Finding Core Courses

Finding Core Courses

For complete descriptions of courses please see the Course Catalog

Aesthetics

Core courses in aesthetics focus on the application or development of levels of expressive or technical skill in artistic production or aesthetic inquiry.

Primary departments: ArtMusicTheatre,

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

ART 130 ELEMENTS OF DESIGN

Prerequisite: Note: not open to students who have taken ART*134 or ART*135

A fundamental study of two-dimensional application of visual elements and principles of design. Students will explore composition through line, shape, value, texture, and color, and will be introduced to and use various materials and design techniques. For non-art majors.

ART 140 FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING (NON MAJORS)

Prerequisite: Note: not open to students who have taken ART*141

This fundamental course provides a variety of approaches to improve individual skills in drawing. Attention to line, shape, value, texture, and perspective are used to develop an understanding of what we see in relation to how we represent them visually. For non-art majors.

ART 150 ART & IDEAS

PrerequisiteNote: not open to students who have taken ART*256 or ART*257

A combined visual and thematic introduction to Western art. The form and content of painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphics will be studied through a series of themes and purposes.Students will investigate the interplay of form and meaning of art objects from multiple eras through such themes as death and the macabre, entertainment, power and politics, religious beliefs, and landscape and the environment. The course introduces many of the issues associated with the visual arts including iconoclasm, restoration, aesthetic quarrels, and questions of cultural property.

ART 160 FUNDAMENTALS OF STUDIO ART

160A CERAMICS; 160B PAINTING; 160C PRINTMAKING; 160D SCULPTURE; 160E DIGITAL ART

Prerequisite: None

This course is an exploration of the processes and philosophies of various studio art disciplines. This course is designed for non-art majors to fulfill institutional core requirements in aesthetics, and is not open to students who have taken ART 211, 261, 271, or 281 respectively. Students may take two different topics to fulfill Core aesthetics requirements, but they may not repeat the same topic for credit.

ART 161 FUNDAMENTALS OF STUDIO ART II

160A CERAMICS; 160B PAINTING; 160C PRINTMAKING; 160D SCULPTURE

Prerequisite: ART 160 in the appropriate studio area

This course is a continuation of the introduction to the aesthetic processes and philosophies of various studio art disciplines developed in ART 160. By studying more advanced problems in traditional studio topics (Ceramics, Painting, Printmaking, or Sculpture), students will become acquainted with the wide range of options, and the decisions necessary, of studio artists. The course delves more deeply into the visual art aesthetic, studio processes, and the general history of the relevant discipline.

ART 204 PHOTOGRAPHY

Prerequisite: None

A course dealing with the process and principles of digital photography. Technical and aesthetic considerations will be explored. Adobe Photoshop will be the software used in this class and students are expected to provide their own digital camera.

ART 205 SEQUENCING IN ART

Prerequisite: ART 204

This course explores how groups of images called sequences are used in art. This is done through the study of filmmakers and fine artists who have focused on the use of sequence in their own work. The lecture component of this class is balanced by studio practice, during which students learn to convey conceptual meaning and aesthetic relationships through specific image arrangements in digital video and photographic mediums.

MUSIC 010A UNIVERSITY MARCHING BAND  

1 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: None

Marching Band meets in the fall semester only. Membership is open to students from all majors. The band appears at all home football games, selected campus and community events, and a selected away game or marching exhibition. The ability to play a wind or percussion instrument or ability to be part of the auxiliary units (color guard or feature twirler) is a prerequisite. Auxiliary members must audition. Major ensemble. No audition is required.

MUSIC 010B-C UNIVERSITY SYMPHONIC BAND

.5-1 Credit Hour   Prerequisite: Audition

Symphonic Band meets in the late fall semester and in the spring semester. Membership is open to students of all majors. This ensemble stresses a high level of artistry and membership and is intended to be an active medium for the study and performance of fine literature for the modern band. For music majors, it also provides the opportunity to observe rehearsal techniques and to reinforce and synthesize other aspects of their musical study. The ability to play a wind or percussion instrument is a prerequisite. Major ensemble.

MUSIC 011 BRASS ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform brass chamber music.

MUSIC 012 WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour  Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform woodwind chamber music.

MUSIC 013 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice, and perform percussion ensemble music.

MUSIC 014 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 

1 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will sight read, rehearse and perform jazz music in the big band idiom at their highest potential. In addition to campus performances, there will be concerts and tours off campus.

MUSIC 015 JAZZ COMBO 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will interact spontaneously with one another, improvise at high levels, learn the standard combo literature and create new arrangements and compositions.

MUSIC 017 STRING ENSAMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will study, practice and perform ensemble music for orchestral string instruments.

MUSIC 020 WOMEN'S CHORUS  

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Promotes healthy vocalization, musical literacy and artistic development through choral music for treble voices.

MUSIC 022 UNIVERSITY CHOIR

1 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform music suitable for the choral medium to a high degree of artistic excellence. Major ensemble.

MUSIC 030 CHAMBER SINGERS 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform music suitable for vocal chamber ensembles to a high degree of artistic excellence. In the fall semester, the focus is usually on a traditional Renaissance Madrigal Feaste.

MUSIC 031 OPERA WORKSHOP 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

Students will rehearse, learn, and perform operatic literature resulting in a staged and costumed production at the end of the semester.

MUSIC 050 SPECIAL ENSEMBLE 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: Audition

The preparation and performance of music composed for a particular combination of resources not covered by other ensembles.

MUSIC 051 ASHLAND AREA COMMUNITY CONCERT BAND

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: None

This band is intended for both university students and members of the Ashland community to continue their musical study, creative activity and aesthetic enrichment. It meets one evening per week in both fall and spring semesters. The band performs once in the fall semester and several times in the spring. It performs a wide variety of literature from Broadway selections and classic marches to masterworks transcribed or written for concert band. The ability to play a wind or percussion instrument is a prerequisite. No audition is required

MUSIC 052 ASHLAND AREA CHORUS 

.5 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: None

A mixed chorus that allows students to rehearse, learn, and perform choral music to a high degree of artistic excellence. This chorus sings regularly with the Ashland Symphony Orchestra. No Audition is required.

MUSIC 120s, 140s, 240s, 330s, 340s, 440s, 450s PRIVATE LESSONS

1 Credit Hour    Prerequisite: None

Weekly individual and group lessons. Content inclludes the study of standard repertoire for the instrument or voice comprising but not limited to solo classical repertoire. Emphasis is placed on use of listening skills, development of proper technique, and productive practice. Outside practice is essential. 

MUSIC 130 BASIC GUITAR MUSICIANSHIP

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to musical skills and concepts taught primarily through study of the guitar. Topics include music reading and notation, performance skills, and listening.

MUSIC 150 PRINCIPLES OF MUSIC MAKING

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to musical skills and concepts including notation, piano, treble recorder, and singing. 

MUSIC 225 MUSICAL STYLE

Prerequisite: None

Course will examine the fundamental question of what distinguishes different styles of music. Selected examples from classical, folk, and popular music's will be studied.

