Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics

Contact Us

Department Chair

Dr. Paul Hyman
Associate Professor of Biology
Chair, Department of Biology and Toxicology
319, Kettering Science Building
419.207.6309
phyman@ashland.edu

Administrative Assistant

Brenda Rodeback
Administrative Assistant
221, Kettering Science Building
419.289.5261
brodebac@ashland.edu

Programs

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Collaborating in Chemistry for Modern Advancements

New medicines, materials, cleaner fuels, innovative criminal lab procedures, and so much more of modern life depends on advancements in the diverse fields of Chemistry. So if you’re looking for an exciting and challenging scientific career, start by exploring the Chemistry and Biochemistry program...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Digging Deeper into the World

Do you have a passion for the great outdoors? Pursue this passion in the Geology program at Ashland University.

When you study geological sciences at Ashland University, you’ll gain a deeper appreciation for our physical world, its tumultuous past and current activity,...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS, B.S.Ed
Becoming a Geology Business Leader

Do you want to be part of a brand new major that blends geoscience and business?

Ashland University recognizes there is a current gap in the geoscience industry: geologists know little about the business aspects of their professional and people in business...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS, BSED
Furthering Our Physical World

Are you interested in exploring the mysteries of our world and universe? Consider the Physics program at Ashland University.

As the foundation of all other sciences, physics covers everything from the universe’s largest galaxies to the tiniest subatomic particles. Ashland University’s Physics program allows you...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Educating a Scientific Youth

Do you have a passion for teaching and want to introduce young minds to the wonders of science? Ashland University’s teacher-training program is highly regarded as one of the best in Ohio. When you graduate with a degree in any of our science education majors, you’ll...

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you. Current Undergraduate Catalog

Department Course Rotations (CHEM, GEOL, PHYS)

Current Academic Year

AYA Life Science Education Four-Year Guide

2019-2020 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

2018-2019 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics Four-Year Guide

2017-2018 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics Four-Year Guide

2016-2017 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

2015-2016 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Robert Bergosh, Associate Professor
Dr. Robert Bergosh
Associate Professor of Chemistry
422 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5871 / rbergosh@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
headshot.jpg
Dr. Steven Boyer
Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry
130, Kettering Science Building
419.289.5497 / sboyer5@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Nigel Brush, Professor of Geology
Dr. Nigel Brush
Professor of Geology
421 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5271 / nbrush@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics , Environmental Science Program
Dr. Rebecca Corbin
Dr. Rebecca Corbin
Professor of Chemistry, Chair, Chemistry, Geology and Physics Department
423 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5268 / rcorbin@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Perry Corbin, Professor of Chemistry
Dr. Perry Corbin
Professor of Chemistry
420 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5269 / pcorbin@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Rodney Michael, Associate Professor
Dr. Rodney Michael
Associate Professor of Physics
206 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5272 / rmichael@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Brian Mohney, Professor
Dr. Brian Mohney
Professor of Chemistry
417 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5962 / bmohney@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Trina Mohney, Professional Instructor
Trina Mohney
Professional Instructor
415 , Kettering Science Building
419.207.4526 / tmohney@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Jeffrey Weidenhamer, Professor
Dr. Jeffrey Weidenhamer
Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of Chemistry
419 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5281 / jweiden@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics , Environmental Science Program

Science Day

Mohican District Science Day is the district science fair for students in grades 5-12 in schools of Ashland, Richland, Wayne, Holmes, Medina, Lorain, Huron, and Erie counties. Students who enter District Science Day must receive superior ratings at science fairs held locally at their own school, county, or school district. Projects that have followed Ohio Academy of Science (OAS) standards from students who come from schools where local science fairs are not held are also welcome providing you contact the Director for special permission. Students receiving superior ratings at the district level may then be selected to compete in the Ohio Academy of Science's State Science Fair at The Ohio State University on May 11, 2020.

Learn more about the Mohican District Science Day!

