David Alvis
J. David Alvis
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
864.597.4588 / alvisjd@wofford.edu

David Alvis is Associate Professor of Political Science at Wofford College. He received his Ph.D. from Fordham University in New York in Political Science and his master's in American Studies from the University of Dallas.  At Wofford, he teaches courses on American Politics including: The American Presidency, Constitutional Law, and Political Parties.  His publications include articles on the Electoral College, Progressivism and early twentieth century politics, and the Obama Presidency.  He has also published articles on John Ford’s The Searchers and is currently completing a piece on Michelangelo’s David.  With co-authors Jeremy Bailey and Flagg Taylor, he recently published the book The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University of Kansas Press, 2013). He is also co-author, with Jason R. Jividen, of Statesmanship and Progressive Reform (Palgrave Pivot, 2013).

Education

  • PhD, Fordham University
  • MA, University of Dallas
  • BA, University of Dallas
Elizabeth Amato
Elizabeth Amato
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
704.406.4466 / eamato@gardner-webb.edu

Dr. Elizabeth Amato is Associate Professor of Political Science for the Department of Social Science at Gardner-Webb University. Her teaching responsibilities include courses connected with American politics and political theory such as Constitutional Law, Presidency & Congress, American Political Parties, American Politics, and Modern Political Philosophy. She contributed a chapter to A Political Companion to Walker Percy and has published an article on Tom Wolfe’s novels in Perspective on Political Science.

Dr. Amato is the faculty adviser for the Pre-Law Society, a club that helps students explore and prepare for a career in law.

Dr. Amato earned her B.A. at Berry College (Rome, GA), her M.A. and Ph. D. at Baylor University (Waco, TX) in political science. The title of her dissertation is The Pursuit of Happiness and the American Regime, which takes a politics and literature approach to understanding the pursuit of happiness. Before coming to Gardner-Webb University, she taught at James Madison College at Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI).

Dr. Amato’s scholarly interests include the study of happiness, ancient and modern political thought (particularly, Aristotle, Thucydides, Machiavelli, Locke, and Nietzsche), politics, literature and film, American political thought, the American presidency, constitutional law (particularly, executive detention cases, the Taft Court, and 14th Amendment Due Process cases), and political revolutions. Her non-academic past times include drinking coffee, making frequent references to Plato and Aristotle in conversation, watching action films especially from the 1980s, the study of ancient warfare, baking and candy-making, reading children’s books, watching cartoons, growing herbs and container gardening, packing bento boxes, feeling smug for using reusable bags, feeling guilty for not composting more, running, finding new ways to add jalapenos and serrano peppers to food, and reading poetry on Sundays.

Education

  • PhD, Baylor University
  • MA, Baylor University
  • BA, Berry College
William Atto
William Atto
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
972.721.5340 / atto@udallas.edu

William Atto is Associate Professor of History at the University of Dallas. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.  His specialties include United States history with an emphasis on nineteenth century America, as well as American political, military, and intellectual history. 

Education

  • PhD, University of Arkansas
  • MA, University of Arkansas
  • BA, University of Arkansas
Jeremy D. Bailey
Jeremy D. Bailey
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
405.325.0490 / jdb@ou.edu

Jeremy D. Bailey is a professor in the Department of Classics and Letters at the University of Oklahoma, where he holds the Sanders Chair in Law and Liberty and is the Director of the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage. He teaches in the Constitutional Studies program, and his research interests include the political thought of the early republic as well as constitutional controversies concerning executive power.  His books include The Idea of Presidential Representation: An Intellectual and Political History (University Press of Kansas, 2019), James Madison and Constitutional Imperfection (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University Press of Kansas 2013, coauthored with David Alvis and Flagg Taylor), which was named a 2014 “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice, and Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007). His articles have appeared in American Political Science ReviewHistory of Political ThoughtReview of PoliticsPolitical Research QuarterlyAmerican Politics ResearchHarvard Journal of Law and Public PolicyPubliusPresidential Studies Quarterly, and Critical Review. With Susan McWilliams, Bailey is editor of American Political Thought: A Journal of Ideas, Institutions, and Culture, published quarterly by University of Chicago Press, as well as the American Political Thought book series published by University Press of Kansas.

Bailey attended Rhodes College and received his Ph.D. from Boston College, where his dissertation was the 2004 co-winner of the American Political Science Association's E. E. Schattschneider Prize for best dissertation in American politics.

Education

  • PhD, Boston College
  • BA, Rhodes College
Dennis K. Boman
Dennis K. Boman
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / dkbhistory@yahoo.com

Dennis K. Boman is the author of Lincoln's Resolute Unionist: Hamilton Gamble, Dred Scott Dissenter and Missouri's Civil War Governor (2006) and Lincoln and Citizens’ Rights in Civil War Missouri: Balancing Freedom and Security (2011), for which he received the Missouri Humanity Council’s Distinguished Literary Achievement Award.