MUSIC 226 MUSIC IN WORLD CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

There is no culture in the world that does not have music. Music can therefore help foster cross-cultural connections. In this course, we journey around the world, exploring the music of various non-Western and folk cultures. We explore the sound of this music, the setting in which it takes place, and the significance it holds for each culture. In the process, we not only broaden our enjoyment and understanding of a wide variety of music, but also deepen cross-cultural understanding through our shared use of music.

MUSIC 250 TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION

2 Credit Hour     Prerequisite: None

An introductory course for non-music majors dealing with various single topics in music appreciation. For the specific topic offered, consult the course schedule. Topics may include Jazz, World Musics, American Musical Theatre, Understanding Opera, American Music, or 20th Century Music.

MUSIC 251 LOVE SONGS

3 Credit Hour     Prerequisite: None

Musicians from a wide variety of time periods and styles have composed songs about love. This course will explore selected love songs from Western culture, from medieval troubadour ballads to current show and pop tunes. Emphasis will be on understanding how artists have used music to express texts about love and how musical expressions of love have changed over time.

MUSIC 252 TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION: MUSIC AND DRAMA ACROSS CULTURES

Prerequisite: None

What does music add to drama? Why have so many cultures found it effective? Which uses of music in drama are universal? This course examines the interaction of music and drama in a variety of cultural traditions, from ancient Chinese opera to the latest Hollywood blockbuster.

MUSIC 253 LISTENING TO JAZZ

Prerequisite: None

Jazz music is a significant art form created in the United States that relies on improvisation and re-interpretation of existing songs and previous performances. What are the components of a jazz performance? How have selected major jazz artists used diverse influences to create their unique musical style? Students will not only understand the basic parameters of what makes music jazz, but will understand how specific jazz artists continually reinvented jazz through the 20th and 21st centuries.

MUSIC 381 MUSIC HISTORY SEMINAR II

Prerequisite: MUSIC 150 or MUSIC 259 or MUSIC 260

This seminar focuses on global, popular and avant-garde music. A small number of focused topics will be chosen to explore, and students will learn about the major styles, genres, composers, and performers of these musics, as well as the function of these musics in their society.

TH 203 THEATRE AESTHETICS

Prerequisite: None

Students will examine ways in which theatre art and theatre artists suggest meaning and invite interpretation of the human experience. Critical standards and theories specific to theatre will be discussed and then applied to the study of selected play scripts and performances.

TH 204 SCRIPT ANALYSIS

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to methods of script analysis or how to read a play. Analysis will focus on dramatic structure, content and meaning from a theatrical point of view and will be based on principles established by Aristotle in the Poetics. Methods of script analysis will be discussed and applied to representative play scripts.

TH 207 THE VISUAL ART OF THEATRE

Prerequisite: None

The course offers the opportunity to learn, develop and practice the art of set, costume and lighting design. Students are required to critically analyze all visual and other sensory aspects of a live production.

TH 214 ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS

Prerequisite: None

This course is a study of acting as an art form. It emphasizes an acting process and skills utilized by the beginning actor.

TH 303 AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE

Prerequisite: None

This course is an exploration of the development of the Broadway musical during the twentieth century. Representative musicals will be examined in terms of style, elements, and structure in order to identify criteria for aesthetic evaluation.

Communications

Core courses in communications focus on understanding the transactional nature of oral communication in its relation to audiences of one or many. Some group and several short speeches are usually part of the course.

Primary Department: Communication Studies

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

COM 101 HUMAN COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite: None

This course encompasses communication theory, interpersonal communication, small group common- citation and public speaking. Emphasis is placed on speaking, critical thinking, listening skills. Attention is also paid to nonverbal communication.

COM 120 HEALTH COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite: None

This course encompasses communication theory, interpersonal communication, small group and team communication and public speaking specific to the healthcare setting. Emphasis is placed on speaking, critical thinking, listening, and feedback skills. Attention is also paid to non-verbal communication.

Composition

Composition courses demonstrate a fundamental commitment to the writing process consistent with the objectives and outcomes as Composition I and Composition II courses offered in the English department, and for which there will be a portfolio assessment process.

Primary Department: English

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

ENG 101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

Prerequisite: ENG 100 if required by placement

This course stresses the development of effective grammatical and rhetorical form through the assignment of expository and argumentative writing projects. Students will learn to reflect on ideas and observations, to use writing as a tool to sharpen those ideas, to reflect on their own writing process, and to use and cite sources accurately. May not be taken for S/U credit.

ENG 101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II

Prerequisite: ENG 101

English 102 is the second course in Ashland University's two-semester writing sequence and involves continued emphasis on the writing process, critical thinking, close reading, the rhetorical nature of language, and research skills. The course requires frequent writing and may not be taken for S/U credit.

Historical Reasoning

Historical Reasoning courses embody the application of rational inquiry to past events or periods. Courses usually employ primary sources to examine and attempt to account for change and persistence in human events over time, not in one particular sphere of life but in human life more generally across a variety of disciplines.

Primary departments: History/Political Science

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

HIST 112 WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

This course will seek to answer the question What is civilization? Through the study of certain historical moments in the West-classical Greece, the Roman Republic, early Christianity, the High Middle Ages, and the Renaissance-this class examines the changes over time in politics, religion, society, economics, and culture and to realize the extent to which the present world has inherited these institutional and intellectual foundations of human life. 

HIST 113 WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

This course examines how the peoples of Western Europe understood freedom and sought to secure it in the 500 years from the Renaissance to WW II.  Focusing on selected historical moments during this period, the course considers how this quest for freedom transformed politics, religion, economics, and morality; it also examines the reaction to this transformation, especially in totalitarianism.

HIST 212 AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH THE CIVIL WAR

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the creation and development of a distinctively American civilization, from its origins through the Civil War (to 1865). 

HIST 213 AMERICAN HISTORY AFTER THE CIVIL WAR

Prerequisite: None

An examination of how the fundamental American principles of freedom and equality have developed as the United States emerged as the world's leading power from the Civil War to the present. 

Humanities

Core Humanities courses involve the application of uniquely literary and interpretive modes of inquiry with regard to the study of written and spoken languages, literatures, and to the traditions of interpretation, theory and criticism of religious, philosophical, and textual ideas.

Primary departments: EnglishReligionPhilosophyForeign Languages

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

CHEM 350 SCIENCE AS A CULTURAL FORCE

A – THE MAKING OF THE BOMB

B – THE TOBACCO WARS

C – SCIENCE AND HUMAN NATURE

D – EVOLUTION: FOR & AGAINST

E – SCIENCE AND RATIONALITY

Prerequisite: Any natural science core course

An inquiry into the nature of the scientific method in relation to human culture and its use in gaining and applying new knowledge. This course constitutes a substantial interdisciplinary investigation of the impact of science and technology upon society by way of a sustained look at one particular scientific issue or question for the semester. The ethical dimensions of advances in science and technology are explored in detail. Meets Core credit for humanities or natural sciences, but not both. May be taken only once for Core credit. CHEM/ GEOL/PHYS/PHIL credit.

ENG 203 AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course focuses on a specific problem or question in American society from the colonial period to the present. Possible areas of focus might include Race and Slavery; Nature and the Environment; Freedom, Democracy, and the Individual; Immigration and Nativism; Gender in America; or America at War.