Science News

Ashland Toxicology and Forensic Biology major receives Ohio EPA scholarship

Senior Maria Kern is the latest AU Science student to receive a $2500 scholarship from the Ohio EPA’s Environmental Education Fund. Maria has conducted environmental science research as part of our University’s water monitoring program at our Black Fork wetlands preserve. More recently she has started a new research project with chemistry professor Dr. Jeff Weidenhamer. In the summer of 2018 Maria was part of the field research internship program at Central Michigan University. Maria is also a member of the University’s honors program and a Choose Ohio First scholar.

Maria writes about her new scholarship:
Winning the 2019 OEEF Scholarship was a great start to my senior year. This award provides valuable scholarship opportunities which allow natural science students with experience in environmental research to continue their education. This award will allow me to focus more fully on my classes and research without having to worry about covering the cost of books or any tuition not covered by other scholarships. Additional focus on my research will increase the quality of my capstone which I will be defending in the spring, and may create new job opportunities for me after graduation.
Maria is the 24th Ashland University science student to be chosen for the Ohio EPA scholarship since 2006, including four just last year....Read more

A Summer of Mammoths


Over the summer, Dr. Nigel Brush, Professor of Geology, has been kept busy identifying various rocks, fossils, and human artifacts exposed by recent heavy rains and flash floods here in NE Ohio. While this summer’s heavy rains were not good for farmers, as well as some home owners living near streams, it was a windfall for geologists and archaeologists as nature accidentally revealed some of the ancient treasures buried beneath the earth’s surface.

Mammoth tooth found at the Inn at Honey RunThe fossil that has generated the greatest interest was a mammoth tooth found by a twelve-year-old boy in a stream bed near the Inn at Honey Run, located a few miles outside the town of Millersburg in Holmes County. Nigel confirmed that this large tooth was indeed a mammoth tooth. He and Jeff Dilyard (a member of the Ashland/Wooster/Columbus Archaeological and Geologic Consortium) subsequently visited the Inn to examine the tooth and the find location. With permission from the Inn owner, Jason Niles, they surveyed the stream bed and banks upstream from the find site, but found no additional mammoth teeth or bones.
Two types of mammoth lived in Ohio during the Ice Age: Woolly Mammoth and Jefferson Mammoth. These mammoths had four large teeth (two upper and two lower). As the ridges on each tooth wore down by grinding grasses and small seeds, the tooth was shoved forward in the jaw by a new tooth until the old tooth fell out. Over their lifetime of 60-80 years, a mammoth would have six complete sets of teeth. Therefore, a single mammoth might lose some 20 teeth before developing its final set of teeth.
Another member of the elephant family that lived in Ohio during the Ice Age was the American Mastodon. Mastodons were slightly smaller than...Read more

Ashland Toxicology major receives travel award to national meeting

Ashland University Toxicology, Biology, and Environmental Science triple-major Shelby Reutter recently attended the national meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in Baltimore, Maryland with support from the society's Undergraduate Diversity Program Travel Award. This travel program provides full support for travel and housing to the annual SOT meeting and a program designed for undergraduate students to learn about careers in toxicology. Shelby is the fifth of our students since 2010 to receive this award.

Shelby had the following to say about her experience at the meeting:
The Society of Toxicology meeting was a wonderful experience. I had the opportunity to listen to various professionals within the field of Toxicology (in industry, academia, and government) and it really expanded my knowledge of the whole area. Throughout the program I met with other undergraduate and graduate students and got a better understanding of potential career paths I could take. At the expo I was able to see other students' research projects, I met with companies throughout America that hire people with a toxicology background, and I gathered a lot of information about graduate school options.Soon after returning from the meeting Shelby secured a paid summer internship with drug safety testing firm Charles River Laboratory here in Ashland, Ohio, and will continue working there part-time this Fall.

The SOT is taking applications for this coming Spring's travel award program, with materials due October 18th. You can find details here. If you are interested in applying you should contact Dr. Mason Posner in the Bio/Tox Department.