Education

  • PhD, University of Missouri
  • MA, University of Missouri
Suzanne Brown
Suzanne Hunter Brown
Guest Lecturer
801, Ashbrook Center
419.289.5411 / suzanne.h.brown@dartmouth.edu

Suzanne Brown recently became a Resident Scholar after teaching at Dartmouth College for over thirty-five years.  She is a writer of short stories as well as a literary critic; her articles have appeared in Modern Fiction Studies and other journals, while her stories have been published in Southern Review, Yale Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, Carolina Quarterly, Southwest Review, and other magazines. 

From 2009-2011 Brown was lead project scholar for a grant through the Maine Humanities Council to expand discussions of literature and medicine for staff in Veterans Hospitals nationwide and edited the literary anthology Echoes of War.  Since then she has worked as lead project scholar for a Maine Humanities Council grant to develop and pilot nationwide reading and discussion series for veterans themselves. As a facilitator for public discussions, she has been trained in the Civic Reflection model, including programs on immigration and the place of religion in civic life.  She also worked in programs for the National Endowment for the Humanities including Literary Reflections of Islam and Making Sense of the Civil War.

Education

  • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • BA, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Christopher Burkett
Christopher C. Burkett
Associate Professor of Political Science, Co-Director, Ashbrook Scholar Program
129, Andrews Hall
419.289.5686 / cburket1@ashland.edu

Christopher Burkett is Associate Professor of Political Science, acting Chair of the Department of History and Political Science, and co-director of the Ashbrook Scholar Program at Ashland University. He teaches undergraduate courses on American political thought, the American Founding, and American foreign policy.  He is also an instructor in the Master of Arts in American History and Government program, in which he teaches courses on the American Revolution, the American Founding, Western films and novels, and Franklin Roosevelt.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Ashland University, received his M.A. in Politics from the University of Dallas and his Ph.D. from the Institute of Philosophic Studies, also at the University of Dallas.  He joined the History and Political Science department at Ashland University in 2005, has been selected by students as Outstanding Male Faculty of the Year, and won the Edward and Louaine Taylor Excellence in Teaching Award in 2011.

Education

  • PhD, University of Dallas
  • MA, University of Dallas
  • BA, Ashland University
Sarah Burns
Sarah M. Burns
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.2064 / smburns@mail.rit.edu

Sarah M. Burns is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the Claremont Graduate University in 2013. Her research examines the intersection of political liberalization and American constitutional development with an eye toward policy implications for democratization across the globe.

Education

  • PhD, Claremont Graduate University
  • MA, Claremont Graduate University
  • BA, University of Toronto
Vincent Cannato
Vincent J. Cannato
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
617.287.6863 / vincent.cannato@umb.edu

Vincent J. Cannato is Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he teaches courses on New York City history, Boston history, immigration history, and twentieth-century American history.

He is the author of American Passage: The History of Ellis Island (HarperCollins, 2009); The Ungovernable City: John Lindsay and his Struggle to Save New York (Basic Books, 2001); and co-editor of Living in the Eighties (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Prof. Cannato has written for numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, New York Post, New York Daily News, National Affairs, Politico, Humanities Magazine, The Weekly Standard, and The New Republic. He has also received a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Apart from his academic career, Prof. Cannato was also managing editor of The Public Interest, co-edited by Irving Kristol and Nathan Glazer; co-producer of the PBS documentary “The First Measured Century”; an aide to former Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler; and a speechwriter at the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

He received his PhD in History from Columbia University and his BA with Honors in Political Science from Williams College. He lives with his family in Framingham, MA.

Education

  • PhD, Columbia University
  • BA, Williams College
Adam Carrington
Adam M. Carrington
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ acarrington@hillsdale.edu

Adam M. Carrington is Associate Professor of Politics in The Van Andel Graduate School of Statesmanship at Hillsdale College. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Baylor University and a BA in Politics and Religion from Ashland University, where he was an Ashbrook Scholar.