ENG 210 BIBLE AS LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

The course involves a sustained study of representative Biblical texts using the tools of literary analysis and approaches the Bible as literature from a social, historical, and literary perspective.

ENG 217 BRITISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course involves a sustained study of selected texts of British literature and emphasizes literary content as statement of moral and philosophic attitudes in British writers.

ENG 304 SHORT STORY

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course is an intensive study of the short story as a literary genre with particular attention to narrative construction and to literary techniques.

ENG 308 THE POEM

Prerequisite: Eng 102

The course focuses on poetry and poetics.

ENG 309 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course closely examines representative works by African American writers, ranging from early slave narratives to contemporary prose, poetry, and drama.

ENG 314 WOMEN'S LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course focuses on literature that centrally engages issues of gender, including but not limited to masculinity, femininity, patriarchy, biological vs. socially constructed notions of sex and gender, and intersections between gender and other factors-including race, class, religion, and sexuality-in shaping human experience

ENG 315 GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course involves reading and discussion of a number of major writings in German literature. Students will read short stories, novels, poetry, and non-fiction. Some of the themes include the conflict between artistic and bourgeois values, class and ethnic conflict, legal issues, aesthetic concerns, and contemporary cultural movements.

ENG 316 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course focuses on literatures shaped by colonialism and imperialism. The course emphasizes in-depth study of colonial and postcolonial literature supported by an understanding of the historical, social, cultural, and political contexts of that literature

ENG 317 STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

Students will read examples of Shakespearean histories, comedies, romances, and tragedies, exploring language and dramatic technique to develop an understanding of the structure and themes.

ENG 319 MODERN DRAMA

Prerequisite:  Eng 102

This course studies European and American drama from the late 1800s to the present. 

ENG 322 MODERN POETRY

Prerequisite:  Eng 102

This course focuses on close reading of selected modern poems and discusses the ways in which modern poetry differs from earlier work in English

ENG 324 MODERN NOVEL

Prerequisite:  Eng 102

This course analyzes the modern novel as art form and as social document. Representative novels in English and/or English translation will be examined to explore a central question: How is the modern novel a reaction to the problems and issues of modernity? 

ENG 330 AFRICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite:  Eng 102

This course emphasizes the study of literature produced on the African continent during the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods. Primary texts will be supplemented by critical, cultural, and historical materials related to Africa. The course traces the themes of African nationalism and post-colonialism as dramatized in the works of major African authors. 

ENG 333 AMERICAN STUDIES - 19TH CENTURY

Prerequisite:  Eng 102

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion and/or culture from the 19th century, this course focuses on how literature captures the American spirit.

ENG 334 AMERICAN STUDIES - 20TH CENTURY

Prerequisite: Eng 102

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion and/or culture from the 20th century, this course focuses on how literature captures the American spirit. 

ENG 338 THEMES AND TOPICS IN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course explores a major idea or theme through a wide range of literary and related texts. Typically, the seminar will focus on a particular historical, social, or artistic idea.

ENG 340 READINGS IN JEWISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course involves reading and discussion of a number of major works of in Jewish literature. Students will read short stories, novels, and a memoir; some themes include religious faith, silence, the father-son relationship, gender issues, grief, wisdom, and folly. 

ENG 350 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN STUDIES

Prerequisite: Eng 102

An examination of a particular topic of American literature, history, religion, and/or culture from contemporary life, this course considers a body of literature, generally published within the previous twenty years, about which historical conclusions are still largely unformed. 

ENG 360 LITERATURE OF CRIME AND RETRIBUTION

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course emphasizes close analysis of literature on themes including evil, faith, insanity, racism, and motiveless malignity.

ENG 365 GREEK LITERATURE

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course will address the question of the Greek view of men and women in relation both to each other and to the gods as revealed in literature.

ENG 370 RUSSIAN NOVEL

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course involves reading Russian novels in English translation.

ENG 372 NIETZCHE AND THE PROBLEM OF VALUES

Prerequisite: Eng 102

This course involves reading a major work of Nietzsche in connection with other literary and philosophical texts.

ENG 3SGB HEIDEGGER & THE QUESTION OF INTERPRETATION

Description not available at this time.

FL 3SG QUESTS & QUESTIONS IN ARTURIAN LITERATURE, FILM & LIFE

Description not available at this time.

FREN 353 FRENCH LITERATURE: MARIE DE FRANCE TO VOLTAIRE

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

A close examination of major French literary texts from the Middle ages to the Revolution. The course emphasizes the ways in which representative works of pre-Revolutionary French literature are both products of and windows into their historical and cultural contexts. Students will learn and practice analysis of forms of literary expression as they relate to the production of meaning. All texts and discussions are in French.

FREN 354 FRENCH LITERATURE: REVOLUTION TO PRESENT

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

A close examination of major French literary texts from the Revolution to the present read as reflections of and reactions to the historical and cultural movements of the periods in which they were written. Students will learn and practice analysis of forms of literary expression as they relate to the production of meaning. All texts and discussions are in French. Offered alternate years. 

PHIL 104 CONCEPT OF TRUTH

Prerequisite: None

Study of computer system security concepts and domains. The course delivers fundamental information security principles as well as real-world applications and examples.

PHIL 208 MAJOR THINKERS IN DIALOGUE

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the history of ideas through analyses of central and original texts of two great philosophers whose works form a dialogue, focusing not merely on the study of major works of philosophy, but also on the intellectual milieu in which those works are situated and the impact those works have had on a variety of other fields and on society in general. Students will come to know philosophical ideas and will strengthen their critical abilities in regard to basic concepts. 

PHIL 210 PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN NATURE

Prerequisite: None

Many fields of inquiry traffic in a conception of some fixed essence of humanity, in which we all share.  What makes this a philosophical issue is precisely that there is disagreement among philosophers as to whether or not there is such a constant, and what the possessions of such a notion entails. 

PHIL 215 ETHICS

Prerequisite: None

This course is a substantive study of major classical figures in western moral philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. It deals with the questions: What are the fundamental rules that guide our actions? Can we ever rationally justify moral judgments? What is the relationship between ethics and religion? While this course emphasizes theory, the philosophers' views are explicated with regard to contemporary issues. 

PHIL 217 THOUGHT AND BELIEF

Prerequisite: None

The course will probe specific areas where Western philosophy and the Christian tradition interrelate focusing on various religious topics that have philosophical implications, such as the nature of faith, salvation, the character of God, the problem of evil, and the practice of faith.

PHIL 280 APPLIED ETHICS

1, 2 or 3 Credit Hours, depending on length of section taken    Prerequisite: None

Five-, ten-, or fifteen-week sections which investigate moral philosophy as it manifests itself in practical contexts. The focus is on how to arrive at the best moral reasons for acting within practical parameters which present their own special tasks, vocabularies, and sets of problems. A maximum of three hours may be taken for Core humanities credit.

A – SPORTS AND ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral deliberation as applied to the context of sports, specifically youth sports, college athletics, and professional sports.

B – ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral issues as applied to the context of environmentalism. Does nature have inherent world independent of the uses to which it is put by human beings: Do humans have moral duties to animals, plants, or even ec

D – BIOETHICS 1-3

This course is comprised of three ―separable -- one-credit courses regarding medical ethics. Part I has to do with moral foundations in medicine concerning paternalism, informed consent, and professional responsibilities. Part II deals with medical resource allocation, analysis of social policy from various ethical perspectives, and issues surrounding physician-assisted suicide. Part III focuses on research on humans and various issues in reproductive ethics.