...Read more

AU grad receives prestigious Yeager Award


Corianna Borton ’19 (center) with adviser Dr. Brian Mohney (center left) and co-adviser Dr. Jeff Weidenhamer (center right).May 2019 AU graduate Corianna Borton was selected as the recipient of this year’s Ernest B. Yeager award by the Cleveland Chapter of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) and the Analytical Topics Group of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The Yeager Award honors the memory of Ernest B. Yeager, the Frank Hovorka Professor Emeritus at Case Western Reserve University who was known for his pioneering contributions to the fundamental understanding of electrochemical reactions and to the development of fuel cell and battery technology.The award was presented on May 22nd at the annual Conference on Spectroscopy and Analytical Chemistry at John Carroll University, where Borton gave a presentation of her research that has focused on collecting, separating and analyzing plant root exudates (harmala alkaloids) from Syrian rue in soil using silicone tube microextraction probes—a technique for repeated sampling of lipophilic compounds in soil developed in Dr. Mohney’s and Dr. Weidenhamer’s lab. Syrian Rue releases molecules into the soil that affect the growth of other plants in the vicinity and negatively impact organisms that live in the soil near the plant. Borton’s technique utilized silicone probes to sequester and concentrate lipophilic organic compounds allowing her to quantify the root and soil alkaloids. Once sequestered, compounds were extracted from the silicone and the concentration of each compound was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), fluorescence spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. She has used these techniques to probe the dynamic release of harmala alkaloids from plants and to examine the effect the alkaloids have on monocot and dicot plants. The Yeager award recognizes Borton’s achievements in independent research, particularly in the application of spectroscopy to the...Read more

Contact Us

Department Chair

Dr. Paul Hyman
Associate Professor of Biology
Chair, Department of Biology and Toxicology
319, Kettering Science Building
419.207.6309
phyman@ashland.edu

Administrative Assistant

Brenda Rodeback
Administrative Assistant
221, Kettering Science Building
419.289.5261
brodebac@ashland.edu

Programs

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Collaborating in Chemistry for Modern Advancements

New medicines, materials, cleaner fuels, innovative criminal lab procedures, and so much more of modern life depends on advancements in the diverse fields of Chemistry. So if you’re looking for an exciting and challenging scientific career, start by exploring the Chemistry and Biochemistry program...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Digging Deeper into the World

Do you have a passion for the great outdoors? Pursue this passion in the Geology program at Ashland University.

When you study geological sciences at Ashland University, you’ll gain a deeper appreciation for our physical world, its tumultuous past and current activity,...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS, B.S.Ed
Becoming a Geology Business Leader

Do you want to be part of a brand new major that blends geoscience and business?

Ashland University recognizes there is a current gap in the geoscience industry: geologists know little about the business aspects of their professional and people in business...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS, BSED
Furthering Our Physical World

Are you interested in exploring the mysteries of our world and universe? Consider the Physics program at Ashland University.

As the foundation of all other sciences, physics covers everything from the universe’s largest galaxies to the tiniest subatomic particles. Ashland University’s Physics program allows you...

Undergraduate
Degree Type: BS
Educating a Scientific Youth

Do you have a passion for teaching and want to introduce young minds to the wonders of science? Ashland University’s teacher-training program is highly regarded as one of the best in Ohio. When you graduate with a degree in any of our science education majors, you’ll...

Curriculum

Brochures, Course Rotations

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you. Current Undergraduate Catalog

Department Course Rotations (CHEM, GEOL, PHYS)

Current Academic Year

AYA Life Science Education Four-Year Guide

2019-2020 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

2018-2019 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics Four-Year Guide

2017-2018 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics Four-Year Guide

2016-2017 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Geoscience Technology & Mgmt. Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

2015-2016 Academic Year

Biochemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry & ACS Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Chemistry Education Four-Year Guide
Earth Science Education Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Environmental Science/Geology Four-Year Guide
Forensic Chemistry Four-Year Guide
Geology Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. General Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Integrated Science w. Univ. Physics Four-Year Guide
Physical Science Education Four-Year Guide
Physics, B.S. Four-Year Guide

