Contact Us

On-Campus Program

Laura Fisher
Administrative Assistant

144 Dwight Schar College of Education
419-207-4967

Online Program

Dr. Mark Rubin
419-289-5657
mrubin3@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Brochure, Course Rotation & Four-Year Guide

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

Undergraduate Catalogs

Course Rotations

Current Academic Year
Criminal Justice Four-Year Guide

Department News

AU Grad Accepted into Master's Program

Brandon Ehlinger, a Criminal Justice graduate (Dec 2017), has been admitted to the graduate program in sociology, at Bowling Green. Read more

Common Pleas Judges Visit AU Campus


Judges Vercillo and Forsthoefel, of the Common Pleas Court, took time to come speak to Ashland University Students interested in the legal field. The Judges discussed the types of cases they see, the different divisions of the common pleas court, the differences between trial and appellate court systems and the importance of being informed when electing judges.
Judge Vercillo discussed his role as the Juvenile and Probate Court Judge, including the different types of cases that occur in each court. Probate Court cases typically involve estates, guardianships, trust cases, name changes, marriage licenses, and things of that nature. Juvenile Court involves cases with anyone under the age of 18. These cases can involve anything from neglect and abuse cases, to juvenile offender and criminal cases.
Judge Forsthoefel, on the other hand, oversees the General Division and Domestic relations dockets. The General Division involves civil cases (malpractice, property disputes, real estate titles, workers compensation, etc.) as well as well as the felony cases. The Domestic Relations Docket involves all disputes between married families (divorce, child support, custody, civil protection orders, etc.).
Both Judges Vercillo and Forsthoefel agreed that being a judge is a very demanding job, but it is ultimately very rewarding. Special thanks to both Judges for taking the time to come speak.
...Read more

Recently Published Research by Dr. Allyson Drinkard


Dr. Allyson Drinkard, assistant professor of Criminal Justice/Sociology, has published an article in the Journal of Criminal Justice Education. 

This research explores the benefits of service-learning among a group of Midwestern college students. Students enrolled in a section of a Juvenile Delinquency course served as volunteers at a juvenile detention facility and were studied using a pre-test/post-test survey design. This pilot project also included a comparison group of students in a section of the course which did not involve service-learning. 
The study compared service-learning to non-service-learning students in terms of attitudes regarding juvenile delinquency, punishment, and attributions of criminal behavior. We also examined any possible effects of service-learning on student academic skills, career goals and comfort level with delinquents. Overall, we found that the service-learning project was a valuable educational tool having a positive impact on a number of student outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for service-learning research and practice....Read more

Ashland University's Marc Hedrick quoted in WalletHub Article


Criminal Justice Professional Instructor and Field Experience Coordinator Marc Hedrick was quoted in a WalletHub article about the most sinful states in America.

The article by Hedrick addresses a number of questions, including "What makes some states more sinful than others?"; "Should sport betting be legalized across the U.S. by the federal government?"; 'What are the most efficient measures that federal and state authorities can utilize to curb the obesity epidemic and is something like the 'soda tax' a valid approach?"; and "How can federal authorities combat human trafficking and is legalizing prostitution a good idea?"

You can see the article at -

https://wallethub.com/edu/most-sinful-states/46852/#marc-hedrick
...Read more

Contact Us

Contact Us

On-Campus Program

Laura Fisher
Administrative Assistant

144 Dwight Schar College of Education
419-207-4967

Online Program

Dr. Mark Rubin
419-289-5657
mrubin3@ashland.edu

Curriculum

Curriculum

Brochure, Course Rotation & Four-Year Guide

Each department provides information specific to its majors and programs to help ensure you choose exactly which major is right for you. Use the supplemental material below to assist you in finding a major that most interests you.

Undergraduate Catalogs

Course Rotations

Current Academic Year
Criminal Justice Four-Year Guide

Department News

Department News

AU Grad Accepted into Master's Program

Brandon Ehlinger, a Criminal Justice graduate (Dec 2017), has been admitted to the graduate program in sociology, at Bowling Green. Read more

Common Pleas Judges Visit AU Campus


Judges Vercillo and Forsthoefel, of the Common Pleas Court, took time to come speak to Ashland University Students interested in the legal field. The Judges discussed the types of cases they see, the different divisions of the common pleas court, the differences between trial and appellate court systems and the importance of being informed when electing judges.
Judge Vercillo discussed his role as the Juvenile and Probate Court Judge, including the different types of cases that occur in each court. Probate Court cases typically involve estates, guardianships, trust cases, name changes, marriage licenses, and things of that nature. Juvenile Court involves cases with anyone under the age of 18. These cases can involve anything from neglect and abuse cases, to juvenile offender and criminal cases.
Judge Forsthoefel, on the other hand, oversees the General Division and Domestic relations dockets. The General Division involves civil cases (malpractice, property disputes, real estate titles, workers compensation, etc.) as well as well as the felony cases. The Domestic Relations Docket involves all disputes between married families (divorce, child support, custody, civil protection orders, etc.).
Both Judges Vercillo and Forsthoefel agreed that being a judge is a very demanding job, but it is ultimately very rewarding. Special thanks to both Judges for taking the time to come speak.
...Read more

Recently Published Research by Dr. Allyson Drinkard


Dr. Allyson Drinkard, assistant professor of Criminal Justice/Sociology, has published an article in the Journal of Criminal Justice Education. 