H – APPLIED ETHICS: WORKPLACE ETHICS 1-3

This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral issues with particular attention to specific workplace contexts. Includes issues such as the moral foundations of business involving at-will termination policies, workplace speech-codes, privacy issues concerning drug and genetic pre- screening, sexual harassment policies, workplace safety, whistle blowing, intellectual property, bribery, advertising, and moral obligations businesses have to family, community, and the environment

PHIL 309 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisite: PHIL 104, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 recommended

This course is the philosophical study of people in societies with particular attention to the abstract claims they have on each other in the form of individual rights, duties, and privileges, and their demands for equality, justice, and freedom. The course addresses the overlap between political and moral duties and obligations, how moral themes are translated into political rights, and how social categories of concern often conflict with their political articulation. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

PHIL 317 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Prerequisite: PHIL 104, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 recommended

Philosophy of religion is the critical examination of basic religious beliefs and concepts. Its focus is to philosophically consider the claims that people make about religion, e.g., about the nature of God, and assess the conceptual grounds upon which these claims stand. The course evaluates the facts and theories available for and against certain religious claims, facts and theories that are available to any rational person, whether religious or not. The usual topic for this course will be making sense of the concept of God. Other topics may be offered on occasion.

PHIL 318 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Prerequisite: PHIL 104, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 recommended

Focuses on unique, particular issues and their accompanying sets of arguments that have formed their own research categories in philosophy, such as the mind-body problem, the problem of evil, freedom vs. determinism, the issue of reference in the philosophy of language, the problem of universals, the problem of contextualism, or the problem of induction in the philosophy of science. The focus is on the arguments rather than on great books or individuals of historical significance. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

PHIL 330 PHILOSOPHICAL READINGS

Prerequisite: PHIL 104, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 recommended

Philosophical readings courses are to be thought of as a series of great works which when taken together form a sustained whole. The course will conduct its inquiry in complete works which cross time periods and traditions within philosophy. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

PHIL 450 GREAT PHILOSOPHERS

Prerequisite: PHIL 104, 205, 208, 210, 215, or 217 recommended

This course evaluates the thinking of a single major theoretical figure across a series of original texts addressing different subjects, but usually including combinations of that thinker's views on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. The course shows how thinker's views often form an organic whole unified across texts and time periods in their lives, and how ideas develop from earlier to later views, or in response to personal or world events. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

REL 220 TAKING HUMAN LIFE

Prerequisite: None

Deals with the questions of whether it is permissible to take human life and if so, what the conditions might be that warrant or limit such behavior. Examines the issues of euthanasia, abortion, capital punishment, suicide and warfare from literacy, philosophical, social, scientific, and religious perspectives, mainly from the Judeo- Christian viewpoint. 

REL 232 HISTORY OF MODERN CHRISTIANITY

Prerequisite: REL 106

Focuses on the history of Christianity from the mid-17th century to the present. Emphasis will be primarily on the social context within which modern Christianity developed, and secondarily on Christian thought through the period.

REL 240 JEWISH RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

Prerequisite: Core religion course

This course deals with a question that is central to all Jewish religious traditions: how do written and oral traditions combine to create the fabric of contemporary Jewish life? This question will be explored through selected Rabbinic writings and methods of Jewish Biblical interpretation, as well as distinctive Jewish religious practices and observances within the major movements in contemporary Judaism. 

REL 250 UNDERSTANDING ISLAM

Prerequisite: None

An investigation of the basic beliefs and practices in Islam as they are understood and observed in various parts of the world. The course approaches Islam by focusing upon the ways that oral and written traditions combine with cultural factors to create the fabric of contemporary Islamic life. Topics include the foundations of Islam, the sources of legislation in Islam (Qur’an and Hadith), central ritual observances and social aspects of Islam in the contemporary world.

REL 308 FAITH AND SOCIETY

Prerequisite: Core religion course

This course introduces students to several of the major, current topics within political theology--from liberalism's and democracy's champions and detractors, to the role of religious commitments in a pluralist society, to how the Bible is used and read differently in different political contexts, to questions of gender and post-colonialism. In addition, students will develop interpretive skills through the careful reading, analysis, and discussion of texts in contemporary political theology.

REL 320 LEGACY OF PAUL AND PETER IN ITALY

Prerequisite: None

This course combines the literary analysis of early Christian and medieval texts with an eight-day study abroad experience in Italy centering on the cities of Rome, Assisi and Florence. Students gain an understanding of major theological, historical and cultural developments within Roman Catholicism by focusing on the legacies of the apostles Peter and Paul, by tracing themes in the medieval Catholic church and by identifying ways in which these apostles and their writings continue to be relevant in contemporary times.

REL 340 RELIGION AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN AMERICA

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor when offered with a required service learning (SL) component

This course examines the involvement and non-involvement of churches and people of faith in the movement for civil rights in the United States. Contextualized in the History of America's racialized society, both African American and white religious responsibilities for, and responses to, social injustice are examined through the reading of autobiographies, primary documents, and secondary sources. 

REL 3SGK PAUL IN THE GRECO ROMAN WORLD

Description unavailable at this time.

REL 3SGL LUTHER AND THE GERMAN REFORMATION

Description unavailable at this time.

SPAN 372 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

A survey of the milestones of Spanish literature, from its beginnings to the present time. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years. 

SPAN 373 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent

A survey of the milestones of Latin American literature, from its beginnings to the present time. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.  

Math/Logic

Core math/logic courses involve the intrinsic study of and application of formal deductive modes of inquiry.

Primary departments: MathematicsPhilosophy

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

MATH 110 FINITE MATHEMATICS

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra

Covers some topics of modern mathematics including principles of counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and mathematics of finance with applications to biology, business, economics, and other social sciences.

 MATH 201 CALCULUS WITH APPLICATIONS TO MANAGEMENT, LIFE, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES I

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra; one year of high school geometry

This is the first course in the Calculus with Applications sequence for nonmathematics majors. Functions, limits, derivatives and techniques of differentiation with applications to natural, social and management sciences are studied. 

MATH 205 THE CALCULUS I 

5 Credit Hours      Prerequisite: MATH*111 or equivalent

This is the first course in the Calculus sequence for science and math majors. The focus is on theory and techniques for limits, derivatives, antiderivatives and definite integrals, and their applications.

MATH 208 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 18 or above or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH*100

An introductory course designed to meet the needs of students in biology, business, economics, education, nursing, psychology, and sociology.  Sample and theoretical frequency distributions, data dispersion and central tendency, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and analysis of variance are topics studied.

MATH 217 THEORY OF ARITHEMETIC AND GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 18 or above or math SAT score of 480 or above, or MATH*100

A study of the mathematical theories and concepts underlying intermediate arithmetic and geometry. Topics include number theory, number systems, elementary probability, geometry, estimation, mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and communication. The course will emphasize the use of group work and manipulatives.