Faculty & Staff

Dr. Robert Bergosh, Associate Professor
Dr. Robert Bergosh
Associate Professor of Chemistry
422 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5871 / rbergosh@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
headshot.jpg
Dr. Steven Boyer
Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry
130, Kettering Science Building
419.289.5497 / sboyer5@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Nigel Brush, Professor of Geology
Dr. Nigel Brush
Professor of Geology
421 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5271 / nbrush@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics , Environmental Science Program
Dr. Rebecca Corbin
Dr. Rebecca Corbin
Professor of Chemistry, Chair, Chemistry, Geology and Physics Department
423 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5268 / rcorbin@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Perry Corbin, Professor of Chemistry
Dr. Perry Corbin
Professor of Chemistry
420 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5269 / pcorbin@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Rodney Michael, Associate Professor
Dr. Rodney Michael
Associate Professor of Physics
206 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5272 / rmichael@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Brian Mohney, Professor
Dr. Brian Mohney
Professor of Chemistry
417 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5962 / bmohney@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Trina Mohney, Professional Instructor
Trina Mohney
Professional Instructor
415 , Kettering Science Building
419.207.4526 / tmohney@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics
Dr. Jeffrey Weidenhamer, Professor
Dr. Jeffrey Weidenhamer
Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of Chemistry
419 , Kettering Science Building
419.289.5281 / jweiden@ashland.edu
Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics , Environmental Science Program

Science Day

Mohican District Science Day is the district science fair for students in grades 5-12 in schools of Ashland, Richland, Wayne, Holmes, Medina, Lorain, Huron, and Erie counties. Students who enter District Science Day must receive superior ratings at science fairs held locally at their own school, county, or school district. Projects that have followed Ohio Academy of Science (OAS) standards from students who come from schools where local science fairs are not held are also welcome providing you contact the Director for special permission. Students receiving superior ratings at the district level may then be selected to compete in the Ohio Academy of Science's State Science Fair at The Ohio State University on May 11, 2020.

Learn more about the Mohican District Science Day!

Science News

Ashland Toxicology and Forensic Biology major receives Ohio EPA scholarship

Senior Maria Kern is the latest AU Science student to receive a $2500 scholarship from the Ohio EPA’s Environmental Education Fund. Maria has conducted environmental science research as part of our University’s water monitoring program at our Black Fork wetlands preserve. More recently she has started a new research project with chemistry professor Dr. Jeff Weidenhamer. In the summer of 2018 Maria was part of the field research internship program at Central Michigan University. Maria is also a member of the University’s honors program and a Choose Ohio First scholar.

Maria writes about her new scholarship:
Winning the 2019 OEEF Scholarship was a great start to my senior year. This award provides valuable scholarship opportunities which allow natural science students with experience in environmental research to continue their education. This award will allow me to focus more fully on my classes and research without having to worry about covering the cost of books or any tuition not covered by other scholarships. Additional focus on my research will increase the quality of my capstone which I will be defending in the spring, and may create new job opportunities for me after graduation.
Maria is the 24th Ashland University science student to be chosen for the Ohio EPA scholarship since 2006, including four just last year....Read more

A Summer of Mammoths


Over the summer, Dr. Nigel Brush, Professor of Geology, has been kept busy identifying various rocks, fossils, and human artifacts exposed by recent heavy rains and flash floods here in NE Ohio. While this summer’s heavy rains were not good for farmers, as well as some home owners living near streams, it was a windfall for geologists and archaeologists as nature accidentally revealed some of the ancient treasures buried beneath the earth’s surface.

Mammoth tooth found at the Inn at Honey RunThe fossil that has generated the greatest interest was a mammoth tooth found by a twelve-year-old boy in a stream bed near the Inn at Honey Run, located a few miles outside the town of Millersburg in Holmes County. Nigel confirmed that this large tooth was indeed a mammoth tooth. He and Jeff Dilyard (a member of the Ashland/Wooster/Columbus Archaeological and Geologic Consortium) subsequently visited the Inn to examine the tooth and the find location. With permission from the Inn owner, Jason Niles, they surveyed the stream bed and banks upstream from the find site, but found no additional mammoth teeth or bones.
Two types of mammoth lived in Ohio during the Ice Age: Woolly Mammoth and Jefferson Mammoth. These mammoths had four large teeth (two upper and two lower). As the ridges on each tooth wore down by grinding grasses and small seeds, the tooth was shoved forward in the jaw by a new tooth until the old tooth fell out. Over their lifetime of 60-80 years, a mammoth would have six complete sets of teeth. Therefore, a single mammoth might lose some 20 teeth before developing its final set of teeth.
Another member of the elephant family that lived in Ohio during the Ice Age was the American Mastodon. Mastodons were slightly smaller than...Read more

