council’s Distinguished Literary Achievement Award.

Education

  • PhD - University of Missouri (1998)
  • MA - University of Missouri (1992 & 1995)
Allison Brosky
Allison Brosky
Program Coordinator
801, Ashbrook Center
419.207.6094 / abrosky2@ashland.edu

Ali Brosky is the program coordinator for the Master of Arts in American History and Government. She holds a Bachelor of Arts with a double-major in history and political science from Ashland University, where she was also an Ashbrook Scholar. While an undergraduate, she interned for both the MAHG program and the Heritage Foundation in Washington, DC. 

Education

  • BA, Ashland University
Suzanne Brown
Suzanne Hunter Brown
Guest Lecturer
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / suzanne.h.brown@dartmouth.edu

Suzanne Brown recently became a Resident Scholar after teaching at Dartmouth College for over thirty-five years.  She is a writer of short stories as well as a literary critic; her articles have appeared in Modern Fiction Studies and other journals, while her stories have been published in Southern Review, Yale Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, Carolina Quarterly, Southwest Review, and other magazines. 

From 2009-2011 Brown was lead project scholar for a grant through the Maine Humanities Council to expand discussions of literature and medicine for staff in Veterans Hospitals nationwide and edited the literary anthology Echoes of War.  Since then she has worked as lead project scholar for a Maine Humanities Council grant to develop and pilot nationwide reading and discussion series for veterans themselves. As a facilitator for public discussions, she has been trained in the Civic Reflection model, including programs on immigration and the place of religion in civic life.  She also worked in programs for the National Endowment for the Humanities including Literary Reflections of Islam and Making Sense of the Civil War.

Education

  • Ph.D. - University of Pennsylvania
  • B.A. - University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Thomas Bruscino
Thomas Bruscino
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ tom.bruscino@gmail.com

Thomas Bruscino is Associate Professor of History in the Department of Military Strategy, Planning, and Operations at the United States Army War College.  He holds a Ph.D. in military history from Ohio University and has been a historian at the US Army Center of Military History in Washington, DC and the US Army Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth, and a professor at the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies. He is the author of A Nation Forged in War: How World War II Taught Americans to Get Along (University of Tennessee Press, 2010), and Out of Bounds: Transnational Sanctuary in Irregular Warfare (CSI Press, 2006), and numerous book chapters. His writings have appeared in the Claremont Review of Books, Army History, The New Criterion, Military Review, The Journal of Military History, White House Studies, War & Society, War in History, The Journal of America's Military Past, Infinity Journal, Doublethink, Reviews in American History, Joint Force Quarterly, and Parameters.

Education

  • PhD, Ohio University
Christopher Burkett
Christopher C. Burkett
Associate Professor of Political Science
825, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5686 / cburket1@ashland.edu

Christopher Burkett is Associate Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Ashbrook Scholar Program at Ashland University. He teaches undergraduate courses on American political thought, the American Founding, and American foreign policy.  He is also an instructor in the Master of Arts in American History and Government program, in which he teaches courses on the American Revolution, the American Founding, Western films and novels, and Franklin Roosevelt.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Ashland University, and received his M.A. in Politics from the University of Dallas and his Ph.D. from the Institute of Philosophic Studies, also at the University of Dallas.  He joined the History and Political Science department at Ashland University in 2005, has been selected by students as Outstanding Faculty of the Year, and won the Edward and Louaine Taylor Excellence in Teaching Award in 2011.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Dallas
  • M.A., University of Dallas
  • B.A., Ashland University
Sarah Burns
Sarah M. Burns
Adjunct Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.2064 / smburns@mail.rit.edu

Sarah M. Burns is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the Claremont Graduate University in 2013. Her research examines the intersection of political liberalization and American constitutional development with an eye toward policy implications for democratization across the globe.

Education

  • PhD - Claremont Graduate University
  • MA - Claremont Graduate University
  • BA - University of Toronto
Andrew E. Busch
Andrew E. Busch
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
909.607.3382 / andrew.busch@cmc.edu

Andrew E. Busch is Crown Professor of Government and George R. Roberts Fellow at Claremont McKenna College, where he teaches courses on American politics and government. He is the author or co-author of more than two dozen scholarly chapters and articles as well as thirteen books, including Horses in Midstream: U.S. Midterm Elections and Their Consequences, 1894-1998; Ronald Reagan and the Politics of Freedom; The Front-Loading Problem in Presidential Nominations; The Constitution on the Campaign Trail: The Surprising Political Career of America’s Founding Document; Truman’s Triumphs: The 1948 Election and the Making of Postwar America; and After Hope and Change: The 2012 Elections and American Politics.

Busch served as Associate Dean of the Faculty at CMC from 2006-2009 and in 2009-2010 was Ann and Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is currently Director of the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at CMC.