MATH 223 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I 

Prerequisite: Three years high school college prep math

An introduction to set theory, logic, relations, functions, sequences, algorithms, number theory, and combinatorics.

PHIL 205 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisite: None

Examines formal and informal fallacies as well as deductive and non-deductive reasoning as they emerge from actual historical philosophical texts. Major themes will include fundamental questioning and the search for meaning and truth which have characterized philosophical thinking.

PHIL 220 PRACTICAL THINKING

Prerequisite: None

Examines formal and informal fallacies, symbolic translation, and deductive and non-deductive reasoning as they emerge in everyday practical contexts. The student will learn the basics of argument, master the notions of validity and soundness, and perform some real world proofs to enable him to defend against the persuasive tools used against him daily.

PHIL 320 SYMBOLIC LOGIC

Prerequisite: PHIL*220 recommended

This course is a more advanced offering of techniques in logical analysis.  Students will focus on constructing deductive arguments, engage in symbolic translation, recognize formal argument forms, do truth-table analysis, conduct proofs, and employ sentential and quantificational logics.

Natural Sciences

Core courses in the natural sciences involve the application of the scientific method primarily to events in the natural world, explored via applied inquiry.

Primary departments: BiologyChemistryGeology,Physics

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

BIO 100 HUMAN BIOLOGY 

4 Credit Hours    Prerequisite: None

This course addresses the questions of what it means for cells to be alive and how individual cells are integrated into a complex, selfregulating human organism capable of survival in its own right. This includes an examination of the functions of cells, the idea of homeostasis (physiological equilibrium) and the mechanisms of disease. Three lectures and one two- hour laboratory per week. This course does not count toward a biology major or minor. Meets Core credit for natural sciences. Offered every semester and online during the summer.

BIO 103 CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY

Prerequisite: None

This course provides an introduction to the diverse ways that biologists study and understand the living world. Students will engage with the fundamental mechanisms of life by examining key discoveries in biology ranging from the molecular and cellular scale to the interactions of organisms at a global scale. Case studies in modern questions facing biologists will illustrate the process of science and demonstrate how it is used to understand the natural world. Students will use online and at home lab activities and field observations to conduct experiments and analyze data. This course is intended for non-science majors and cannot be used as elective credit for programs in the department of Biology/Toxicology.

BIO 107 PLANTS AND CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

An examination from a global perspective of the role that plants have played in the history of civilization, with consideration of the biology and chemistry of plants, their availability in different parts of the world, and their uses for food, fiber, beverages, and medicine. Current issues in agriculture and plant biotechnology are also considered. Two lecturediscussion periods and one two-hour laboratory per week. This course does not count toward the biology major or minor. Offered each Spring.

BIO 110 ECOLOGY AND THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite: None

This course examines the characteristics of ecosystems, the ways in which they change with time, and the impact of human activities on those changes. Included in this will be the study of the science behind current issues such as biologic al resource management, pollution, and global climate change. Three lectures and one two-hour lab per week. This course does not count toward a biology major or minor. Offered each semester.

BIO 111 WETLANDS & WATERWAYS

Prerequisite: None

This course is organized around the central question: How does the cycling of water shape the world in which we live? This course will use scientific method to investigate the ecological roles of aquatic ecosystems (streams and rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater) and to study the ways in which humans and other species alter the functioning of these ecosystems. Students will practice a variety of investigative techniques from library study to field and laboratory work, and they will exercise their skills in critical thinking and analysis. Written and oral communications will also be emphasized. This course does not count toward a biology major or minor

BIO 129 DRUGS, POISONS, POLLUTANTS, AND THE HUMAN PERCEPTION OF RISK

Prerequisite: None

In this course, students will learn about the basic principles of toxicology, the study of poisons and their effects on the body. Discussions will revolve around the central theme of risk as it relates to potentially toxic chemicals that we are exposed to in our everyday lives. Specifically, students will learn to distinguish between chemicals that are truly dangerous and those that are only perceived to be dangerous by critically evaluating competing predictions of toxicity rom potentially biased rival sources. They will also learn how to assess the actual risk posed to living organisms from contamination, which is often contrary to the information that is presented to the public by various media, industry, and environmental groups. In addition, students will learn how contamination produced on a local scale can ultimately become a risk to the entire global community. This course does not count toward a biology or toxicology major or minor.

BIO 1SGC BIOLOGY OF THE MICROBES

Description not available.

BIO 201 MOLECULAR & CELLULAR BASIS OF LIFE

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry or equivalent strongly recommended

This course centers on the question: What are the molecular and cellular processes that define life, and how are they sustained from generation to generation? In the process of studying this question, students will have the opportunity to examine the application of the scientific method to the study of the fundamentals of cellular structure and function, as well as to investigate the molecular transmission of information from generation to generation and the integration of cells into whole functioning organisms. Three lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. This course is designed for science majors and those planning careers in the health sciences.

BIO 202 ORGANISMS, ADAPTATION, AND DIVERSITY

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite:  None

This course centers on the question: How do organisms solve the problems of survival, and how are the solutions that have evolved influenced by the environment? Students will examine how observed similarities and differences in organismal structure and function relate to environmental pressures, as well as studying how these observations can be used to construct a logical theory of evolutionary relationships between different organisms. In addition, the complex interactions that have developed between different organisms and between organisms and their environment will be examined. Three lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. This course is designed for science majors and those planning careers in the health sciences.

BIO 2SGI CELLS-THE BASIS OF LIFE

Description not available.

CHEM 103 GENERAL CHEMISTRY

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite: High school chemistry, 3 yrs High School math

This course introduces the properties of atoms and molecules using the logical processes of scientific reasoning and investigation. Models of the atom are developed using periodicity and quantum mechanics, and these models are extended to molecules, with an emphasis on the effects of forces within a molecule and between molecules. Applications will be made to the biological and geological sciences, medicine, and the environment. The laboratory emphasizes the development of technical skills using safe laboratory practices. Inquiry approaches to problem-solving are introduced, and conclusions are drawn based on data at hand. Chemical and scientific thinking skills are assessed using formal laboratory reports.

CHEM 104 GENERAL CHEMISTRY

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite: CHEM*103

This course examines chemical reactions using the logical processes of scientific reasoning and investigation. Chemical reactions are studied from the perspectives of thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics. Applications will be made to the biological and geological sciences, medicine, and the environment. The laboratory emphasizes the development of technical skills using safe laboratory practices. Inquiry approaches to problem-solving are introduced, and conclusions are drawn based on data at hand. Chemical and scientific thinking skills are assessed using formal laboratory reports.

CHEM 250 LEAD AND CIVILIZATION

Prerequisite: None

An intensive examination of the role lead has played in the history of civilization, with emphasis on how the uses and toxicity of this metal are related to its chemical properties.

CHEM 251 MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE

Prerequisite: None

The vibrant world of chemistry is explored by seeking answers to three specific questions: 1) What is a molecule? 2) How are molecules constructed? 3) How are molecules characterized? Answers to these questions are sought by an in-depth investigation of organic molecules that are either encountered in daily life or are, in part, critical for sustaining life. Consequently, students are introduced to the logical processes of scientific reasoning and investigation and invited to contemplate the impact of chemistry upon society.