Ashland Toxicology major receives travel award to national meeting

Ashland University Toxicology, Biology, and Environmental Science triple-major Shelby Reutter recently attended the national meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in Baltimore, Maryland with support from the society's Undergraduate Diversity Program Travel Award. This travel program provides full support for travel and housing to the annual SOT meeting and a program designed for undergraduate students to learn about careers in toxicology. Shelby is the fifth of our students since 2010 to receive this award.

Shelby had the following to say about her experience at the meeting:
The Society of Toxicology meeting was a wonderful experience. I had the opportunity to listen to various professionals within the field of Toxicology (in industry, academia, and government) and it really expanded my knowledge of the whole area. Throughout the program I met with other undergraduate and graduate students and got a better understanding of potential career paths I could take. At the expo I was able to see other students' research projects, I met with companies throughout America that hire people with a toxicology background, and I gathered a lot of information about graduate school options.Soon after returning from the meeting Shelby secured a paid summer internship with drug safety testing firm Charles River Laboratory here in Ashland, Ohio, and will continue working there part-time this Fall.

The SOT is taking applications for this coming Spring's travel award program, with materials due October 18th. You can find details here. If you are interested in applying you should contact Dr. Mason Posner in the Bio/Tox Department.


...Read more

AU grad receives prestigious Yeager Award


Corianna Borton ’19 (center) with adviser Dr. Brian Mohney (center left) and co-adviser Dr. Jeff Weidenhamer (center right).May 2019 AU graduate Corianna Borton was selected as the recipient of this year’s Ernest B. Yeager award by the Cleveland Chapter of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) and the Analytical Topics Group of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The Yeager Award honors the memory of Ernest B. Yeager, the Frank Hovorka Professor Emeritus at Case Western Reserve University who was known for his pioneering contributions to the fundamental understanding of electrochemical reactions and to the development of fuel cell and battery technology.The award was presented on May 22nd at the annual Conference on Spectroscopy and Analytical Chemistry at John Carroll University, where Borton gave a presentation of her research that has focused on collecting, separating and analyzing plant root exudates (harmala alkaloids) from Syrian rue in soil using silicone tube microextraction probes—a technique for repeated sampling of lipophilic compounds in soil developed in Dr. Mohney’s and Dr. Weidenhamer’s lab. Syrian Rue releases molecules into the soil that affect the growth of other plants in the vicinity and negatively impact organisms that live in the soil near the plant. Borton’s technique utilized silicone probes to sequester and concentrate lipophilic organic compounds allowing her to quantify the root and soil alkaloids. Once sequestered, compounds were extracted from the silicone and the concentration of each compound was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), fluorescence spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. She has used these techniques to probe the dynamic release of harmala alkaloids from plants and to examine the effect the alkaloids have on monocot and dicot plants. The Yeager award recognizes Borton’s achievements in independent research, particularly in the application of spectroscopy to the...Read more

Studying Centralized Science

Explore the inner workings of the world in the Chemistry, Geology, and Physics Department at Ashland University.

Department Differentiators

All of Ashland University’s Chemistry, Geology, and Physics programs provide unique scientific experiences emphasized by close faculty and student interactions and hands-on experience with modern equipment.

When you choose a program within this department, you’ll:

  • Work side-by side with experts in the laboratory and field
  • Gain hands-on experience with the latest equipment and instrumentation
  • Prepare for a career in industry, government, and education or further professional and graduate-level training

Explore our many programs for one that best suits your career objective.

Support the Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics

By donating any amount you're making a big difference in our department's future. To designate your gift to the Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics , select “Other” in the "Designated Options" and type the department's name in the associated box.

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