Registration

Online Registration

Registration for upcoming semesters takes place via WebAdvisor.

For complete instructions for online registration via WebAdvisor, click here

Please note that all tuition and fees owed from prior semesters MUST be paid prior to registering for a subsequent semester.

Registration Dates

Fall Semester

Registration for all courses begins July 1st.

Spring Semester

Registration for all courses begins November 1st.

Summer Semester

Registration for AHG-prefix courses begins January 1st. Registration for EDxx-prefix courses begins April 1st.

Qualifying Examination

AHG 693 - Qualifying Examination

Research Methods Seminar

Students who plan to write a thesis or capstone project should attend the Research Methods seminar around the time they will reach 20 semester credit hours. Research Methods involves a one-time group meeting of about two hours in which the program faculty will introduce students to the research and proposal writing process. After the group meeting, students continue work on their preliminary research and begin writing their proposal working one-on-one with the research methods advisor.

Please note that the 20 hour mark is a guideline but not an absolute rule. Some students may be ready to begin the thesis or capstone project process prior to 20 hours. Consult your academic advisor for assistance determining when it is appropriate for your to begin.

Register for an upcoming Research Methods seminar

Thesis and Capstone Project

Students who are nearing completion of their thesis or capstone project should register and pay for the corresponding 4 semester credit hour course. Students need not register for the thesis or capstone project course until their final semester. Payment in full is due at the time of registration at the prevailing on-campus tuition rate. Students who plan to pay for their thesis or capstone project course tuition using federal or private student loans should submit their loan application to the Ashland University Office of Financial Aid well in advance of the end of the semester in which they enroll in AHG 691 or AHG 692.

AHG 691 - Thesis

AHG 692 - Capstone Project

Effective Writing for MAHG & MASTAHG

Students in this course will work to improve basic writing skills, with the specific intent of becoming more effective writers in general, and during their time in the MAHG or MASTAHG programs. The purpose of the course is for the student to develop an extended essay meeting at least the minimal requirements specified in the MAHG and MASTAHG grading rubric for content knowledge, analysis of, and interpretation. The focus will be on improving the organization, structure, and logic of written work; improving clarity and readability; and identifying and correcting errors in grammar and usage. The course is offered concurrently with other courses and may be taken more than once upon the recommendation of the chair. The student will arrange mutually convenient meeting times with the instructor. These meetings may be conducted in-person, by phone, or via web conference. Students will be contacted by the program office with additional information after the submission of this registration.

AHG 6XX - Effective Writing for MAHG & MASTAHG

Faculty Spotlight

Jeffrey Sikkenga
Faculty

Jeffrey Sikkenga is Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Ashbrook Scholar program at Ashland University. He has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in political thought, the American Founding, and American constitutional law. He is deeply interested in the relationship between politics and religion in liberal democracy and America in particular. He has published articles and reviews in journals such as Political Theory, History of Political Thought, Journal of Politics, Journal of Markets and Morality, and Religion and Liberty. He co-edited History of American Political Thought (Lexington Press, 2003), edited Transforming American Welfare (1999), and co-wrote The Free Person and the Free Economy (2002). He is currently working on a book on the natural right to freedom of religion in the political thought of John Locke and the American Founders, exploring the foundations and political implications of religious liberty as a human right.