CHEM 252 CHEMISTRY OF CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION

Prerequisite: High school chemistry

This course relates real world applications of analytical chemistry to the investigation of crimes. The underlying chemistry and biochemistry involved in forensic analysis are addressed. Also, the exploration of scientific inquiry as it relates to developing hypotheses and providing proof of a crime based on chemical evidence is investigated. This course does not count toward any major in the natural sciences

CHEM 253 CHEMICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LIFE 

4 Credit Hours     Prerequisite: None

This course explores the question: What do living organisms look like from a chemical perspective? Answering this question requires an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts of inorganic, organic and biochemistry. The laboratory will enhance understanding of chemical concepts and the scientific method, and develop the student's critical thinking skills. The course assumes no chemistry background. It does not meet major or elective requirements of majors in Chemistry/Geology/Physics or Biology/Toxicology Departments. Three lectures and one-1hr.50min. lab per week

CHEM 350 SCIENCE AS A CULTURAL FORCE

A – THE MAKING OF THE BOMB

B – THE TOBACCO WARS

C – SCIENCE AND HUMAN NATURE

D – EVOLUTION: FOR & AGAINST

E – SCIENCE AND RATIONALITY

Prerequisite: Any natural science core course

An inquiry into the nature of the scientific method in relation to human culture and its use in gaining and applying new knowledge. This course constitutes a substantial interdisciplinary investigation of the impact of science and technology upon society by way of a sustained look at one particular scientific issue or question for the semester. The ethical dimensions of advances in science and technology are explored in detail. Meets Core credit for humanities or natural sciences, but not both. May be taken only once for Core credit.

GEOL 209 NATURAL DISASTERS:VOLCANOES AND EARTHQUAKES

Prerequisite: None

What are natural disasters and how can science reduce the damage done by events such as earthquakes, tsunami, and volcanic eruptions? This course will examine these events and how scientists determine why and attempt to predict when and where natural disasters are most likely to occur, as well as identify what steps endangered communities can take in order to avoid or minimize the danger posed by these natural processes. Student who are required or elect to take GEOL 101 for their major or minor cannot enroll in this class for credit toward their major or minor.

GEOL 210 NATURAL DISASTERS: SEVERE WEATHER

Prerequisite: None

What are natural disasters, and how can science lessen the damage done by events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe weather? This course will examine these events and how geologists attempt to predict when and where natural disasters are most likely to occur, as well as identify what steps endangered communities can take in order to avoid or minimize the danger posed by these natural processes. Meets Core credit for natural sciences.

GEOL 211 DISCOVERING THE ICE AGE

Prerequisite: None

How was the Ice Age discovered? This class will examine how 19th century scientists used stones, bones, and landforms to bring about a revolution in our understanding of earth history. It will also examine the scientific evidence upon which current models of the Pleistocene Ice Age are built, as well as how ice, sediment, and rock cores are providing us with new insights into past and future ice ages. 

GEOL 212 ARCHEOLOGY & HUMAN ANTIQUITY

Prerequisite: None

Where did humans come from? How far back in time can we trace the human lineage? The question of human antiquity is a topic of universal interest and speculation. Archaeology is a discipline that seeks to answer this question. This class will critically examine some of the scientific techniques archaeologists have used, discoveries they have made, and conclusions they have reached about human antiquity.

GEOL 213 ASTEROIDS, COMETS, AND CATASTROPHISM

Prerequisite: None

How has the discovery of giant impact craters changed our understanding of earth history? This class will examine the scientific evidence for repeated asteroid and comet collisions with the earth, the catastrophic effect of these collisions, and the re-emergence of catastrophism as a viable paradigm in modern scientific theories. 

PHYS 107 THE HIDDEN LIFE OF THE STARS

Prerequisite: High school geometry and trigonometry

Stars have a rich history in the development of our understanding of nature. Stellar life cycles will be used to illustrate concepts in modern astronomy. The history of understanding the stars will lead from Copernicus and Galileo to modern ideas in particle physics and relativity. Basic concepts from astronomy will be developed in an algebraic framework and applied to understanding the life cycle of a star, including birth, main cycle, and death. There may be evening observation field trips.

PHYS 320 ORIGINS OF THE UNIVERSE

Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry

A look from the scientific view point into the origin of the universe. The course takes a conceptual approach in understanding the two great physical theories of the twentieth century, Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, followed by applications in particle physics and cosmology. No previous science knowledge is assumed or required.

Religion

Core courses in religion are academic rather than devotional, and explore the traditions, doctrines, and practices of religious life. From the perspective of the liberal arts, the academic study of religion is the critical and rigorous investigation of matters of belief in God, faith, and ritual practice, and includes theological and confessional traditions. Given the historic role of the Brethren Church and the Judeo-Christian heritage at Ashland University, it is expected that many core religion courses will have Christian themes and Biblical content. Courses that examine other world religions may be included.

Primary Department: Religion

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

 REL 106 EXPLORING THE BIBLE

Prerequisite: None

An introductory study in which students gain an overview of the Bible, engage in literary analysis of Biblical texts and explore the Bible’s contemporary relevance. College-level writing skills are required.

REL 107 EXPLORING WORLD RELIGIONS

Prerequisite: None

An introductory exploration of historical developments, beliefs and practices in selected Eastern and Western world religious traditions. Since students will be introduced to methods for analyzing and interpreting sacred texts, college level writing skills are required.

REL 109 EXPLORING CHRISTIAN ETHICS

Prerequisite: None

An introductory exploration of principles, movements and topics of Christian theological ethics. This course guides students through complex questions of moral reasoning and some of the Biblical, historical and theological resources used to address them. Topics may include immigration, homosexuality and same-sex marriage, forgiveness and reconciliation, justice, war, and abortion. College level writing skills are required.

Social Sciences

Social Science courses focus on the study of how people live, both as individuals and as members of society. Such courses might study humans as individuals, as members of various groups, as participating in and shaped by various institutions, or as members of society as a whole. While no single method characterizes the social sciences, each social science course is concerned to understand the method used in its attempt to understand how humans live.

Primary departments: PsychologyPolitical Science,Social WorkEconomicsCriminal Justice

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.

ECON 101 MARKET FUNDAMENTALS

Prerequisite: None

This course will engage students in the economic way of thinking by taking an in-depth look at market fundamentals. Why, how, and who uses markets and what do we do when they fail? Students will be introduced to the economist's view of the world through extensive discussion, analysis, and writing. Does not count toward an economic major or minor. 

ECON 232 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

Prerequisite: None

Analysis of the pricing processes in a private enterprise economy under varying competitive conditions, their role in the allocation of resources and the functional distribution of national income. Special emphasis is given to theoretical analysis as applied to business problems.

ECON 233 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the determinants of national income, employment and the price level in the private enterprise system, including analysis of consumption and saving, private investment, government fiscal policy, business fluctuations, and the interaction between money and national income. International economic relations are also emphasized.

ECON 301 GAME THEORY

Prerequisite: Core math/logic requirement

Techniques using classical game theory, auction design, controlled human subject experiments, evolutionary game theory, and agent-based computer models are used to understand and solve situations involving potential conflict and cooperation such as military strategies, the auction of FCC licenses, the Middle East conflict, and the rise of resistant strains of bacteria in hospitals. While game theory is demanding in terms of reasoning ability, the focus of the class will be qualitative rather than quantitative analysis.