Education

  • PhD, University of Virginia
  • MA, University of Virginia
  • BA, University of Colorado
John Dinan
John Dinan
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
336.758.3495 / dinanjj@wfu.edu

John Dinan is Professor of Politics at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. His research focuses on state constitutionalism, federalism, and American political development. He is the author of several books, including The American State Constitutional Tradition and Keeping the People’s Liberties: Legislators, Citizens, and Judges as Guardians of Rights, and he writes an annual entry on state constitutional developments for The Book of the States. He is the editor of Publius: The Journal of Federalism and is a past chair of the Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations Section of the American Political Science Association. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Education

  • PhD, University of Virginia
  • MA, University of Virginia
  • BA, University of Virginia
Joshua Dunn
Joshua Dunn
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
719.255.3941 / jdunn@uccs.edu

Josuha Dunn is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Government and the Individual at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. He has research and teaching interests in public law, education policy, and political theory. His books include Complex Justice: The Case of Missouri v. Jenkins, From Schoolhouse to Courthouse: The Judiciary's Role in American Education, and Passing on the Right: Conservative Professors in the Progressive University. He also writes a quarterly article on law and education for the journal Education Next. Previously he taught at the College of William & Mary and was a fellow in contemporary history, public policy, and American politics at the Miller Center of Public Affairs in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Education

  • Ph.D. - University of Virginia
Todd Estes
Todd Estes
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
248.370.3534 / estes@oakland.edu

Todd Estes is Professor of History at Oakland University. His teaching specialty is early American history from the American Revolution through the Jacksonian era and his research concentrates on early U.S. political history and political culture. Estes is the author of the book The Jay Treaty Debate, Public Opinion, and the Evolution of Early American Political Culture (2006) in addition to the many articles and essays. Currently, he is working on a book about the debate over ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1787-1788. Estes has won several teaching prizes including the 2001 Oakland University Teaching Excellence Award. In 2009, he was named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

Education

  • PhD, University of Kentucky
  • MA, University of Kentucky
  • BA, University of Tennessee
Christopher Flannery
Christopher Flannery
Louaine S. Taylor Professor, Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
626.815.6000 / cflannery@apu.edu
Christopher Flannery is a Senior Fellow of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University, where he is also the Louaine S. Taylor Professor of American History and Government. Prior to joining Ashbrook, Professor Flannery was Professor of Political Science at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, California for more than 30 years. He has been a member of the board of directors of the The Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship and Political Philosophy since 1981 and is currently the senior editor of The Claremont Review of BooksHe is a native of Los Angeles. On evenings and weekends, he is an essayist, poet, songwriter, and spoken word artist. His first album, Even in L.A., was released July 4, 2015 (www.eveninla.com).

Education

  • PhD, Claremont Graduate School
  • MA, Claremont Graduate School
  • MA, The London School of Economics
  • BA, California State University, Northridge
Joseph R. Fornieri
Joseph R. Fornieri
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.5889 / jrfgsm@rit.edu

Joseph R. Fornieri is Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology.  He is the author of Abraham Lincoln’s Political Faith (2005), an acclaimed scholarly work that explores Lincoln’s religion and politics. He is also the author or editor of three other books on Abraham Lincoln’s political thought and statesmanship: The Language of Liberty: The Political Speeches and Writings of Abraham Lincoln (2003; revised ed. 2009); (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) Lincoln’s American Dream: Clashing Political Perspectives (2005); and (with Sara V. Gabbard) Lincoln’s America, 1809-1865 (2008). In addition, Fornieri has co-edited (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) An Invitation to Political Thought (2009), an introductory text to the classic political thinkers of the Western tradition from Plato to Nietzsche. At RIT he teaches courses on American politics, political philosophy, and constitutional rights and liberties.

Education

  • PhD, The Catholic University of America
  • MA, Boston College
  • BA, State University of New York at Geneseo
Edith Foster
Edith Foster
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ edithmfoster@gmail.com

Edith Foster holds a BA and an MA from the University of Toronto, and a PhD from the University of Chicago. She has published on Thucydides and Lucretius in the American Journal of Philology. Other articles have appeared in Humanitas and Academe. In addition, she has published book reviews in Classical PhilologyBryn Mawr Classical Reviews, and Gnomon. A monograph, Pericles and Athenian Imperialism in Thucydides, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2010, and she is the co-editor (with Donald Lateiner) of an edited volume on Thucydides and Herodotus (Thucydides and Herodotus: Connections, Divergences, and Reception), under consideration with Oxford University Press.

Education

  • PhD - University of Chicago
  • MA - University of Toronto
  • BA - University of Toronto
David Foster
David Foster
Professor of Political Science, MAHG & MASTAHG Academic Advisor
122, Andrews Hall
419.289.5626 / dfoster2@ashland.edu

David Foster is Professor of Political Science and chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Ashland University. He teaches undergraduate courses in political philosophy and international relations and graduate courses on Alexis de Tocqueville, the political thought of Mark Twain, and the Federalist Papers. He has published on John Locke, liberal education, and Mark Twain.

Education

  • PhD, University of Toronto
  • MA, University of Toronto
  • BA, McMaster University
Jay D. Green
Jay D. Green
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
706.419.1654 / jay.green@covenant.edu

Jay D. Green is Professor of History at Covenant College in Lookout Mountain, Georgia, where he has been on the faculty since 1998.

Education

  • PhD, Kent State University
  • MA, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
  • BA,Taylor University
David Hadley
David Hadley
Visiting Assistant Professor of History
128, Andrews Hall
419.207.4934 / dhadley@ashland.edu
  • Joined the Ashland University faculty in 2018, serving as Visting Assistant Professor of History
  • Previously served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Gettysburg College and as an instructor at Towson University and George Mason University
  • Field of expertise is modern U.S. history, with a specific focus on the history of U.S. diplomacy and the history of intelligence and espionage in the Cold War era
  • His first book, an examination of the relationships that developed between the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the American press in the early Cold War, is due to be published by the University Press of Kentucky in 2019

Education

  • PhD, The Ohio State University
  • MA, The Ohio State University
  • BA, Gettysburg College

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