Education

  • PhD, Baylor University
  • MA, Baylor University
  • BA, Ashland University
Joshua Dunn
Joshua Dunn
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
719.255.3941 / jdunn@uccs.edu

Josuha Dunn is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Government and the Individual at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. He has research and teaching interests in public law, education policy, and political theory. His books include Complex Justice: The Case of Missouri v. Jenkins, From Schoolhouse to Courthouse: The Judiciary's Role in American Education, and Passing on the Right: Conservative Professors in the Progressive University. He also writes a quarterly article on law and education for the journal Education Next. Previously he taught at the College of William & Mary and was a fellow in contemporary history, public policy, and American politics at the Miller Center of Public Affairs in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Education

  • PhD, University of Virginia
Todd Estes
Todd Estes
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
248.370.3534 / estes@oakland.edu

Todd Estes is Professor of History at Oakland University. His teaching specialty is early American history from the American Revolution through the Jacksonian era and his research concentrates on early U.S. political history and political culture. Estes is the author of the book The Jay Treaty Debate, Public Opinion, and the Evolution of Early American Political Culture (2006) in addition to the many articles and essays. Currently, he is working on a book about the debate over ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1787-1788. Estes has won several teaching prizes including the 2001 Oakland University Teaching Excellence Award. In 2009, he was named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

Education

  • PhD, University of Kentucky
  • MA, University of Kentucky
  • BA, University of Tennessee
Joseph R. Fornieri
Joseph R. Fornieri
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.5889 / jrfgsm@rit.edu

Joseph R. Fornieri is Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology.  He is the author of Abraham Lincoln’s Political Faith (2005), an acclaimed scholarly work that explores Lincoln’s religion and politics. He is also the author or editor of three other books on Abraham Lincoln’s political thought and statesmanship: The Language of Liberty: The Political Speeches and Writings of Abraham Lincoln (2003; revised ed. 2009); (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) Lincoln’s American Dream: Clashing Political Perspectives (2005); and (with Sara V. Gabbard) Lincoln’s America, 1809-1865 (2008). In addition, Fornieri has co-edited (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) An Invitation to Political Thought (2009), an introductory text to the classic political thinkers of the Western tradition from Plato to Nietzsche. At RIT he teaches courses on American politics, political philosophy, and constitutional rights and liberties.

Education

  • PhD, The Catholic University of America
  • MA, Boston College
  • BA, State University of New York at Geneseo
David Foster
David Foster
Professor of Political Science, MAHG & MASTAHG Academic Advisor
122, Andrews Hall
419.289.5626 / dfoster2@ashland.edu

David Foster is Professor of Political Science and chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Ashland University. He teaches undergraduate courses in political philosophy and international relations and graduate courses on Alexis de Tocqueville, the political thought of Mark Twain, and the Federalist Papers. He has published on John Locke, liberal education, and Mark Twain.

Education

  • PhD, University of Toronto
  • MA, University of Toronto
  • BA, McMaster University
Jay D. Green
Jay D. Green
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
706.419.1654 / jay.green@covenant.edu

Jay D. Green is Professor of History at Covenant College in Lookout Mountain, Georgia, where he has been on the faculty since 1998.

Education

  • PhD, Kent State University
  • MA, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
  • BA,Taylor University
David Hadley
David Hadley
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
/ dhadley@ashland.edu

David Hadley is Assistant Professor of History in the Joint Special Operations Master of Arts (JSOMA) program at National Defense University at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. His research focuses on the intersection of national security and culture, especially focused on the ways in which media coverage and competing cultural and political narratives impact the security environment. His dissertation, later expanded into his first book, The Rising Clamor: The American Press, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Cold War (University Press of Kentucky, 2019), examined the relationships that developed between the Central Intelligence Agency and the U.S. print media during the early decades of the CIA’s existence, and the impact of those relationships on the evolution of the CIA and the U.S. public’s understanding of intelligence activity. He is currently researching the evolution of Congressional oversight of intelligence and special operations.

David received his doctoral degree in history from the Ohio State University, and for the past three years has been a visiting assistant professor at Ashland University. He has also been active in the Ashbrook Center, taking part in educational initiatives designed to strengthen the teaching of American history. 

Education

  • PhD, The Ohio State University
  • MA, The Ohio State University
  • BA, Gettysburg College
Lauren Hall
Lauren K. Hall
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
585.475.6827 / lxhgpt@rit.edu

Lauren Hall is Associate Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Rochester Institute of Technology. Her recent book, Family and the Politics of Moderation, was published by Baylor University Press in April 2014. She has also edited a volume on the political philosophy of French political thinker, Chantal Delsol. She has written extensively on the classical liberal tradition, including articles on Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Montesquieu.  She serves on the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal Cosmos+Taxis, which publishes on spontaneous orders in the social and political worlds. She serves as the faculty advisor for the RIT College Libertarians. Her current research is on the politics of women and the family in classical liberalism, and she also writes on related areas in evolutionary theory and bioethics.

Education

  • PhD, Northern Illinois University
  • MA, Northern Illinois University
  • BA, Binghamton University
Jason Jividen
Jason Jividen
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
724.805.2825 / jason.jividen@stvincent.edu

Dr. Jividen is Associate Professor of Politics in the McKenna School of Business, Economics, and Government at Saint Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he also serves as Fellow in Civic and Constitutional Affairs for the Center for Political and Economic Thought, and Director of the Aurelius Scholars Program in Western Civilization. Since coming to SVC in 2010, Dr. Jividen has taught several courses in the Politics Department, including Principles of American Politics, American Political Thought, Constitutional Law, Classical Political Thought, and Institutions. In 2013, he was awarded SVC’s annual Quentin Schaut Faculty Award, which recognizes the contributions, leadership, and achievements of a junior faculty member to the curriculum and life of the college.