ECON 331 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC

Prerequisite: ECON 232 or ECON 233

In today's world economy, countries around the globe have fashioned their own versions of economic system compatible with their culture and social values. This course will focus on why and how this has occurred, through the investigation and critique of various countries' economic systems from a cultural point of view. Special emphasis will be given to the understanding of selected countries (including Germany, Japan, France, Sweden, Brazil, Russia, China, and India) and cultures and prevailing economic policies and institutions.

POLSC 101 UNDERSTANDING POLITICS

Prerequisite: None

This course immerses students in the intensive study of the fundamental question: What is politics? Our goal is to understand how politics shapes society and what distinguishes the political from the economic social, artistic, religious, etc. We will read several fundamental works of political thought and statesmanship which may include the Bible, Plato's Apology, Aristotle's Politics, Machiavelli's The Prince, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar or Henry V, Locke's Two treatises of Government, Rousseau's Social Contract, Penn Warren's All the King's Men, or Churchill's The Gathering Storm.

POLSC 345 WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT III: EARLY MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Prerequisite: POLSC*101

This course is designed to immerse students in the study of modern political thought, whose central concerns are human security, comfort, and liberty. We will examine this new politics of freedom by reading several great works of political philosophy from thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke.

POLSC 365 CONTEMPORARY GERMANY

Prerequisite: None

A study of contemporary Germany with an emphasis on the establishment and character of democracy in that country. Examines the statesmen and politicians, as well as the constitutional, social, economic and intellectual factors that help to explain the German polity since World War II.

POLSC 431 HUMAN BEING AND CITIZEN

Prerequisite: Senior status

An attempt to understand the great issues animating politics-freedom, justice, equality, ethnicity-from the point of view of other disciple-lines and perspectives. The seminar will examine what it means to be a citizen, something of what it means to be a human being, and how each depends upon the other. 

PSYC 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I

Prerequisite: None

This course centers around the question, How do we explain human behavior? Inquiries are framed in the context of the major theoretical perspectives emergent from the sociohistorical evolution of psychology as a field of study. Behavior topics are examined by comparing and contrasting the assumptions, research methods, and conclusions embedded within the biological, psychoanalytical, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, and sociocultural theories. Psychological inquiries also include evaluation of how these diverse approaches converge on questions about multiple influences on human behavior.

PSYC 102 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY II

Prerequisite: PSYC*101

A continuation of 101 with an emphasis on science and the scientific method as it pertains to selected psychological topics and issues. 

PSYC 218 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the nature of adolescent behavior. The physical, cognitive, and psycho- social development of adolescents are examined in the contexts of peers, family, schools, work, and culture/society, using the theoretical perspectives identify that will allow the adolescent to function effectively in adulthood. 

SOC 111 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY

Prerequisite: None

The focus of this course is centered on an in depth examination of social forces and their impact on social structure, sociocultural evolution and the socialization process. The theoretical perspectives, concepts, and principles of sociology are then applied to various areas of sociology such as social organization, culture, social structure, social interaction, social stratification, social inequality, social deviance and social institutions.

SOC 301 RACE, ETHNIC AND MINORITY ISSUES

Prerequisite: None

The course will examine the interaction between the dominant and minority cultures particularly within the United States. Students will be introduced to a transnational perspective; exploring groups who have immigrated to the United States, but share a set of cultural values shaped by their homeland, especially in the areas of human interaction, social expectations, economics, religious and political movements. The concept of culture will be discussed in terms of both the majority culture, which provides the social framework that encourages assimilation and fusion, and the minority sub-culture that strives and struggles to maintain a sense of identity. The consequences of living in a multi-ethnic, multi- faith, and multi-cultural society will also be studied.

SOC 340 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

Prerequisite: None

This course explores the similarities and differences among families and marriages, family structures and functions, changes throughout the family life cycle, and the history of marriage and family in American culture. Critical topics in the area of marriage and family relationship, including events and attitudes leading to the formation of family units (defining love, dating, pairing up, cohabitation, marriage); problems and experiences arising from the institution of the family (gender roles, conflict, parenting, work/life balance, divorce, remarriage); and development of a philosophy regarding marriage and family life will be explored.

 

Critical Cultural Inquiry (CCI)

For detailed information on the Global Passport Strategies Initiative, click here.

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.  

FL 211 THE LANGUAGE & CULTURE OF QUEBEC

Prerequisite: None

This course emphasizes the historical and contemporary aspects of the language and culture of Quebec, Canada. Students explore the development of oral histories within the province and Quebec’s efforts to maintain its unique identity both within predominately English-speaking Canada and the French-speaking world. Taught in English. Literature read in translation.

FL 213 DISCOVERING THE FRENCHSPEAKING WORLD

Prerequisite: None

This course emphasizes the historical and modern characteristics of the French-speaking world. Students explore the global expansion of French culture from the pre-Colonial period until the present day by examining themes including language, identity formation, and diaspora. Taught in English. Literature read in translation.

FL 220 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Prerequisite: None

This course critically examines contemporary Latin American Revolutionary literature, in English translation. Taught in English.

FL 221 U.S. MEXICO-BORDER LITERATURE

Prerequisite: None

This course critically examines the political, socio-economic, historical, cultural, and linguistic features of the U.S.-Mexico border, including the relationships between the two nations, through literary readings and cultural analysis. Taught in English.

FL 315 FRENCH WOMEN WRITERS

Prerequisite: None

This course examines literary works by French women writers from the Middle Ages to the 21st century through the optic of specifically historicized feminist criticism and theory. Taught in English. Literature read in translation.

FREN 151 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I

Prerequisite: Placement or no prior study of French. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels

A comprehensive introductory course in French language for today's global world. Students develop oral and written proficiency through cultural studies. Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 152 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II

Prerequisite:  FREN 151, placement, or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into other levels

A comprehensive introductory course in French language for today's global world. Students develop oral and written proficiency through cultural studies. Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 200 INTERMEDIATE LEVEL INTENSIVE FRENCH STUDY ABROAD

Prerequisite: FREN 132, placement, or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into other levels

A program designed to provide students with an intermediate level immersion experience. Students will attend six hours of language instruction per day, participate in cultural experiences, and live with families of the host culture. Orientation and debriefing sessions on campus are required.

FREN 251 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

Prerequisite: FREN 152 placement or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into other levels.

A course designed to increase the students understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. Students develop oral and written proficiency through and exploration of the French arts including architecture, cuisine, fashion, music, painting, etc. Lab work required. Taught in French.

FREN 252 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

Prerequisite: FREN 251, placement, or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into other levels

A continuation of FREN 251. Students develop oral and written proficiency through and exploration of French media sources including music videos, television, film, and social media. Lab work required. Taught in French. Offered annually.

FREN 300 ADVANCED LEVEL INTENSIVE FRENCH STUDY ABROAD

Prerequisite: FREN 252, placement, or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who have placed into other levels

A program designed to provide students with an advanced-level immersion experience. Students will attend six hours of language instruction per day, participate in cultural experiences, and live with families of the host culture. Orientation and debriefing sessions on campus are required.

