Faculty Spotlight

Jeremy Bailey
Faculty

Jeremy D. Bailey, Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston, holds the Ross M. Lence Distinguished Teaching Chair and a dual appointment in Political Science and the university's Honors College. His research interests include executive power, constitutionalism, and American political thought and development.  His current book project is The Idea of Presidential Representation: An Intellectual and Political History.  His major publications include James Madison and Constitutional Imperfection (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University Press of Kansas 2013, coauthored with David Alvis and Flagg Taylor), which was named a 2014 “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice, "The New Unitary Executive and Democratic Theory," (American Political Science Review 2008) and Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007).

Bailey attended Rhodes College and received his Ph.D. from Boston College, where his dissertation was the 2004 co-winner of the APSA' s E. E. Schattschneider Prize for best dissertation in American politics. He joined the University of Houston in 2007, and, in 2014, he was awarded the University's Provost Core Teaching Excellence Award.  He is the director of the Phronesis minor in the Honors College and the co-director of the Tocqueville Forum in American Ideas and Institutions.

College Credit Plus

With many states and school districts now making a push to offer College Credit Plus programs—college-level courses on high school campuses—teachers like you need courses that can prepare you for the challenge of college-level instruction.  Whether your state calls it College Credit Plus, Dual Enrollment, Dual Credit, Postsecondary Education Option, or another moniker, Ashland’s graduate courses in American history and government are suitable for secondary school teachers seeking additional expertise, as well as college credit plus pathways to qualification as community college adjunct instructors.

Getting Started

In higher education, hiring institutions determine the qualifications required for potential instructors.  Typically, this is a master’s degree in the subject area to be taught OR a master’s degree in any field plus 18 hours in the subject area.  Consult the hiring institution for their exact requirements.  We strongly encourage you to contact the community college with which your school district has partnered before you begin your studies. 

Looking to earn a master’s degree to become qualified to teach College Credit Plus courses?

           Both the MAHG and MASTAHG degree options are suitable for K-12 teachers who wish to become qualified to teach college-level courses on a high school campus or as an adjunct instructor at a community college. Again, you are encouraged to contact the hiring institution to determine exactly which Ashland courses will best prepare you to become an adjunct instructor.

           Learn more about Ashland's Master of Arts in American History and Government and Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government degree programs. Ready to get started? Apply today.

Already have a master’s degree in education or another field?

           If you already have a Master of Education or similar degree, it may be possible to qualify as a College Credit Plus instructor by enrolling at Ashland on a non-degree basis to take additional course work in American history or government. Again, you are encouraged to contact the hiring institution to determine exactly which Ashland courses will best prepare you to become an adjunct instructor.

           Enrolling on a non-degree basis is easy. View the schedule and get started today at our TeachingAmericanHistory.org website.

Planning Your College Credit Plus Curriculum

Your College Credit Plus program should be guided by the college-level subjects you plan to teach. The College Credit Plus pathway for an adjunct history instructor will be a little different from that prescribed for a government instructor, though there will likely be some overlap between the two. Not to worry, however. Our faculty advisors are available to work with you, your administration, and your district's higher education partner to find the right courses for you.

To help you get started with course selection, we've put together a handy guide listing courses suggested for future history instructors and those suggested for future government instructors. We strongly suggest choosing courses in consultation with the community college for which you will work. Have questions about our courses or need sample syllabi? Feel free to contact us at mahg@ashland.edu or (419) 289-5411.