Dr. Jividen has delivered numerous invited lectures and conference papers on topics in ancient and modern political philosophy, the principles of the American Founding, Lincoln’s political thought, American Progressivism, and civic education. His recent peer-reviewed publications include: Claiming Lincoln: Progressivism, Equality, and the Battle for Lincoln’s Legacy in Presidential Rhetoric. Northern Illinois University Press, 2011; Statesmanship and Progressive Reform: An Assessment of Herbert Croly’s Abraham Lincoln (with J. David Alvis). Palgrave Macmillan, 2013; “American Democracy and Liberal Education in an Era of Relevance,” in Higher Education in an Era of Relevance, ed. Timothy L. Simpson. Lexington Books, 2013; “Presidential Statesmanship as Civic Education,” Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities (forthcoming, Fall 2014); “Equality, Leadership, and the Lincoln Image in American Presidential Rhetoric,” in Lincoln, Leadership, and the Law, ed. Charles Hubbard. Southern Illinois University Press (forthcoming 2015); “American Progressivism and the Legacy of Abraham Lincoln” (with Ronald J. Pestritto) in Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages, ed. Lucas Morel. University Press of Kentucky (forthcoming 2015).

Education

  • PhD, University of Northern Illinois
  • MA, Marshall University
  • BA, Marshall Unviersity
Jennifer Keene
Jennifer D. Keene
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
714.744.2102 / keene@chapman.edu

Jennifer D. Keene is Professor of History and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Carnegie-Mellon University and is a specialist in American military experience during World War I.  She received the Wang-Franklin Professorship for 2007-09, the highest faculty award given by Chapman University. Dr. Keene has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War, Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), The United States and the First World War (2000), and World War I ( 2006). She is also the lead author for an America history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States. She is currently working on a book detailing the African American experience during the First World War and has another project comparing the experiences of soldiers from the French and British empires during World War I. Dr. Keene served as an associate editor for the Encyclopedia of War and American Society (2005) which won the Society of Military History's prize for best military history reference book. She is on the advisory board of the International Society for First World War Studies and serves as the book review editor for the Journal of First World War Studies.

She has received numerous fellowships for her research, including a Mellon Fellowship, a Graves Award, Fulbright Senior Scholar Award to Australia and France, an Albert J. Beveridge Research Grant, and a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Award.  Dr. Keene's articles have appeared in the Organization of American Historians Magazine of HistoryAnnales de Démographie Historique, Peace & Change, Intelligence and National Security, and Military Psychology. She has published essays in several edited anthologies, including Warfare and Belligerence: New Perspectives on the First World War, National Stereotypes in Perspective: Frenchmen in America: Americans in France, and Knowing Your Friends: Intelligence Inside Alliances and Coalitions from 1914 to the Cold War. In addition, Dr. Keene has served as an on-camera expert for several film documentaries including "The March of the Bonus Army," that aired on PBS nationwide on Memorial Day 2006 and has appeared on the Chicago Public Radio Program, Odyssey. She also works closely with the Gilder-Lehrman Institute offering Teaching American History workshops for secondary school teachers throughout the country. Prior to joining the faculty of Chapman University in 2004, Dr. Keene taught at the University of Redlands.

Education

  • PhD, Carnegie-Mellon University
  • MA, The George Washington University
  • BA, The George Washington University
Sarah Beth Kitch
Sarah Beth V. Kitch
Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty
801, Ashbrook Center
815.753.1011 / sbkitch@niu.edu

Sarah Beth V. Kitch is Assistant Professor of Public Affairs at the Truman School of Public Affairs and Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy at the Kinder Institute at the University of Missouri.  She received her Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 2014 and recently completed an appointment as the 2016-17 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in Religion and Public Life in the Department of Politics at Princeton University.  Her scholarly interests center on American democracy at the intersection of race and citizenship, having published articles in the American Journal of Political Science (2016) and the Journal of Church and State (2015).

Her research focuses on sources of action.  Her current work examines Martin Luther King, Jr.’s political theology and how King's participation in the prophetic tradition shapes his politics.  In addition, she is developing a study of C.S. Lewis's theory of poetic imagination and its significance for politics, based on research conducted for her dissertation, “Accountable Actors: Politics and Poetic Imagination in Huxley, Lewis, and Orwell.”

Education

  • PhD, Louisiana State University
  • MA, Louisiana State University
  • BA, Southeastern Louisiana University

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