FREN 301 FRENCH CIVILIZATION FROM LASCAUX TO VERSAILLES

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

In order to understand contemporary France and the French sense of identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. French social and political institutions from the Revolution of 1789 to the present will be examined with an emphasis on the evolution of the core values of the Fifth Republic (liberty, equality, social solidarity, and the lay state) and their expression in the French context. Taught in French.

FREN 302 FRENCH CIVILIZATION FROM REVOLUTION TO PRESENT

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

In order to understand contemporary France and the French sense of identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. French social and political institutions from the Revolution of 1789 to the present will be examined with an emphasis on the evolution of the core values of the Fifth Republic (liberty, equality, social solidarity, and the lay state) and their expression in the French context. Taught in French.

FREN 303 FRENCH WRITTEN EXPRESSION

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

The course offers intensive review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary through structured reading and writing activities. Reading selections include cultural information from France and other Frenchspeaking countries. Taught in French. Offered alternate years

FREN 304 FRENCH STYLISTICS

Prerequisite: FREN 303 or equivalent

This course extends the concept of advanced French grammar and composition to questions of style and rhetoric. It will familiarize students with the richness of expression of the French language through an in-depth analysis of a variety of texts and writing practice. Taught in French.

FREN 305 FRENCH PHONETICS

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

A course designed to provide a review of standard French pronunciation and an introduction to phonology, phonetics, and dialectology including corrective exercises and a contrastive analysis of French and English sound systems. Taught in French. Offered alternate years.

FREN 357 FRENCH ORAL EXPRESSION

Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 252 or placement/transfer equivalent

This course focuses on the practice and development of conversational fluency through a variety of culturally-related themes. Taught in French. Offered alternate years.

GER 161 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the German language and culture with practice in the basic skills of the language. Lab work required. Taught in German. Offered infrequently.

GER 162 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

Prerequisite: GER 161 or equivalent

A continuation of FL 161. Lab work required. Taught in German. Offered infrequently.

GER 261 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

Prerequisite: GER 162 or equivalent

A course designed to increase the student's understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. Lab work required. Taught in German. Offered infrequently.

GER 262 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

Prerequisite: GER 261 or equivalent

Continuation of GER 261. Lab work required. Taught in German

LTN 110 ELEMENTARY LATIN I

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax; and, through the study of the language, the culture of ancient Rome.

LTN 210 ELEMENTARY LATIN II

Prerequisite: LTN 110

A continuation of LTN 110. By the end of Latin 210, students will be beginning to read ancient Latin texts.

LTN 310 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I

Prerequisite: LTN 210

This course reviews and confirms knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while also introducing students to Latin authors such as Horace, Cicero, Catullus, or Vergil, through which students will deepen their knowledge of the life, culture, and politics of ancient Rome. 

PORT 141 ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE I

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to Portuguese language and culture with practice in the basic skills of the language. There will be a one-hour per week required laboratory. Taught in Portuguese. Offered infrequently.

PORT 142 ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE II

Prerequisite: PORT 141

A continuation of PORT 141 Elementary Portuguese I. Taught in Portuguese. Offered infrequently.

PORT 241 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE I

Prerequisite: PORT 142

A course designed to increase the student's understanding of the language by building on the skills learned in the elementary course. There will be a one-hour per week required laboratory. Taught in Portuguese.

SPAN 171 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Prerequisite: Placement or no prior study of Spanish. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels.

A course designed to develop elementary interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication skills in the Spanish language in cultural context. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 172 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Prerequisite: Placement or no prior study of Spanish. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels.

A course designed to further develop elementary interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication skills in the Spanish language in cultural context. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 200 INTERMEDIATE LEVEL INTENSIVE SPANISH STUDY ABROAD

Prerequisite: SPAN 172, placement or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels.

A program designed to provide students with an intermediate-level immersion experience. Students will attend six hours of language instruction per day, participate in cultural experiences, and live with families of the host cultures. Orientation and debriefing sessions on campus are required. 6 hours, or 3 hours plus SPAN 271.

SPAN 271 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

Prerequisite: SPAN 172, placement or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels

A course designed to develop intermediate interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication skills in the Spanish language in cultural context. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 272 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Prerequisite: SPAN 271, placement or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels

A course designed to further develop intermediate interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication skills in the Spanish language in cultural context. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 300 ADVANCED LEVEL INTENSIVE SPANISH STUDY ABROAD

Prerequisite: SPAN 272, placement or transfer equivalent. Note: Not open to students who placed in other levels.

A program designed to provide students with an advanced-level immersion experience. Students will attend six hours of language instruction per day, participate in cultural experiences, and live with families of the host cultures. Orientation and debriefing sessions on campus are required.

SPAN 307 SPANISH PHONETICS

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

A course designed to provide a review of Spanish pronunciation and an introduction to phonetics and phonology, including the study of features of principal dialects and a contrastive analysis of Spanish and English sound systems. Language lab required. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.

SPAN 310 SPANISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

The course offers an intensive review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary. Students will apply the material studied and develop their written expression in Spanish through a writing and revising process that leads to portfolio assessment. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

SPAN 311 CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

In order to understand contemporary Spanish identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. The social organization and forces of Spain from ancient times to the present are examined with an emphasis on contemporary Spain. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.

SPAN 312 CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

In order to understand contemporary Latin American identity, this course explores and analyzes current issues, cultural manifestations, historical and geopolitical developments, and internal and external relations. The social organization and forces of Latin America from ancient times to the present are examined with an emphasis on contemporary Spain. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.

SPAN 377 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent.

Designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the grammatical concepts learned in the basic language program and to improve conversational fluency through oral exercises, discussions, and activities related to everyday situations. Taught in Spanish. Offered alternate years.

SPAN 378 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH FOR THE PROFESSIONS

Prerequisite: SPAN 200 or 272 or placement/transfer equivalent. A project based course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the grammatical concepts learned in the basic language program and to improve conversational fluency through oral exercises, discussions, and activities related to the profession of the individual student's intended major. Taught in Spanish. Offered annually.

CCI Course with study-away and study abroad components which includes the required completion of FL 299:

AHA, Segovia, Spain

All CCIS and USAC programs

COBE in Taiwan

COST (Consortium of Overseas Student Teaching)

           EDEC 460 Sa: ECE

           EDCI 467 Sa: MG

           EDCI 461 Sa: AYA

Paris Fashion Institute

AU in Germany

AU in France

AU in Costa Rica

Semester at Sea

HIS/POLSC 341 (when approved tour is offered)

FM 211 (when approved tour is offered)

Honors 390 (when approved tour is offered)

HS 221 (when approved tour is offered)

HS 380 (when approved tour is offered)

REL 260 (with instructor-approved short-term mission)

REL 375 Understanding Israel (when approved tour is offered)

COBE in Brazil

Fontys University in the Netherlands Exchange Program

Blaise Pascal University in France Exchange Program

UAB in Spain Exchange Program

Providence University in Taiwan Exchange Program

Core Curriculum

Ashland University’s core curriculum, consistent with the liberal arts, seeks to develop wisdom and transferable, lifelong skills. Through 10 subject areas and a variety of teaching formats, the core prepares students to think with reason, act with skill and live with values.