This research explores the benefits of service-learning among a group of Midwestern college students. Students enrolled in a section of a Juvenile Delinquency course served as volunteers at a juvenile detention facility and were studied using a pre-test/post-test survey design. This pilot project also included a comparison group of students in a section of the course which did not involve service-learning. 
The study compared service-learning to non-service-learning students in terms of attitudes regarding juvenile delinquency, punishment, and attributions of criminal behavior. We also examined any possible effects of service-learning on student academic skills, career goals and comfort level with delinquents. Overall, we found that the service-learning project was a valuable educational tool having a positive impact on a number of student outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for service-learning research and practice....Read more

Ashland University's Marc Hedrick quoted in WalletHub Article


Criminal Justice Professional Instructor and Field Experience Coordinator Marc Hedrick was quoted in a WalletHub article about the most sinful states in America.

The article by Hedrick addresses a number of questions, including "What makes some states more sinful than others?"; "Should sport betting be legalized across the U.S. by the federal government?"; 'What are the most efficient measures that federal and state authorities can utilize to curb the obesity epidemic and is something like the 'soda tax' a valid approach?"; and "How can federal authorities combat human trafficking and is legalizing prostitution a good idea?"

You can see the article at -

https://wallethub.com/edu/most-sinful-states/46852/#marc-hedrick
...Read more

What Can I do With a Major in Criminal Justice?

Possible Career Occupations

(Note: not all criminal justice occupations are listed. Some career options may require additional study. Some of our Graduates go on to graduate school or law school.)

Federal Occupations:

  • Department of Homeland Security (Border Patrol, Customs)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • Federal Police Officer
  • Deputy U.S. Marshal
  • Secret Service Officer and Secret Service Investigator
  • Drug Enforcement Agency 
  • Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Special Agent
  • Department of Transportation
  • Office of Inspector General
  • Internal Revenue Service Special Agent
  • U.S. Secret Service Uniform Division
  • U.S. Postal Inspector Agent
  • Federal Air Marshal
  • Transportation Security Administration Office of Law Enforcement 

State Occupations:

  • State Highway Patrol or State Police
  • Crime Labs
  • Victim-Offender Advocate Programs
  • Attorney General’s Office, Narcotics, Organized Crime, Bur of Motor Vehicles
  • Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Enforcement Officer
  • State Watercraft Officer
  • State Liquor Control
  • College Security
  • Worker’s Compensation

Local Occupations:

Policing in Municipal, Village, Township, County Sheriff’s Departments, and Park Police Departments

Correctional Occupations:

  • Federal, State, County, or Municipal Probation Officer
  • Juvenile Probation and also Detention Centers
  • State Parole Officer
  • State Victim-Witness Assistant
  • Federal or State Prisons (Officer, Case Management, Unit Supervisor)

Private Sector Law Enforcement:

  • Retail Loss Prevention and Corporate Security
  • Insurance Companies
  • Private Detective
  • Hospital Police or Security
  • Security Patrol Officers

United States Department of Labor; Bureau of Labor Statistics

Checking with the United States Department of Labor; Bureau of Statistics on May 14, 2021, the following information is detailed in their “Occupational Outlook Handbook” regarding employment in the following fields:

Police & Detectives: Employment of police and detectives is projected to grow 5 percent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.  The need for public safety is expected to lead to new openings for officers, although demand may vary by geographic location.

Correctional Officers: State and local budget constraints and prison population levels will determine how many correctional officers are necessary.  Changes to criminal laws can have a large effect on how many people are arrested and incarcerated each year.  Community-based programs designed to rehabilitate prisoners and limit their risk of repeated offenses may also reduce prisoner counts.  Job prospects should still be good due to the need to replace correctional officers who transfer to other occupations or leave the labor force, such as to retire.

Private Detectives and Investigators: Employment of private detectives and investigators is projected to grow 8 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.  Demand for private detectives and investigators will stem from security concerns and from the need to protect confidential information.  Strong competition can be expected for jobs.

Criminal Justice Career Outlook

One of the most appealing things about a degree in criminal justice is how versatile it is.  Not only does it open doors for a career in local, state, or federal law enforcement, there are opportunities for careers in corrections, forensics, probation, and parole,  and the private sector in security and cybersecurity.  Employment in protective service occupations is projected to grow 3 percent from 2019 to 2029, about as fast as the average, and will result in about 95,200 new jobs.  Applicants who hold a bachelor’s degree, especially those with experience, are the most likely to be hired by federal agencies. Learn More!

Center for Academic Support

Center for Academic Support